50

Codeshares usually work in that way, that an airline buys a number of seats on a flight operated by another airline. In your example, both Virgin and Air France bought each a set of seats from Delta, which they can now sell under their own flight number, within their own fare rules and fare scheme. Depending on how many seats they bought and already have ...


12

The rules will apply to the operating carrier. ie, the one that is actually flying the flight - not the one that you booked with. EU Compensation applies to EU airlines regardless of where the flight is to/from, AND to non-EU airlines for flights DEPARTING an EU member state. eg, a Lufthansa flight between the US and Frankfurt would be covered in either ...


11

There is no difference other than the price, at least on the plane. On board, the only difference between passenger service is differentiated by the class. Usually, there are up to 4 classes: Economy, Premium Economy (or Economy Comfort), Business, and First class. I think there will also be no difference at the airport for Economy class at least. Some ...


11

When it comes to putting miles into your account with Frequent Flyer Program X, it is always Frequent Flyer X's rules that count. The fact that ANZ would give your their miles for the flight if you were an ANZ member is irrelevant. Generally, it doesn't matter which *A program you join, but there are oddities when a particular fare class earns miles in one ...


10

There's also that factor that many airlines and aggregators adjust prices by your search history. Example: I got a price much higher than one I had seen before. I closed the tab (but not the browser), deleted cookies from that site, went back to the site, did the same search and got the same flight for the same lower price I had seen earlier. (MUCH lower)


8

The ticket has an Airline1 flight number for this leg and mentions "Operated by Airline2". I want to know the Airline2 flight number for this leg. What you are looking for is called the prime code. Flight Stats is usually useful for this. Simply enter the marketing carrier and marketing flight number. For instance, on the page for AA 6770 you can see it ...


8

The simplest way of finding out your mileage earning on a partner airline or codeshare operating each segment of your trip is to plug the fare class into the wheretocredit web site. You can see the Miles & More earning on Singapore airlines here. You'll need to know the fare class for each segment which is not always readily apparent.


8

Yes the same flight can have multiple flight codes if it is run in codeshare agreement between multiple airlines. Quoting from the linked page: Typically, a flight is operated by one airline (technically called an "administrating carrier"1) while seats are sold for the flight by all cooperating airlines using their own designator and flight number. ...


7

Surely the relevant question is whether or not they codeshare on that route? And they don't: in fact, Brussels Airlines' website won't let you buy tickets to Stockholm Arlanda (ARN) at all. They only operate routes, codeshare or otherwise, into Stockholm Bromma (BMA).


7

ITA Matrix lets you search like this, but it won't actually book your flights. Use the "advanced routing codes" option and the specific flight syntax F:AA1234" (for AA 1234). You'd then need to find a travel agent who can actually book your ticket, or try to find the same itinerary on Google Flights or Hipmunk (using the secret Hipmunk search codes). Be ...


7

I definitely want to avoid the codeshare. Is it feasible to avoid it No. or if not, is there still a way to discern or predict if a flight will be codeshared, from a set of variables such as airline As far as I am aware, practically any flight in an alliance can be booked with any airline in the alliance. You need to look outside of alliance and at ...


7

One of the complexities of codeshare flights in the *alliance network is that the mileage earnings are based on the rates of the operating carrier, not the marketing carrier. (in your case the rate of Singapore airlines). This means you would need to check the fare class of the singapore airlines flight against the earnings table of lufthansa's M&M ...


7

And then on another flight search engine search (mine) for the same flight, the cheapest flight is a different airline altogether, no Delta flights exist (matches yours) and Virgin Atlantic is actually more expensive. Go figure ;) The number of providers between the airline and the website can be several layers deep. As a result, with commissions, different ...


7

You can't double dip. Your booking is always associated with a single frequent flyer account, regardless which carrier flies, markets, books or operates it. You can easily change it anytime before the flight typically until check in, but there can be only one at a time Benefits get credited after completion of the flight depending on what frequent flyer is ...


5

One possible way to see all the flight numbers that a flight is sold under is to consult the departure flights information page of the departing airport's website (of course, some airports may not maintain such a page, but all those of a reasonable size very probably do). For example, here is a screenshot of that page for LGW (London Gatwick) airport: It ...


5

As far as I can tell, there seems to be no IATA or ICAO rule regarding the maximum number of codeshares a flight may be marketed under. I imagine there must be a technological limitation at some point, but having seven or eight codeshares is not terribly uncommon, and flights with a dozen or more have been reported in discussions at FlyerTalk and at ...


5

I assume this is a single ticket (you bought a journey from CLE to CPH in one transaction). Your bags will be checked through to Copenhagen. You will not need to collect your bags in London. The baggage allowance applied on all sectors will be that of the transatlantic carrier (AA). On the return the same is true.


5

For a schedule change in advance it is always the ticketing carrier (in this case, Emirates) that is responsible for rebooking you after the change. In a perfect world this would be handled automatically, but when multiple airlines are involved it generally doesn't - especially when those airlines are not part of the same alliance (Emirates is NOT OneWorld, ...


4

Since you are Mileage plus, the safest bet would be to book on United using UA flight numbers (regardless of who owns the metal). Since United has switched to miles+dollars for status miles, it's become more complicated and prone to errors to get Star Alliance miles credited. I had a Lufthansa flight that came through with $0 and I had to call twice to get ...


4

Always follow the marketing airline's policy, in other words, the airline that sold you the ticket, regardless of which airline is operating the flight. In your case that's Iberia.


4

Check in should always be done with the airline actually operating the first flight, even in the case of codeshares, so here it is Jet Airways. If you show up at the United desk, they may accept your check-in, or more probably redirect you to the Jet desk. I don't know what you mean by "partner airlines", but I see that Jet is not a Star Alliance member, so ...


4

FlightStats gives code-share information for any flight. Looking up a flight number on that site gives a listing of its codesahres, among other flight information. For example, if you enter AC (Air Canada) 8975 on Dec-04-2015 into the Flight Status box, click Search, and then scroll down to the "AC 8975 Flight Information" box, you see an entry saying: ...


4

Lufthansa is much more restrictive than United is when it comes to seat reservations in the economy cabin. According to the Seat reservations for Economy Class passengers page on its website, it may not be possible at all for you to request a seat more than 23 hours in advance of your flight because it does not have a Lufthansa flight number. Economy ...


4

The Asiana frequent flyer membership guide says on page 31: When a member boards a codeshare flight, the member earns miles according to the fare and the class of the ticket purchased and the mileage program of the airline operating the flight. (...) When a member boards a codeshare flight, the member earns miles according to the fare and ...


4

The short answer is "economics". The long answer is to do with price versus demand. If you run an airline you have to publish schedules in which you commit to flying a certain number of times each day along each route. The costs of doing this are pretty much fixed regardless of whether the planes fly full or empty (a full plane takes a bit more fuel, but ...


3

Whether a flight is a codeshare or not, doesn't really affect the situations you are asking about. Return flights, or multi-city flights, do not impose any requirement for a flight to be booked as a codeshare or not. A codeshare is merely a marketing device to sell one physisical flight by multiple airlines. If you book Paris-Dallas-Mexico City, it may be ...


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