40

Whether you need a visa to visit the US is based on your citizenship, not your residence. So, as a citizen of Turkey you will need a visa to visit the US.


20

Your Spanish work permit is not relevant and Turkey is not a US Visa Waiver country, so you need a visa to enter the United States. Here are the official details.


19

You are a non-visa national wanting to visit the UK for a job interview. You are worried (and rightfully so) that you might get some stick at the control point. The first step is to go to Appendix 3 of Appendix V called "Permitted Activities". See if what you want to do is listed (hint: it is). Make a print out of Appendix 3 with your proposed activities ...


18

There's precisely one case that I'm aware of: if you're a citizen of a country that has signed the Svalbard Treaty -- and you probably are, since signatories include most all of Europe, the US, Canada, India, China, Japan, Australia etc -- you are "allowed to become residents and to have access to Svalbard including the right to fish, hunt or undertake any ...


17

The precise answer is local law specific, but in general, you cannot work while on a tourist/business visa or visa waiver. There are outlying exceptions, but they wouldn't cover running a business. Enforcement varies by country (and some may be happy to have you there spending money, even if its not entirley within the rules), but you are running the risk of ...


15

You only need a Social Security number for working and paying taxes. If you're not yet working, you don't yet need the number. But you apply for the number, not your employer. If you're in the US in H-1B status, I believe you should be able to apply for the number now. If you're worried about not having one, just go down to the local social security ...


12

Turkish citizens do need a visa for the US, as stated in Timatic. Foreign residency is completely irrelevant


12

A seeming oasis of paperwork-free work possibilities is Georgia, a country not yet well established in the minds of travellers and tourists from the west, located between Turkey, Russia, Azerbaijan, Armenia, and the Black Sea. Now it doesn't answer the letter of your question but I believe it answers the spirit. If not to the original asker then certainly ...


10

Work visas aren't going to be given on arrival anywhere (I'd be highly surprised if they did). You'd be dealing with a lot of issues regarding taxation, potentially taking jobs away from local people, and benefits (or the lack thereof) - and Governments are starting to get really finicky about actual work visas as it is. Getting work visas, even working-...


9

I would imagine the answer here would be country-specific, but it seems that in most countries the immigration rules are not friendly to remote workers, and you do indeed need a work visa if you want to follow the letter of the law. For example, I know this could be a problem in the USA, Japan and Thailand. In Thailand, I even heard of a co-working space ...


7

If you're Australian, New Zealander or Canadian (and possibly other nationalities but I haven't looked), you can apply for a Working Holiday Visa for The Netherlands (assuming you're eligible) after you have arrived. In fact, it is preferred over applying prior to arrival. You are an Australian, Canadian or New Zealand citizen and you would like to spend ...


7

Legally speaking, yes, you probably need a visa, since you are working in Singapore and getting paid for it. In practice, since you're eligible for a 30-day visitor pass on arrival and this is a one-off, you'll be fine. In the unlikely event of being asked, you're visiting for "business meetings" and doing "sales demos" for a customer. Source: Used to ...


7

What if I exit the Schengen area and then reenter as a tourist? Yes you can do that. You must exit before or when your visa expires. Go somewhere else and then make your visa free entry request. Whether they let you in or not is just speculation at this point but if you are able to convince them to let you in, there is no rule you're breaking.


6

I've obtained several distinct work visas in Germany, all were post arrival visas. I'm an American citizen, who visited as a visiting professor, but I thought most visa waiver partners qualify under most jobs that grant work visas. You might find other German speaking or Scandinavian countries follow this rule as well, but always check with the consulate, ...


6

If you are an EU citizen you don't need any work visa to work in a EU country As an EU national, you're entitled to work — for an employer or as a self-employed person — in any EU country without needing a work permit. There are some exceptions, for example: Croatian nationals still face temporary restrictions on working in the EU.


6

Many years ago I entered the US on H-1B and managed to rent a flat, open a bank account and get telephone/cable service without applying for a SSN. Since I was being paid outside of the US still, I didn't actually need one for quite a while. Even when I got one, I still told companies that I didn't have a SSN as I didn't want to give it out unless absolutely ...


6

If you're planning to work in Australia, even remotely, a tourism or business visitor visa (subclass 600) is not appropriate. You should be applying for the subclass 400 short stay work visa instead, sponsored by your employer: https://www.homeaffairs.gov.au/trav/visa-1/400- This lets you work legally in Australia for up to three months, or in limited ...


5

The official page is the United Kingdom Working Holiday Scheme page. Working Holiday visa holders from the UK are an exception to the usual rules, where you are able to extend your total stay to 23 months (the normal maximum for visitors from most other countries is 12 months without the ability to extend). The only restrictions on employment are: ...


5

Here is the UK border agency's guide for the Intra-Company Transfer Tier 2 visa. You can download the policy guidance PDF from the link on the right hand side of the page. Page 52 of that PDF says the following: Absences from the UK 223. The UK, Channel Islands, Isle of Man and Republic of Ireland form a common travel area. If you leave this area ...


5

Yes, you can. I have applied for a business visa while having a still valid visitor visa. Please note that for US citizens China issues a 10 year visitor visas, so according to the friend one could not visit China for any non-tourist purpose without either visiting China as a tourist, or waiting for ten years. This does not make any practical sense.


5

Let's start by clearing up some confusion. ESTA is just permission to get on a plane to the US. The thing that admits you to the US is called the Visa Waiver Program (VWP). When googling what you are allowed to do, search for VWP, not ESTA. (To be fair, lots of people say ESTA when they mean VWP). Being British you are (very probably) eligible for VWP. VWP ...


5

You do not have to be registered to invite a performer to visit on a Permitted Paid Engagement Visa https://www.gov.uk/permitted-paid-engagement-visa


5

As far as German law is concerned, you have not been charged or convicted of a crime or misdemeanor yet. Those 60 euros you paid are not a fine, they are an increased fare. The police will investigate (i.e. write up what you and the conductor said) and pass the information to the prosecution, which has the options of charging you (Anklage), offering a plea ...


5

US embassies do not issue work permits. They issue visas. The visa does not confer any status; it only allows you to apply for the indicated status at the US border. Whether the status remains valid while you are in the US is determined by the I-94 form. Additionally, most nonimmigrants who are authorized to work in the US do not have a work permit, but ...


4

This could vary from embassy to embassy. The one in Switzerland says on its FAQ page (question 49): Since examination work were done with your application, you have to pay for the single-entry visa although you don't want it any more. And if you need double-entry, please apply for new double-entry visa with a set of new documents and follow the same ...


4

CBP is concerned that visitors to the United States do not intend to live in the US and are not likely to become dependent on public funds. Thus, when you enter, you should be able to show that you are departing the US (for Canada!) and that you have sufficient funds for your road trip. Be sure to tell the CBP officer that you are driving to Canada and that ...


4

Your question is incredibly confusing and asks several things at once. So let me make some statements that will probably clear up things for you. If you come to the UK as a tourist you are not allowed to work. It is illegal. Also nobody will give you a job, at least not as any kind of engineer. You need to apply for a work permit. It doesn't matter if you ...


4

As an Indian citizen, you require a visa to visit the United States. Indian citizens are not eligible for the Visa Waiver Program (which requires ESTA). A business visa (B-1) allows you to come to the US temporarily (usually up to six months, often much less) for certain permitted business purposes, such as attending meetings or training. It does not allow ...


4

Unfortunately, I think that this scenario falls through the cracks of what is allowed by any kind of temporary leave to enter the UK. Here are the possible routes, and an explanation as to why your contractor won't qualify. Business – general activities 5 A visitor may: (a) attend meetings, conferences, seminars, interviews; (b) give a one-...


4

You seem to have misunderstood. The refusal says I have refused your visa application... because I am not satisfied that you meet all of the requirements of paragraphs 245ZO, 3207D and 320 8A of the Immigration Rules. That doesn't say that you failed all three tests. It just says that you didn't pass them all (you passed two out of three), so you ...


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