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I'm a US Permanent resident green card holder, planning to visit Canada in December. I'm in the middle of renewing my green card (Expiration date 12/17/17 but get extension until Aug 2018 when I applied for renewal). If I apply eTA with my current green card, do I have to re-apply another eTA if i receive my new green card before my travel date?

  • It's a good question, but if I were you I would just plan to apply for a new eTA in that case to be on the safe side, because the cost is so low. Also, the number they ask for is your alien registration number, or A number, which will not change. The only thing that will change is the expiration date of your green card. – phoog Oct 16 '17 at 18:19
  • Beware that you only need an eTA if flying. If entering by land, you just need your green card (no, not even a passport) – Crazydre Dec 17 '17 at 22:59
  • Your A number will never change. You don't need a new eTA unless you get a new passport. – Michael Hampton Dec 18 '17 at 0:29
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As written by @phoog:

It's a good question, but if I were you I would just plan to apply for a new eTA in that case to be on the safe side, because the cost is so low. Also, the number they ask for is your alien registration number, or A number, which will not change. The only thing that will change is the expiration date of your green card.

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I believe the ETA attaches to the foreign passport and when you get a new passport, you need a new ETA.

The green card / A# is just to verify your status in the USA as there are special rules for USA permanent residents.

My partner did not have to show her American green card to Canadian immigration when she entered from the USA.

  • Does your partner's passport enable visa-free entry to Canada? A US permanent resident who is a citizen of a country whose nationals otherwise do require a visa would, I expect, have to show the green card at immigration. – phoog Nov 17 '17 at 19:06
  • Visa free but requires an ETA. – RoboKaren Nov 17 '17 at 19:08
  • Of course. But US LPRs from visa-required countries are also visa-free despite their citizenship because of their LPR status in the US. Such a person would probably have to show the green card. Or, to look at it another way, someone who is visa-free even without being a US permanent resident does not need to worry about "special rules," and the ETA form does not even ask such a person whether they are an LPR, let alone ask them for the green card number. – phoog Nov 17 '17 at 19:52

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