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95

When I flew from Vienna to Amsterdam and back, my fears were confirmed: The security staff inspected me very precise, and I had to explain them my story. Thank god I have some scars left so they believed me! It is not a problem. There are many, many people with metal implants and the standard procedure is simply explaining your condition after an ...


63

The EU policy is crystal clear: passengers must be given the possibility of opting out from a security scanner. In this case the passenger shall be screened by an alternative screening method including at least a hand search; The UK government, as usual in its bizarre anti freedom ways, tried to resist opt outs going so far in 2010, per this Guardian ...


57

The FAA regulation has this to say: If requested by passengers, their photographic equipment and film packages shall be inspected without exposure to an X-ray system. I am unaware of any official TSA word on this but it'd be very hard to imagine them contradicting the FAA. Anything is a "photographic equipment" if you try hard enough. First ask politely ...


31

Seems unlikely it's anything more than normal electrostatic discharge. The fact that it only affects you could be related to your clothes or shoes (especially if they are made of synthetic fibers). I also wonder whether the moving conveyor belt could be acting as a Van de Graff generator. Do you not get shocks like that under other circumstances? (I live ...


29

Millions of smartphones and 10's (if not 100's) of thousands of Kindles/E-book readers go through airport scanners every day. So far I believe the number that have apparently been damaged by airport scanner stands at about 2 for Kindle, and I've never heard of a smartphone being damaged by any form of scanners. (And in the case of the Kindles there's ...


28

X Rays don't penetrate metal. Circuit boards have a lot of metal and solder, making it easy to conceal items within. If the TSA can't see it, they get nervous. Hence the 'take out your laptop.' (Why they don't require that of iPads, I don't know.) Now, all this being said, you can get bags that have laptop compartments. The only requirement is that ...


23

Screening at the gate is done at a number of other major airports, including Singapore Changi, Kuala Lumpur International, etc. And it has one massive advantage from the airport operator's point of view: you don't need to separate arrivals and departures. This means that instead of essentially duplicating all routes to the aircraft (one for passengers ...


23

tl;dr: "I have a medical implant in my X" appears to be the magic phrase in the USA. Since 1999, I have a 12-inch titanium rod in my right femur that extends up from a full knee replacement. Contrary to previous posters, I always set off a metal detector. I fly predominantly in the USA, although my security strategy outlined below has worked everywhere I've ...


22

This is becoming more and more common with more modern surgery, and things being done that couldn't be done in the past. Naturally with increased security these days, it's also more common that you'll get picked up as having metal on/in you. There are a few things you can do (and I have personal experience with this, with quite a bit of metal in my chest): ...


21

OK, So I've never tried this with electronic equipment (which I think will make it harder). But I've flown several times with personal radiation dosimeters as required by my employment at the time. Obviously, an x-ray exposure would contribute to a recorded dose - overreporting is a much smaller problem than underreporting, but still something to be avoided....


17

While certainly not as good as Nate Eldrege's answer, I have a fairly simple solution for dealing with shocks. Whenever I determine that something is a source of electrostatic discharge, I always put my hand into a fist and discharge with the bottom of my fist (ie: the opposite side that your thumb is on). Tuck your thumb into your closed fist under your ...


17

The water (in the shape of a bottle, pouch or waterskin) will very easily be seen. Consequences would depend on what the liquid was and how convinced they were that it was an innocent mistake. You could miss your flight, or worse.


16

Is it so easy to see? It is so easy to see, if they wish to. It is not so easy for you to see if they wish to see. It is exceedingly unwise to even think about doing what you ask about. The object of the exclusions is to eliminate items which have a reasonable prospect of being energetic enough to constitute a significant explosion hazard to the aircraft ...


15

To a large extent it depends what type of knife you're talking about. Many/most ceramic knives will still contain sufficient metal to trigger a metal detector. In the case of "pocket knife" style knives, this will normally be in the body of the knife. For kitchen knives there will often be metal in the handle of the knife, and/or in the clips/screws/etc ...


14

The device in your image is most likely a Southern Scientific Pedestrian Radiation Portal Monitor. I'm only unsure of the bottom, darker protruding part, the rest looks exactly like the only image the producer released up to the position of dark spots. The machine is used to detect traces of gamma and neutron radiation, which may be a result of nuclear ...


12

Generally it's so that they can check the metal device that it is, and that nothing else is hidden in it. Same with SLR cameras on occasion, and I've been asked in the past to turn both of them on to prove they actually work. But generally they just want a clear and unobstructed view of all the workings, especially to see the harddisk platter. That caused ...


12

Keep in mind that security doesn't care about your screws. What they care about is that the rest of you is clear. When they do the scan, pointing out your belt buckle, or the metal button on your jeans isn't helpful. They need to clear the rest of you. Tell them you have screws in the shoulder. But, what this does is essentially render the walk through ...


10

There are 67,000 people in the TSA, and an increasing number of airports that opt for privatized security companies to do the job instead, so some variance will be inevitable. In your particular case, it sounds like either you've been going through the TSA Precheck line at OAK, or they're confused/lazy/running a quiet trial and applying the Precheck rules ...


10

You're overthinking it a bit, and it'll likely be no problem at all. As per the product description, they're airport safe. So you have two possible options, depending on what the airport uses. metal detector - according to the product, it won't go detect them anyway. So you're through and happy. t-wave detectors might show it, but for example, two nights ...


10

Most of countries have X-ray on custom. Just few of the countries control them systematically (or just often, many people per flights). It is not just for drugs or safety. Often is just to have a better custom control, to see if you are importing commercial stuffs, that requires taxes.


10

The same thing happens in Ecuador. All bags used to go systematically through and X-Ray machine but it took long, so now we have a light that randomly switches between red and green to tell you if you need to take your luggage through the X-Ray machine. And, yes, I had to do it in Panama too, twice. This is usually done as part of customs, so it is to check ...


9

I've had this issue at some security checkpoints and not others. The difference, in my observation, is in the conveyor belts. I've never had it happen at a checkpoint where the rollers under the belt are metal. If the rollers under the belt are plastic (I think it's Delrin or nylon), it happens very frequently. The charge is being built up by the belt vs. ...


9

You do not have to use the body scanner for TSA Pre-Check. Most of the time they don't even have the body scanner in that line. And when I go to an airport that doesn't have a separate TSA pre-check line, like LGA in NY, they give you a card that says TSA pre-check and they send you through the metal detector. Even if you don't have pre-check you can opt ...


9

I'm also an analog photographer and I develop my film myself. There's a few things you can do and as with anything it depends more on how you ask, but it's worth remembering that just like in your example if you hit a stubborn official somewhere there really is no way to go around scanning the film. It also helps to know exactly how many scans will start ...


7

Any answer is opinion. But the following seems to be in the range of possible: The short answer is, in the worst case it could have life changing (or even ending) consequences far beyond what you'd possibly wish for or imagine. While worst case is unlikely, the current world situation could produce circumstances that make you look like you may be involved ...


7

The last time I went to IST there was no xray customs inspection on the way out of the airport (if there was one I was not selected to go through it), but there is one on the way in at the airport entrance before the check in desk and a second xray scan at the real security check point. Information from July 2014


6

As @Doc said, X-ray do not damage electronic devices, however, metal detectors may. I had the personal experience of forgetting to take out my cellphone from my pocket when I went through a metal detector, and it passed way with a nasty smell of burned circuits...


6

For the United States, items are screened by the Transportation Security Administration. While I didn't find anything on their website stating a general policy for all x-ray-sensitive equipment, they do say this regarding camera film (bold emphasis in original, italics are mine): Undeveloped camera film is not prohibited, but you should only transport it ...


5

You can go by public buses to Port of Miami. I can not give you specific details since I do not know from where you will take the bus. Google Maps will offer a great help. Please note if you take a bus you will have to walk from the bus station to the terminal which is a ~10 minutes walk. It is advised to go by car and get dropped off at the terminal. You ...


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