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7

It still will be summer in Switzerland in August, so temperatures in most places (especially cities) are between 15 and 30 °C (60 - 90 °F). In the mountains it's fresher (not that this is a surprise), expect something between 0 and 15 °C (32 - 60 °F; that's air temperature, it will feel colder or warmer depending on wind and/or sunshine). Details of course ...


1

The simplest way, aside from forecasts, is to look at historical climate models that will indicate the historically most likely results. For Ella - from weather and climate.com: It looks like May gets average sun, is part of the rainy season, and the temperature is starting to drop. Precipitation is over 150mm, usually, for the month, over 16-17 rainy ...


5

There are lots of ‘best time to visit Venice’ guides out there online. Eg https://www.tripsavvy.com/best-time-to-visit-venice-1548173 You can expect fewer tourists, some decent if cooler weather, and some events to look out for (or avoid, depending on your preference). Acqua alta is most likely to happen in November - December http://en.turismovenezia.it/...


3

There is helpful information about this on, of all places, the railway website. https://www.italiarail.com/flood-warnings-venice Basically the issue is that as they say It happens when an unusually high tide pushes water from the Adriatic Sea into the Lagoon helped by southern winds and low atmospheric pressure. The flooding isn’t dangerous and it’s not ...


3

The west coast of Ireland will suit your requirements as long as you select a town or village that has what you need. There can be a heat wave but even then the temperatures are relatively low, 20's mostly. The father north, the fewer tourist and a bit inland you will find even less tourist while the weather is still cool. As Ireland and Germany are both ...


4

I finally found something close to what I was looking for: holiday-weather.com. This link is centered on Argentina, but you can move the map around; more importantly, you can select "Weather Average" to get just that on the map.


2

Building on @BKlassen's answer, you can purchase cooling towels that will make a difference, but only if the humidity isn't so high that evaporative cooling can occur. When we travel to SE Asia, we bring them with us. You soak the towel in water and drape it over your neck so it touches the skin by your carotid arteries. While not super effective in ...


1

According to this question on history SE about how ancient desert civilizations stayed cool allowing water to evaporate can help a lot with cooling. Answers to this question mention wrapping oneself in a damp blanket that will draw the heat from you as the dampness evaporates. Answers also mention filling water pots around the room which may be applicable ...


4

I've realized that this seems only common practice in Southern Europe (Portuguese here), due to the other answers, but the first thing I've learned to do during the summer while growing up is to always have the shutters down and the window(s) open. Especially if where you're staying is directly facing the sun, because this avoids the heat coming in but ...


1

To answer the question about what to do in a room that's too cold, a hot water bottle can help a lot. Even if you haven't planned in advance and brought one with you, they are relatively inexpensive. If your room has hot drink making facilities you can use those to fill it with properly hot water, but if not then even just the hot water from the tap will ...


2

The only solution that actually works is getting some sort of AC, or other active cooling to lower-than-ambient temperature, of your own. Evaporative cooling is useless in most climates; it just adds humidity that makes the heat more unbearable. Compressor-based AC is going to be bulky and hard to travel with. Some less conventional options that remain are: ...


3

You can acquire a small portable fan for not very much money at all (£10 for a reasonable one) and they are surprisingly powerful. Get one that can be plugged in and you can bring it with you and leave it running at night to give yourself some airflow.


0

If having extra items with you is not a problem (e.g. you travel with the car), you could bring your own small fan or a portable A/C unit with you. There are A/C units which cool air by evaporating water from a reservoir: those won't cool an entire house, but perform better than a simple fan, and can be quite small (some are USB-powered). Compressor-based ...


3

A hot shower will cool you off more than a cold shower. Hot water will increase blood flow to the skin, which will make your evaporative cooling work better. Reference https://theconversation.com/health-check-do-cold-showers-cool-you-down-71004 The verdict Our bodies respond more to changes in skin temperature than core temperature. So, if we cool part ...


13

It seems contradictory, but keeping the windows (and shades/shutters) closed during the day really help prevent too much heat accumulation. It works best if you can close them while the morning is still cool. Then as soon as the evening is cooler than your room, opening the windows allows the heat to escape more optimally. When I moved to the South of ...


8

If the bed has duvet, then take the duvet out of its cover. Then use the duvet cover as a light blanket/sheet. This will provide minimal insulation, and make the bed feel cooler.


3

The other answers offer some tips with dealing with the heat, but they'll only take you that far. Cold rooms are easy to deal with by using your jacket or asking for an extra quilt. But a hot room is simply intolerable for most. So although in the OP you ask what to do if there is no air-conditioning, the real answer is to never get into that situation ...


7

You can acclimatise to heat. After all, humans evolved in a warm climate. According to the University of Connecticut, it takes one or two weeks: Heat acclimation is a broad term that can be loosely defined as a complex series of changes or adaptations that occur in response to heat stress in a controlled environment over the course of 7 to 14 days. ...


30

Air conditioning is unfortunately not universal in Germany. There is only little you can do: Keep the window shades closed during the day (when you are likely to be absent) if they are on the outside or relatively bright. Ask at the reception if they have a fan that you can borrow. You already found that you can take a cold shower. Opening the window only ...


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