106

You won't win any fashion contests, but that's not what you're aiming for anyway. I can't tell you anything about East Asia, but I've travelled plenty around Europe (including Eastern Europe). Jeans might be more common, but there's absolutely nothing unusual or inappropriate about wearing sweatpants for a flight, regardless of your gender. It certainly won'...


97

You can "simulate" renting some warm clothing in Frankfurt. There is an Oxfam shop in Sachsenhausen, about a 20 - 25 minute walk or about EUR 12 for a taxi from the central train station. Oxfam is a charity that sells used clothing (among other things) for a very cheap price. Assuming that warmth takes priority over fashion and you are flexible on size, ...


90

If you're willing to pay a bit to avoid hassle, Frankfurt Airport has 5 shower facilities scattered throughout its terminals that can be rented for 6 euros. The stalls aren't exactly luxurious, but they're fully separated, private and kept very clean, so you can change in comfort and take a shower if you feel like it. Most larger airports worldwide offer ...


61

Wash them in the sink before you sleep, let them dry as much as possible until the morning, if they are not dry by then, iron them a bit and they will be dry. If you can't get a hold of an iron, put them in front of the A/C or the heater, do not block the airway totally, just let the air pass through the boxers and it will make them dry in no time.


53

JPatokal gives the answer for FRA, but in every restroom in every US airport there is a handicapped stall, where it is easy to change, and typically two clothing hooks to help you.


48

Given that some airlines even give you a complimentary pyjama when flying in first class I'd say that it would be perfectly legal for you to wear one on the plane regardless of which class you're flying in. Worst case scenario you'll get some looks from other passengers. Go ahead and fly comfortable.


46

Right after security checks (at least in the terminal I used) there were two changing rooms that are probably used for extra security checks. I asked the security staff if I could use it to get changed and their response was "sure, of course" so I went ahead and did. Indeed nobody even seemed to care. The changing room featured a chair, enough space and ...


45

France does not really have one national costume. There are many regional costumes, although not many or even non is/are still used as daily dress. In the last half of the 20th century, the 'typical' French male item was a beret. And it is still used as a cartoon image for the French. If you are on the French coast you will likely also see a lot of ...


43

According to the Canada Border Services Agency: Many different kinds of items can introduce foreign threats into Canada. These include things as diverse as: Food, such as raw or cooked meats, fruit/vegetables, milk; Homemade articles, such as items made from plants or wood; Houseplants; Live animals, including pets; Firewood; Plant ...


35

Whenever the topic of packing something in an optimal way comes up, it's useful to see if the Navy has anything to say about it. The Navy is a good place to look because sailors need to be especially diligent about packing economically, and women sailors are no exception. Specifically, women in the US Navy are issued 11 bras and should have 2 in their ...


33

Well, about changing clothes in Kerala, to stay fresh and hygienic you will need to do it twice in a day to be frank. Once after taking bath, and once may be before going to bed. So there is no way you could not get stinky without changing clothes after every bath. Doing laundry by hand is not such a bad thing. Maybe this is the time when you can learn ...


33

I'm surprised that nobody mentioned the infamous "flip them around" technique. Arguably you can use one pair of boxers for four days if you flip them inside out and front to back. Indeed boxers, and tighty-whities, have two degrees of freedom which produce four possible rotations. This doesn't really work with thongs due to the difference in surface area ...


32

Funnily enough, there's no scientifically exact solution to this - it's known as the Knapsack problem and is considered to be NP-complete - it is expected that no algorithm can be both correct and fast (polynomial-time) on ALL cases. But naturally there are tips and suggestions to help guide you towards an optimal solution. Running shoes, it's good to ...


32

You don't need a hat. If you're traveling for business and are in the IT industry, you'll spend all your time in air-conditioned offices, hotels and taxis, and will spend very little time outside. As a rule, only the poor walk in India, and the campuses of Indian IT firms are generally in suburbs that are virtually unreachable by public transport anyway. ...


32

It's always worth having some extra clothing in your hand luggage -- you've noticed luggage can go missing and even shopping for replacements can be problematic if you're not prepared for the conditions on arrival. A thin fleece and thermal layers don't take up much room. In fact they can be stuffed in the pockets of a coat suitable for the cold end of ...


31

What people usually do is putting on their boxers/underwear in the shower cubicle then come out and put on the rest. Some people do what Burhan described in the other answer as well.


30

I'll try to address this question impartially despite my strong feelings against Mandatory Hijaab for women (I'm a male, born and raised in Iran who lives in United States now) I'll define the terms first and then will mention what is minimally required by the law. Hijaab (means veil in Arabic) is a religious term. It's definition varies across cultures, ...


29

From Saint-Peter's Basilica site:


28

Whilst Google has a few references on the topic (most of which date back a couple years ago), some of which do mention some sort of implicit association between white trousers and being gay, I think this belief is no more than an urban legend. I lived in London for a long time, I have several gay friends, and I have never heard them mention this, as well as ...


28

Consider that an ironing board is just a firm surface. I frequently use a folded towel on a desk, or even bed, while traveling.


28

In all the hotels I have stayed in, either there is an iron and ironing board already in the room, or I can call the front desk and one will be delivered to my room. As for long term apartment usage - consider the price of an iron vs how long you will stay there. If an iron costs $20 and you are there for 2 months then buy a new iron and consider the price ...


27

That's absolutely OK. Moreover, Russians' concept of appropriate clothing in trains is very relaxed; many people will wear clothing that they will never wear in many other public places (such as old worn shirt or tracksuit-like trousers, etc.) Of course, this depends on the class, in the platzkart (3rd class) passengers have most relaxed clothing, while the ...


26

I was surprised to discover that a long sleeved "technical" shirt with a high Sun Protection Factor (SPF) kept me much cooler (and reduced the amount of water I needed to drink while cycling) than a cotton T shirt. It's 100% recycled polyester, so there is more to this than just what it's made of. I tested this out cycling a specific route near my home. In ...


25

For the general area, there's no dress code - you even see people wandering through in their swimming gear after they've been in the pool! I've been in wearing t-shirt and jeans, feeling under-dressed until I saw the tourists in their t-shirt and shorts with flip-flops. However, you may wish to consider what else you want to do in Vegas, and dress ...


25

It varies, and flight attendants will often alter it over the course of longer flights as well (for example, on overnight flights they often turn up the temperature by a degree or two). Often there are drafts from the air conditioning, although it's hard to predict exactly where unless you often sit in the same seat on the same plane. The traditional and ...


24

In the olden days you did do laundry with bar soap - but it was laundry bar soap - harsher and unscented. You can still get it in Mexico and probably lots of places. I guess "hand soap" as it is (or was) usually called differs mainly by being more expensive and probably has ingredients to be less harsh on the skin, and it's usually scented. Whether any of ...


24

I haven't traveled to east Asia or East Europe before but that is a very long flight, I don't think jeans are comfortable at all for that many hours. I have though traveled to central Europe several times and have never worn anything other than sweatpants and nothing has happened, even though they usually don't trust travelers from my country easily. It ...


23

There is for example this company that has a website where they list all the coin-laundries (コインランドリー). You will have to know how to read addresses in Japanese at least to use this. There are tons of others, also usually found in remote areas: coin-laundry.co.jp ciao-net.jp mocomoco-jp.com super-laundry.net (google for コインランドリー 店舗一覧 to find more) In terms ...


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