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My application for my UK visa was just refused and I'm in a state. It's going to ruin my holiday that I've planned to Iceland. I incorrectly submitted my credit card statement as proof of my financial situation. It was rejected and they also said my letter of employment was not supported by proof of bank deposits.

So, I'm going to apply again, this time with my bank statements showing salary deposits. However, I am also taking out a bank loan to buy a car and have some spending money for the trip. Will this deposit into my account look suspicious to the officer reviewing my second attempt at a visa?

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    Yes, it will look suspicious, especially if you don't even have enough money to afford the trip without taking a loan. – Roddy of the Frozen Peas Apr 19 '18 at 6:48
  • @T.Kilian Is Iceland your final destination? You should obtain your entry visa for Iceland first in that case. – Traveller Apr 19 '18 at 7:29
  • As @Traveller says, if you have already obtained an Iceland visa, have confirmed (and better still prepaid) flights and accommodation, the loan may actually add some support to your application. Assuming that you have at least some evidence of the loan, that the majority of your loan has already been used to purchase a car, that you can prove ownership of the car, and that there is a clear pattern of deposits and withdrawals from your account consistent with salaried employment and local financial obligations (rent, utilities, etc.) The loan amount should also not be beyond your means. – PassKit Apr 19 '18 at 9:17
  • In what way will the loan add support to my application? I don't think I understand. Is it because if I am able to get a loan from a bank then they don't see me as a risk? And this is how it will add support? – T. Kilian Apr 19 '18 at 10:00
  • How long are you planning on staying in the UK? Is this just a transit visa to get you to iceland? – DJClayworth Apr 19 '18 at 13:26
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There is an excellent answer about Funds Parking, Lifestyle, and Credibility here, including how bank statements affect the decision process UK visa refusal on V 4.2 a + c (and sometimes 'e') As others have commented, a sudden bank loan shortly before submitting a visa application will be viewed with suspicion, especially if your financial circumstances don’t readily demonstrate that you can afford the trip without recourse to the loan. If you reapply to the U.K., or indeed any of your intended destination(s), on the basis you describe, you are risking a tail-spin of refusals.

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First, make sure you are applying for the correct visa. If you are only transiting through the UK, you need to apply for the transit visa and not the full fledged visitor visa.

Transit visa requirements are lot simpler than visit visa requirements.

It might also be simpler to just transit through a Schengen member state. As you already have a visa for your destination country, there are no further visa requirements for you.

If you have obtained a loan, you need to submit loan papers, and if you have bought a vehicle with that loan, you should submit a bill of sale along with that. Otherwise your application will most likely be rejected for funds parking - which is when people artificially inflate their bank accounts (by borrowing and depositing funds) in order to show a better financial position than they really have, in hopes of securing a visa.

In fact, any large deposits of funds should be accompanied by an explanatory note. For example if you just received your annual bonus or a commission from a large sale, you should explain that. If you have irregular income (freelancer, salesman working on commission, etc.) you should also explain that.

  • Thanks. I’m not transiting, I’m visiting my cousin first and doing some sightseeing. I’m going to hold off on the loan because I don’t need it to afford the holiday, it’s only to buy a car. I was only considering it to support my application. Seems like it’s a bad idea. – T. Kilian Apr 20 '18 at 14:58

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