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This question already has an answer here:

Have been in Malta for over 90 days (since 28th Sept 2014) - though received a residence permit which expires 5th February.

Does this mean I cannot visit any other Schengen areas after this date?

My return flight leaves from Rome on February 20th and I was planning on visiting Spain, Hungary and The Netherlands before then.

marked as duplicate by JonathanReez, JoErNanO, Ali Awan, Giorgio, CGCampbell Feb 17 '17 at 17:36

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    You can visit Schengen following the expiry of a residence permit. The Schengen clock does not tick when you have a residence permit. It starts ticking when the permit expires (and at that point your 90 days will begin). – Gayot Fow Jan 7 '15 at 0:46
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    @pnuts, it's theoretical because a residence permit duration is normally 6 months or more. Haven't seen one for less than that, but if a residence permit was less than 6 months, then indeed visiting time would count. For sure. – Gayot Fow Jan 7 '15 at 1:47
  • In fact the residence permit would need to be shorter than three months for earlier stays to have any effect. – Relaxed Jan 7 '15 at 13:24
  • See also travel.stackexchange.com/questions/10504/… and travel.stackexchange.com/questions/11250/… (it might not be entirely obvious because the citizenship of the person in question and the countries involved are not the same but the answer to this question applies to you as well). – Relaxed Jan 7 '15 at 13:27
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    @dlanod, I cobbled it in. It might get a Revival Badge. Overall though, I had completely forgotten about this question. – Gayot Fow Feb 23 '15 at 4:58
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You can visit Schengen following the expiry of a residence permit. The Schengen clock does not tick when you have a residence permit. It starts ticking when the permit expires (and at that point your 90 days will begin).

I wonder whether days before a residence permit are ever added to those after to count towards 90 total?

it's theoretical because a residence permit duration is normally 6 months or more. Haven't seen one for less than that, but if a residence permit was less than 6 months, then indeed visiting time would count. For sure.

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    In principle, the Schengen clock does tick when you're in a Schengen country other than the one that issued the residence permit. (Enforcing that is of course a different matter, given that one doesn't get entry/exit stamps while moving between the permit country and the rest of Schengen). The most succinct way to phrase it might be that a residence permit makes the issuing country count as "not in Schengen" for Schengen-clock purposes; otherwise the clock keeps ticking normally. – Henning Makholm Feb 23 '15 at 19:42
  • @HenningMakholm, superb phrasing. Makes the distinction much clearer. – Gayot Fow Feb 24 '15 at 6:55

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