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So, I have citizenship to two countries, one being the USA which requires a visa. I am currently living in another country of which I also have citizenship which does not require a visa. I would prefer not to waste my time and work going to the consulate just for a question.

I know I can enter Russia on the passport I have in this country but am I required by law to disclose my US citizenship? They would be able to tell that I am not a natural citizen of this country without the visa given that my English and accent will be as if I just arrived from the USA.

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    As a side note, many, if not most, non-native English speakers "sound American" so I don't think you will sound too unusual :)
    – josh
    Sep 10, 2018 at 14:51
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    @josh to an American ear, very few non-native English speakers sound American, if any.
    – phoog
    Sep 10, 2018 at 15:22
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    Maybe, but I doubt there will be many American's working at Russia's border control.
    – josh
    Sep 10, 2018 at 15:25
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    My point is, if Gregorsky provides a valid passport for vista free entry, an American sounding English speaking accent will not likely prompt the question of "Are you American?".
    – josh
    Sep 10, 2018 at 15:27
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    @josh I don't think any native English speaker would think that non-native speakers generally "sound American", so it would be strange if non-native speakers think they do. Especially since non-native speakers don't seem to have a hard time distinguishing British accents from American ones. Sep 10, 2018 at 16:36

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Even if you had to disclose your US citizenship (which you don't), it won't make you ineligible for visa-free entry with your other passport. Why would it?

Citizenship is not a taint, as in, you are "tainted" with US citizenship and therefore require a visa. Citizenship is a grant, as in, if you're granted "some country" citizenship you don't require a visa.

I know that some Middle Eastern states see citizenship as a taint vs. Israel, but this is not the case generally and this isn't the case with Russia.

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    While this is true as a general rule, and I suppose it probably is also true in this specific case, it isn't universally true. A country can make a rule that citizens of country X require a visa regardless of other citizenships. One country that has made such a rule is the US.
    – phoog
    Sep 10, 2018 at 15:25
  • "Why would it?" Why wouldn't it? If citizens of country X require a visa and citizens of country Y don't, it would make just as much sense for either one could take priority for X-Y dual nationals. Sep 10, 2018 at 16:30
  • @DavidRicherby For starters, there's a solid, legally binding, proof of first citizenship at immigration booth, but there's no proof of dual nationality. If there's a country with which you have bilateral agreement to accept each other's citizens without visa, and then you don't let a person with their passport in for handwavy reasons, that's a transgression of agreement.
    – alamar
    Sep 10, 2018 at 16:33
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    "Even if you had to disclose your US citizenship (which you don't)" Incorrect! Russia specifically has reporting requirements and it is a criminal offense to knowingly conceal dual citizenship.
    – user71659
    Sep 10, 2018 at 19:45
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    @user71659 It's a criminal offense for Russians to knowingly conceal dual citizenship -- this is not the same at all as requiring visitors to. Sep 10, 2018 at 20:59

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