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I am planning to apply for a spouse visa in Europe. 1 year ago I tried to use false documentation to enter Europe out of pressure and desperation and got detained by immigration in Europe. I was told that I have been given a ban in Europe and in any schengen countries. I was not deported and was let free to leave the country voluntarily. Will this have any effect on my future travel to Europe?

closed as unclear what you're asking by mkennedy, Newton, Ali Awan, David Richerby, MadHatter Sep 6 '18 at 9:49

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    If you actually have a ban from the Schengen area, then yes, that would kind of affect your ability to travel there ... – Roddy of the Frozen Peas Sep 6 '18 at 1:38
  • @RoddyoftheFrozenPeas unless the spouse is an EU citizen or a national of an EEA country or Switzerland who lives in a country other than his or her country of nationality. – phoog Sep 6 '18 at 1:40
  • Well since the asker seems to have disassociated him/herself from the question, I don't think we'll ever know. But the ban would definitely also affect future travels to other countries, such as when applying for visas, and would definitely reflect negatively on their character in the process making it less likely they would receive such a visa in the future. – Roddy of the Frozen Peas Sep 6 '18 at 1:42
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    If I were in charge of granting a visa, residence permit or even citizenship in this case, I would be wondering if the relationship is really genuine. Not saying it isn’t, but be prepared for a lot of suspicion and checks. – jcaron Sep 6 '18 at 7:28
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There are two entirely different kind of "family" visa.

  • One is when a family member of an EU/EEA citizen wants to accompany the citizen while the citizen travels under freedom of movement to a different EU country. Those are under EU rules. We can answer questions on those.
  • One is when a family member of an EU/EEA citizen wants to live with the family in the country of citizenship. Those are under national rules. Questions can be answered on Expatriates stack exchange.

Living with the family is seen as an important human right of the EU citizen (or other resident, but less so). But it is not absolute, and being caught in a lie will certainly hurt.