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I had a work visa in the UK which I left midway to return to America for personal circumstances and to update my ID.

It’s now been 1 year I’ve been out of the UK, but my visa originally expired 3 months ago as of today’s date. I’m considering flying to the UK with a return ticket for a few months for tourism and to visit my partner, attend a wedding and visit friends.

My partner of 7 years who I met in the US (we lived together in the US and England) has booked me a return flight from London to Australia and back for a month and a half to travel . I’m planning to go to the UK for just under 6 months and also explain my trip to Australia mid way during the time I intend to stay.

  1. I’m a bit nervous because I left the UK mid-way during my 2 year working visa and not sure if that’s looked down upon.

  2. My partner (British citizen) plans to get married to me in the US and live here as we’re not interested in settling in the UK so marriage route there isn’t the idea.

  3. I have enough savings to provide I can look after myself.

  4. I will have a return ticket to America and I’ve got the return flight to Australia and itinerary which shows my intent to travel.

Basically with all these factors, being out of the UK for 1 year despite my visa ending 3 months ago... is it a good idea to book a return to England for 6 months, in which 1.5 months I’ll have a return to Australia?

I’m genuinely going for tourism and intend on traveling a lot during my hopeful stay.

closed as unclear what you're asking by Mark Mayo Jul 20 '18 at 4:57

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    Was your work visa not officially curtailed when you left employment in the UK? – nkjt Jun 14 '18 at 14:12
  • Your visit premise is to maintain your relationship; that's a legit reason and pretending otherwise at entry (sounds as though you're a visa-free national) can cause problems (both short, such as entry denial or limited permission, and long, such as required to apply for entry visa in future). – Giorgio Jun 14 '18 at 15:56
  • OP has not returned to clarify comments. Putting on hold for now. – Mark Mayo Jul 20 '18 at 4:57