Hot answers tagged

88

Other posters have correctly answered that these are gasometers. But it's worth noting that they are no longer used at all; they were built when the UK mainly used town gas, which needed to be stored, but since the 1970s we have switched entirely to natural gas, which is piped in directly. Gasometers are now obsolete, and many of them have been demolished. ...


82

I have lived in five countries including the UK and never seen such a sign in real life. I only know them from American movies, where I've always semi-felt they were some sort of Wild West joke or something, like when they reduce the number by one after a lynching. I can't conceive of why the population would be posted outside a town, rather than its GDP, ...


81

I was finally able to get into contact with London Luton Airport, who stated that i'd be able to pass through security ~5h before departure - which is the point at which the airline activates the flight.


77

If you have an Android phone, then there's an app called Where is public toilet. It indicates the public toilets near you, and if they are free to access or not. It works for most of Europe. Play store link. Other similar apps are available.


74

If you're planning to rent a car and drive to Covent Garden, one word of advice: DON'T. London traffic and parking charges (not to mention the Congestion Charge) are mental and no Londoner in their right mind would drive into the centre, let alone a tourist. If you're getting a black cab (taxi), bear in mind it could be quicker than a Google estimate, as ...


74

No, airliners do not fly low enough that those can be photos. On the left-hand one the distance between the top of the tower and the horizon is much less than the height of the tower, meaning that if this is a photograph, it would be taken from a height of about 500 feet. The right-hand one apparently shows the top of the tower above the horizon, meaning ...


68

You are most likely to find the green light with shades on the far side of a pedestrian crossing with a safety island (i.e. a two-part crossings, most often offset to each other), as illustrated below (the o are the traffic lights): Kerb _____o------____ <- Shaded light . . >>> Traffic goes this way . . _____|=====o____ ...


67

As you've got to make the journey between airports anyway, I say make the most of it. Sleep on the plane if you can and see the city at night. I'd pack in one backpack (hand luggage strapped on top) and do it on foot, but taxi/bus/night tube (Friday and Saturday) are other options. The last tube train from Heathrow is at 23:35 (T4) or 23:42 (T5), a few ...


61

These type of shades are not restricted to pedestrian traffic lights. They are widely used in the UK when there are many lights controlling different streams of traffic around a junction. Their purpose is to ensure that drivers (and pedestrians) can only see the lights that are relevant to them and avoid problems like traffic starting to move when another ...


60

They do not need to - there is a fixed fare per bus journey (£1.50 at the time of writing), no matter how long you travel. It gets a little bit more complicated if taking more than one journey - with the new 'Hopper Fare' you can make unlimited journeys (on busses) within one hour. A British transport enthusiast celebrated this by changing bus over twenty ...


57

I posed this question to @OdeonCinemas, @OdeonHelp and @ApolloVictoria on Twitter and received the following replies from each: Provided it doesn't create a trip hazard, or get in the way then there shouldn't be a problem. -@OdeonCinemas (source) As long as it doesn't block any aisles you will be fine :) -@OdeonHelp (source) So small bags in the ...


56

Geneva airport punches a little above its weight (population) because the city hosts many international organisations (it's the UN most important location after New York and was the League of Nations seat before that) and some banking and other services for the rich and famous. Many powerful wealthy people from Europe, the Middle East and Africa have villas ...


55

I can reassure you that eating alone anywhere in London is not perceived as out of the ordinary. Any place you want to have lunch/dinner of just a coffee they will serve you with out any hesitation. London is a very busy city, individuals eating alone is common especially in the city centre where most businesses are placed.


55

Short answer: The pink oyster reader did function correctly, in the sense that it has registered your journey as one that avoids zone 1. However, since you used a Southern service in between your journey, you are charged a mixed Transport for London (TfL) + National Rail (NR) fare instead, which is slightly more expensive than a TfL only journey. The ...


53

Yes, it's doable. Although going through central London isn't the fastest route from Heathrow to Gatwick, you have lots of time so it's not an unreasonable route to take. You could obviously do it all by taxi, but it's also possible (and much cheaper) on public transport. You can get the underground from Heathrow to Green Park, which will take about 50 min,...


50

What ticket do I need to travel in the centre all day? Is there a top-up card I can use? If you are just traveling for one day you have a few main options. Buy a paper travelcard for the zones you want to travel in. Buy an Oyster card, top it up with pay as you go credit and take advantage of the daily cap. Use your contactless credit/debit card for pay as ...


50

The stop button is exactly there to ask the driver to stop at the next stop. If you can't get to a button, please politely request someone and they will be happy to press it for you. Here is some interesting insight that could help you. The following information comes from the Big Red Book, which is the official instructions guide for TFL Bus drivers. As ...


50

I have not been to London with kids but according to my experience there are plenty of public toilets available. Most parks have facilities that include a café and toilets. In the city there are toilets on most big squares. There's always a McDonald's restaurant nearby where you can go. One advise is not secret but always given: go to a museum. In many ...


49

If you are not time sensitive, then Eurostar Snap is an option. You pick a day and either morning or afternoon and then get told the train time the day before. (It lets them fill empty seats.) There are seats at £25 within the next couple of weeks, and that leaves you in central London/Paris.


48

Because Kings Cross station is one of the handful of big stations both owned and managed by the infrastructure operator Network Rail, the best source of information isn't National Rail Enquires (as normally would be the case), but Network Rail's own station page for Kings Cross, and more specifically the Kings Cross station facilities page This contains ...


47

London cabs will usually have additional seats in the back which fold up when not in use. This allows up to 5 people to ride in the back. Like below:


45

The Walkie-Talkie (20 Fenchurch St) is only the 13th-tallest building in London at 160m height, but it does have a free viewing gallery (height 155m): The famous enlarged glass dome of 20 Fenchurch Street is dedicated to three storeys of exquisitely landscaped public gardens and London’s most exclusive social spaces, including observation decks and an ...


45

All large stores will close on Christmas day because of the Christmas Day (Trading) Act 2004, which requires stores larger than a certain size to close for the day. However, you will find that most smaller independent "convenience" stores will stay open, especially in London due to the high level of multi-culturalism that exists in the city - non-Christians ...


41

The park is free. You can stand outside the gate and see the meridian, or pay 10 pounds to enter the observatory. It's 9 quid if you book online. More information: https://www.rmg.co.uk/plan-your-visit/tickets-prices


40

Let's assume that "London" is any major mainline station - they're all reasonably central and well-connected for onward journeys - and that you're only interested in rail not buses or taxis. All but one (Luton) have a station connected directly to the airport, though getting out of the terminal and to the station is quicker for some than for others. I haven'...


39

Most villages/towns/cities have signs saying "Welcome to {name of village/town/city}", but they (almost exclusively) don't have populations on them in the UK. When you drive along motorways, like the M4, you don't go into any villages/towns/ cities, so you don't see the "Welcome to {name of village/town/city}" signs. You do see "Welcome to {name of county}" ...


38

The Heron Tower (also known as the Salesforce Tower) is the 3rd tallest building in Greater London with a roof height of 202m, and has a restaurant & bar at 175m / 574ft called Duck and Waffle. Entry to the bar is free, and open to the public.


38

For the most part, tube trains travel on the left. So, if you have a reference to the other platform, you can deduce in which direction the train will be travelling. On a few of the older cut-and-cover lines, we have two tracks running down the middle with platforms on either side (i.e., you can look across the tracks and see the other platform). For ...


37

I think the information being shown on Google is correct (although could be clearer) And you are correct that Hillingdon is a tube station. So what is happening? Currently (23rd, 24th, 30th December) engineering works are taking place which means GWR are unable to operate trains from Slough to Paddington. Rail replacement buses are operating between Slough ...


36

I lived in London for four years. Perhaps I just didn't appreciate it, but I can't say I really was that aware of the class system on a day-to-day basis. Sure, you were aware that in Peckham in South London there tended to be a lower socio-economic 'category' of people than say, Kensington. And yes in Mayfair there were the private members' clubs and ...


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