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The list of banned items is extensive, but what happens if you have a genuine need to carry something banned? The carry-on specific items is easy enough, you just check it (e.g. sharp objects), but some items (e.g. chlorine, some aerosols, gas torches or many other such objects) which might genuinely be needed for work, are banned in either form.

Is there a process to getting an exemption to carry banned items, and if so, what/where is it?

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    If they are banned, they are banned. If you need something on the list for work or other such use at your end destination, then it will likely need to be shipped by a method other than in your baggage. Many things banned by TSA are also banned by the FAA which means they can only go by ground means (trucks, trains, surface mail). – user13044 Dec 15 '15 at 6:45
  • @Tom, surely there are cases where you can apply for an exemption?? A blanket ban seems unusual, even for the TSA. – Mark Mayo Dec 15 '15 at 6:47
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    In a majority of cases, it will be easier to buy the banned item at your destination, isn't it? – orique Dec 15 '15 at 7:26
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    For the UK, the first step (and most important step) is to get a license. Assuming you are interested in sanctioned firearms, the guidance for making an application is here: gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/… It is rigorous to the extreme. Once you have a license, there are paths opened for you that lead to transport and logistics. – Gayot Fow Dec 15 '15 at 7:52
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    @GayotFow - in the US (which Mark specified) firearms are allowed as checked baggage already, no need for an exemption. – user13044 Dec 15 '15 at 8:09
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There are a few exceptions that I know of from the TSA, and these have to do with medication or disability assistance equipment; and children's formula baby food, etc. (for the liquid restriction).

All other prohibitions are not subject to exemptions. This is because some of the items are classified as hazardous material (HAZMAT) that need to carried by certified companies/equipment; in other cases it is banned by the FAA for safety; and finally because it can be considered a weapon.

Your only recourse - if the item cannot be checked in, is to have it shipped to your destination as cargo - and if it is hazmat it may not even be allowed to fly and will have to be driven there.

  • Many hazardous material are rejected in ocean containers as well. – gerrit Dec 15 '15 at 11:32
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    @gerrit they're rejected by most shipping companies because they don't have the equipment, trained staff, and permits to handle them. Contract a company that has those and you can ship them, which will of course be more expensive than taking the cheapest offer and may take longer. – jwenting Dec 15 '15 at 11:36
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    In some cases, your only recourse may in fact be to purchase it at your destination. – CGCampbell Dec 19 '15 at 15:29

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