4

If one has a Irish visa, can one travel to Northern Ireland on an Irish visa?

What if one wants to visit both the Republic Of Ireland and Northern Island?

5

This is generally not possible, as visas for the CTA are not valid for both countries :

You cannot travel to Northern Ireland using an Irish visa, except if travelling under the British Irish Visa Scheme (explained above). You need a visa issued by the United Kingdom.

If you travel from the Republic of Ireland to Northern Ireland and then wish to return to the Republic, you must have a Multiple Entry visa (explained below).

If you are a Chinese or Indian citizen living in your respective country then the situation may be different, but for most nationalities you need a visa for both countries.

| improve this answer | |
  • A traveler who requires a visa for Ireland but does not require a visa for the UK may do so, however. – phoog Jan 19 at 17:01
3

No, with the default Irish Visit (Tourist) Visa you cannot enter the United Kingdom (including Northern Ireland).

Only with a visa issued against the British Irish Visa Scheme or a combination of Irish and UK Visitor visa is traveling between the Irish Republic and the United Kingdom possible.

Note:
The Common Travel Area rules apply mainly to Irish and British Citizens

  • and not to foriegners.

During your stay in Ireland
Travel to Northern Ireland & United Kingdom You cannot travel to Northern Ireland using an Irish visa, except if travelling under the British Irish Visa Scheme (explained above). You need a visa issued by the United Kingdom.

If you travel from the Republic of Ireland to Northern Ireland and then wish to return to the Republic, you must have a Multiple Entry visa (explained below).


Sources:

| improve this answer | |
  • There's another scenario in which it is possible, which is a traveler who has an Irish visa and is exempt from the visitor visa requirement in the UK. – phoog Jan 19 at 17:02
  • @phoog One should also add that under such conditions the leave to enter is only 3 months after entry into the UK (proof of date of entry is advised) instead of the default 6 months. – Mark Johnson Jan 19 at 20:47
  • I was under the impression that the limit was then three months in the common travel area (in which case no proof of entry into the UK would be needed because the Irish entry stamp establishes the relevant date). – phoog Jan 19 at 23:55
  • @phoog No, it is for a period not exceeding 6 months. The 3 months in defined in Article 4 (4)(a) The Immigration (Control of Entry through Republic of Ireland) Order 1972. – Mark Johnson Jan 20 at 1:27

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