44

Travelling by cargo ship (mostly container but also bulk or ro-ro, never heard anything about travelling on a tanker, presumably for safety reasons) is totally a thing. More information and links to specific agents can be found in previous questions tagged “freighter travel”. Many websites advertise specific journeys but you can always contact an agent and ...


38

As owner of a yacht there is no problem. I have been in contact with Bobby Schenk, a well-known German open-sea sailor who writes about problems on board, in your case firearms. As owner of your boat the relevant law for possessing and storing weapons is your country of origin, in your case USA, more specifically your state law. I suppose you have all ...


33

A repositioning cruise is a one-way voyage of a ship between two regions. Most people take cruises where the departure and arrival port is the same. This is simple since only a standard return fare to the port. Those cruises usually do a circuit in short segments, stopping almost every day at a different port. Now since there are different low and high ...


28

A friend did something similar, where he kayaked from Vancouver, Canada to Alaska. Turns out you need to report in the same day you arrive. He was tired and slept that night, and the next day went to check in. Naturally there was a) no record of him leaving Canada and b) he'd been on US soil for 24 hours as an illegal alien. They sent him packing and ...


27

Yes, ships sink. Someone already mentioned the Costa Concordia sinking; ferries sink a fair amount as well (for instance, a South Korean ferry sank last year with the loss of almost 300 lives. On June 1 of this year, a ferry in China sank with the loss of at least 440 lives. In addition to deaths from sinking, there are also deaths from maritime collisions, ...


27

You don't need $5k for a cruise. For example, http://www.repositioncruises.com/holland-america-repositioning-cruises/ has 2017 October 3 – 15-day Transatlantic from Rome to Fort Lauderdale, Florida, visiting Alicante (05), Malaga (06), Cadiz (07), Funchal (09) – prices from $1200 pp. 2018 March 28 – 14-day Transatlantic from Fort Lauderdale to Rome, ...


25

It's possible to travel on cargo ships, though I'm not sure how practical it is. There are certainly container ships sailing backwards and forwards between the west coast of the US and Japan (and China and other parts of east Asia). See, for example, this question.


25

Freighters are an option. It's not really cheap but should be cheaper than 5k$, perhaps around €1500 all-in. In France, Brest or La Rochelle are not usual departure points, Saint-Nazaire or, especially, Le Havre are better options. This answer to another question provides pointers to a number of agencies who can arrange a trip like that. One thing to note ...


22

I am assuming you don't have much experience at sea by the question. First of all, be careful. I strongly suggest you read @TimLymington before mine. The duration of a crossing depends of your boat and luck with the weather. You can be lucky and get a nice 20 Knots wind, or unlucky having 0 Knots or worse 30 knots or above. You should check the dominant ...


21

My father did Liverpool - Azores - Halifax in a 26 foot wooden sailboat (a Thames Bawley, mahogany) in 1984 with a total crew of 3. Liverpool - Azores took 17 days; Azores - Halifax took 21. (They spent a week in the Azores resupplying and changing some of the crew since taking 6 weeks vacation to be part of something like this is quite a challenge.) BTW he ...


21

Besides marinas there are several websites/forums you can search: Sailnet Cruisers Forum There are also “professional” websites that list ads like: Crew Seekers Find a crew Some of the websites require that you pay a fee. Anyway, as I commented before you may be required to have skills. Nevertheless make sure that the crew (and the captain) are also ...


21

Many cruise lines offer transpacific routes. Here is one I found via Google (cruise Vancouver Japan) link If you want to travel regularly, this would not be the best option due to the limited number of ships making that route, but for a one-time trip, it seems reasonable.


19

You can, but the travel is a bit on the unconventional side. Most shipping companies will accept passengers at a relatively cheap rate and you can just tag along. I live in Manila, my father in law runs one such company, my brother in law is a cook for another. There are some caveats: You're surrounded by 'salty sailors', which may or may not be acceptable ...


19

There is a relatively simple and cheap option for those who don't want the rigours of a freighter and don't have the skills to crew a yacht. That is to take a repositioning cruise on a normal cruise liner. These get sold off very cheap, since it's basically fifteen days on a cruise ship without stopping at the interesting islands and tourist spots that ...


19

There are currently no ferry services running between Sri Lanka and India. There have been various proposals (some of which even started running for a short while in 2011, 2012 and 2015) but none of them have lasted. Your best bet is probably to fly from Tiruchirappalli Airport (roughly in the middle of your first screenshot) to Colombo. Sri Lankan fly twice ...


18

Generally No. Again this depends completely on the marriage laws of your home country and possibly also the ship's home country. But according to this (German) article, most countries do not allow this. It even mentions a number of regulations (by the US Navy, the state of New York, and the British merchant navy) that explicitly disallow it. It also ...


18

Why? All big vessels are very slow to react to changes in speed, often need 10's of miles to go from cruising speed to no motion left. They are also designed to hold their course steady, which makes them very unresponsive to the rudder, specially on the slow speeds needed for docking. Harbour approaches always have many big ships and often also a lot of ...


18

Another option is Cunard's Queen Mary 2, the only passenger liner with regularly scheduled service between Europe and the USA. You'll have to get yourself to Southampton by train, but the ship docks in New York on the other end. While it is expensive, they have some special offers for fares on certain sailings between $649-$1049/person (assuming double ...


17

It might actually be dangerous to answer this question. It sounds innocuous, like "How long would it take me to drive from New York to San Francisco?", but any answer to that question can assume that the driver knows how to cross mountain ranges and deserts safely, and that if the car breaks down it can be fixed by a mechanic. Telling somebody who doesn't ...


17

I have written an article about seasickness, so I will give a resume. Seasickness has nothing to do with willpower. If someone accuses you of that, tell him that Horatio Nelson and Shackleton on the "James Caird" were both seasick. The exact cause of seasickness is still unknown. The "frame of reference" theory has the flaw that blind people can get seasick,...


16

Your sailing boat (assuming it is properly registered) has the same rights and responsibilities as any other ship, up to and including a cruise liner or supertanker. As long as you fly a yellow Q flag when you enter territorial waters and keep it flying for a reasonable period, it's up to Customs to come and inspect your boat and papers. If you are passing ...


15

Nothing and nobody can justifiably stop you heading to international waters. ( The freedom of the seas) However, that's only half the story: afterwards, you will have to enter somebody's territorial waters (unless you plan to stay at sea forever to avoid taxes; some very rich people have plans to do just that). When you do, you will need visas, customs ...


15

You can't hitchhike to the Galalpagos. If you are trying to do things on the cheap your best bet is to turn up to Guayaquil in Ecuador. From here they have boats cruises that depart on tours around the Galapagos. If you have time on your hands you can hang around and wait for a boat tour where they haven't sold all of the spaces. Depending on demand, you ...


14

I think you need to radio the authorities when you near the port and they will give you instructions. They will either send a boat to meet you or tell you where to dock. Before leaving your home country, you should be in touch with the embassy or consulate of each country you plan to visit to obtain any necessary visas and also to ask about their policy on ...


14

Familiarity can certainly reduce the likelihood of sea sickness, as your body can get used to it. The usual problem is the swell - which you just don't get on lakes. Out on the ocean you have no stationary frame of reference so your brain starts to believe the boat is stationary. As it is actually moving, this confuses your brain and causes sickness. ...


13

One thing to add to Kizzle's answer is that Tourism to the Galapagos is highly regulated. The number of visitors is limited and all tours visiting the area are counted, registered etc, since 98% of the land is national park. You cannot visit those areas by yourself, you need a certified guide. So even if you own a boat, you cannot just travel around and ...


13

First the general route to get to Europe over South America with sails: You start at the East or North Coast, move over the West Indies, go north to the USA, move northeast with the Gulf Stream and if you get far enough to the north, you have wind from the west and you can cross the Atlantic. Now you are in Chile and this is really the absolutely worst ...


13

As a retired SEAL I find the comments regarding weapon selection absolutely hilarious. If you want a standoff weapon own and know how to use an M4 / AR variant. In regards to the legality of possessing that rifle while cruising TALK TO A MARITIME ATTORNEY (and keep his card lol). The realities of the pirate situation are such that you are going to lose a ...


13

The general rule is that Schengen visas cannot be issued at the border. However, there are special exceptions from this (Schengen Visa Code, article 36 and annex IX) for seamen who leave service on a ship in a Schengen port and need to transit the Schengen area to return to their home country. Such a visa must be arranged through the shipping company (who ...


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