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In Florida, foreign nationals can drive cars with their International Driver's Licence.

My brother is visiting me here in Florida and he asked if he can drive my car.

What would happen if I gave him - a foreign national on a tourist visa - permission to drive my car, which has coverage for other drivers, and he got in an accident? Or even worse, hurt someone and that person is suing him?

Should I scare, discourage or just outright prevent him from driving my car?

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    You need at least to say what country you atr in and perhaps where he is from. Generally - if a person is not covered by insurance for damage or injury that they cause then it can be extremely costly worst case. || In addition, as owner of the car you may be responsible for the cost and/or legal consequences if he does not or cannot pay and may be legally liable for penalties quite regardless of money aspects. Your profile says you are in USA. I have no related expertise but expect that the potential consequences COULD be immense. At an absolute minimum he should be covered by .... – Russell McMahon Aug 14 '15 at 4:04
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    ... relevant accident and liability insurance. | The minimum cost he (and or you) could be liable for is complete replacement cost of an "up market" vehicle if he was in the wrong in an accident", and above that could be liable for personal damages which in the US can easily be hundreds of thousands of dollars and perhaps millions. || ie IT IS AN EXTREMELY BAD IDEA UNLESS FULLY COVERED BY INSURANCE AND EVEN THEN MAY BE IF HE IS NOT USED TO US CONDITIONS. – Russell McMahon Aug 14 '15 at 4:08
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IT IS AN EXTREMELY BAD IDEA UNLESS FULLY COVERED BY INSURANCE AND EVEN THEN MAY BE A VERY BAD IDEA IF HE IS NOT USED TO US CONDITIONS

You need to be absolutely certain that your "coverage for other drivers" does in fact cover him fully. There will be requirements re drivers licence that he must meet (not only will he need to have one but will probably need to have it with him) and if he has had accidents or convictions or certain medical or health conditions he may not be covered. You MUST NOT ASSUME he is covered. Specific checking with your insurance company is essential and having their agreement and terms in writing is "immensely wise". If you are 'scared' to do this because they MAY say no you will be even sorrier if they decline cover after an accident.

If a person is not covered by insurance for damage or injury that they cause then it can be extremely costly worst case and even in extremely minor accidenrts can cost thousands of dollars.

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In addition, as owner of the car you may be responsible for the cost and/or legal consequences if he does not or cannot pay and may be legally liable for penalties quite regardless of money aspects. Your profile says you are in USA. I have no related expertise but expect that the potential consequences COULD be immense. At an absolute minimum he should be covered by relevant accident and liability insurance.

Generally insurance cover for tourists is an extra cost and he is liable to need cover that is specifically relevant.

The minimum cost he (and or you) could be liable for is complete replacement cost of an "up market" vehicle if he was in the wrong in an accident", and above that could be liable for personal damages which in the US can easily be hundreds of thousands of dollars and perhaps millions.

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    Isn't this a little over-alarmist? For example in Poland, any third-party only insurance (which any vehicle has obligatorily) applies to the vehicle, regardless of whoever is driving it. I could borrow the vehicle to whomever, or even a martian, and it would still cover any damage inflicted by the vehicle to third parties, so the above is a non-issue. Aren't these rules similar worldwide? – yannn Oct 21 '16 at 12:40
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    @OmegaTerus - To answer your two specific questions.: (1) No (2) No. || In eg Australia the insurance terms are extremely onerous, ALL contain fine print which can lead to you being responsible for paying for the whole vehicle. BUT take out insurance cover for the same hire vehicle with the SAME insurance company before leaving New Zealand and the cost is lower AND the onerous terms vanish. Really. – Russell McMahon Oct 21 '16 at 14:24
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    @OmegaTerus No, this is really a good advice. I've been a driver in Florida, and my colleagues have some issues with insurance companies in such case. It can be really costly, as different insurance agencies do or do not cover the other drivers, especially the tourist from other country – VMAtm Oct 26 '17 at 22:45
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    Our UK insurance is specifically for myself and my wife to drive our two cars. Other people can be added for extra cost. We chose our current insurer because they would allow us to add our US-based son-in-law to the insurance when he visits - our previous insurers would only add holders of UK driving licences. Bottom line: always check, driving uninsured is a very bad idea. – djna Oct 27 '17 at 16:08
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    In US states liability insurance is for the car and generally covers any person driving the car except perhaps those who live in the same household as the driver(s) listed on the policy. This is required by state law (though I don't know Florida law specifically this seems to be a pretty universal requirement in the US), so it seems a certainty that if the car is properly insured a visitor legally driving the car will be covered by that insurance. Because of this I'm not sure it is possible to buy separate coverage for a tourist in the US. – Dennis Oct 27 '17 at 18:05

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