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157

If you've been on a plane before, I'm sure you've walked past first class; nobody cares. If you want to dress up, sure, but I'd prefer to be casual and comfortable.


85

and just wanted to experience it at least once. Dress up, dress as nice as you like and comfortably can for a flight and make it a whole experience. You want to enjoy it so enjoy it to the fullest. Banter : Go ahead flag it I would not bother about all these comments and answers trying to dampen your spirit oh business class is nothing in the US, oh this ...


31

Not at all! In fact, we see it as a sign of respect. It will also help you with the heat! these things are designed for the hellish weather in this desert. One thing to remember, be sure to use the right name in the right place, for some reason it has many names depending on the place and people might not understand it. The name "Thobe" in the UAE for ...


29

From Saint-Peter's Basilica site:


29

Nobody cares what you wear in first class. I recently flew to Barcelona in first class with casual shorts. The flight attendant kept apologising for a loud family near me, but I was fine. They had kids and kids will be kids. It's all about attitude, not dress.


25

For the general area, there's no dress code - you even see people wandering through in their swimming gear after they've been in the pool! I've been in wearing t-shirt and jeans, feeling under-dressed until I saw the tourists in their t-shirt and shorts with flip-flops. However, you may wish to consider what else you want to do in Vegas, and dress ...


21

As a night clerk at a 2 star hotel in the US, I can say it depends, mainly on if you're comfortable with it. Most people wear non-sleep clothes while not in their rooms. However, there are some people who will walk around in pajamas. On very rare occasions, I've even seen people come to breakfast in their pajamas. Higher star hotels may be more rigid, and I ...


21

The only realistic answer to this question is that there is no answer. Standards of dress in the US are not standardized, except in certain contexts like prisons, the military, certain types of business, Catholic schools, and fancy restaurants. Circa 1960 was the last time in the US when there was some kind of general consensus on what was proper dress in ...


20

Skirts specifically are not required, but modest dress certainly is, mostly in religious sites: churches like St. Peter's in the Vatican, major temples in Thailand and India, mosques pretty much anywhere if they're even open to visitors, etc. From the Vatican's official site: Access to Vatican Museums, Sistine Chapel, Vatican Gardens and Saint Peter's ...


19

In most Muslim countries, keeping the arms and legs (and of course the cleavage) covered would be considered completely sufficient, especially for someone who is visibly a foreigner. Some (e.g. Turkey, at least the bigger cities) are much more tolerant and nobody will feel offended by bare arms or legs. The strictest dress code exists in Saudi Arabia, ...


18

Short answer: no. In North America, public spaces require public dress. You would not, for example, wear a swimsuit to the restaurant. Asia is a bit more relaxed - you can walk around a Japanese resort town in what amounts to a housecoat.


16

Pretty much no one dresses up to fly domestic First Class in the U.S. (and very few people do to fly long-haul First Class.) There will probably be a few people wearing suits in First, but that's primarily because they're business travelers who are wearing the suit for business at the destination, not because they're flying First. You'll find some of those ...


15

I'm Italian and I visited Rome as a tourist myself about one year ago. The image which mouviciel so usefully linked is self-explanatory, but it is not true for Rome or Vatican City only, all the churches in Italy have something similar being displayed IF they are regularly visited by tourists (otherwise, the same rule holds but there is no specific warning,...


15

I always dress well when I fly Business Class (I never fly First). Why? Because if am flying Business Class, I am flying on a friends-and-family coupon from someone who works for the airline, and the airline (for some reason) insists on a dress code for deadheads like me. (Not that kind of Deadhead, the not-high kind.) Slacks, not jeans; button shirt; ...


12

Japanese hotels do not enforce dress codes: you can turn up in a wifebeater and flip-flops if you wish and they'll let you check in. Restaurants and bars in the hotels may, however, have and enforce their own dress clothes. I went for a peek at the Station Hotel two years ago when it opened (didn't stay though, can't quite justify those prices...), and ...


12

There are similar answers, but mine is more about Asian sights. If you are visiting Buddhist places, temples do not really force male or female to wear specific clothing, but too revealing cloths are frowned upon by locals. If you plan to visit a Buddhist place, try not to wear shorts, bikini, etc. Anything that covers until your knees and covers shoulders ...


11

Definitely not in Jordan, except in places like a mosque where you may want to show some respect but it would be enough to put a light foulard on your head. However, other countries may be more strict about this.


10

This will differ; although it's likely to be smart casual or smarter, there is variation even at the Michelin star level (some Michelin-starred are more casual, others less so). Your best option is to call the restaurant and ask. They should be able to discreetly explain it to you :)


10

Generally there is no strict dress code on the casino floors (within reason), so Jeans and T-Shirt would be just fine. There is a blog entry on the subject from Las Vegas Direct and also on TripAdvisor. There is also a somewhat decent FAQ regarding age restrictions. If you get into an exclusive area where stakes are rather large you might be required to ...


10

Not to dampen your spirits, but the experience of first class depends chiefly on the airplane you are flying on, and flights on your itinerary are all flown on either the 737, A320 or other similar aircraft. These are not really equipped with a proper first class. For most, you are looking at wider seats, some older ones may just block the center seat of ...


10

As a local, if I was going to the Rudolfinum for Czech Philharmonic, I'd wear a dark suit and a tie. However, I would consider smart pants and a dress/formal shirt perfectly acceptable too. I wouldn't recommend jeans or polo shirts.


9

In Malaysia, I've been able to get away with wearing long shorts (slightly longer than knee length), t-shirts with a modest neckline that are not overly tight, and the like. This is fine actually! Whatever you may have read in news, people are still free to dress in shorts and t-shirts. There may be mutterings from conservative locals, and I can't promise ...


8

It depends on the country. On the flight to Tehran, the crew members reminded female passengers that headscarves are required attire in public, and that all women should put on a headscarf now, before the aircraft lands.


8

Wikipedia has a handy list: List of nations that prohibit camouflage clothing. It lists 11 countries, including major destinations in the Caribbean, some countries in the Middle East and Africa, and the Philippines. You'd need to research the exact laws to know whether the trousers in question are prohibited, but yes, there are countries where wearing ...


8

De jure discrimination for non-Muslims and expatriates does not exist, but de facto discrimination might. While there were issues in a conservative Emirate a decade ago, the man-bun (as an example) is now fashionable for some people and includes long hair, in the same place. Context is important: if you're worried about traveling to a very rural, backwoods ...


7

No, there are no dress codes at temples or shrines. The Japanese attitude to religion is very relaxed... and simultaneously strict, as entry to anything even vaguely holy is generally entirely prohibited. That said, the prevailing Japanese opinion is that men's shorts above the knee are for elementary school students and the beach, although nobody will ...


7

While sites like Wikitravel don't seem to help too much in this case, fortunately we can look at anecdotal evidence and quotes on VirtualTourist pages like these. Quotes from these pages for a selection of clubs: "Dress Code: No jeans or sneakers/trainers, must be very fashionable." "Dress Code: No Jeans , shorts, or flip flops !!!!" "Dress ...


7

Because first class is comfortable, I like to wear pyjamas if it’s a long flight. Especially in the world of hoodie-and-sneaker millionaires, dressing up is only something to do if you really want to.


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