Hot answers tagged

93

If you travel a lot, it's a good idea to get in the habit of always, always checking both directions before stepping out, wherever you are, without habitually favouring either direction first: If it's a habit, you won't step out in front of a car if you get it wrong and forget you're in an other-side-of-the-road country momentarily (e.g. after a few drinks) ...


87

Since the issue is not only with food that you can spill but also with drinking from bottles or cans (even if you buy it from a vending machine, you are not supposed to drink it while you walk), which are not as easy to spill as walking around with a ramen bowl, this is not a hygiene issue. The topic is much more about the respect for food at large. When ...


62

You need to watch the pedestrian crossing light: You should only cross when it indicates "walk", which in this case will be indicated by an image of a walking person. Very old systems might use the words "DON'T WALK" and "WALK" instead of the hand and walker icons. Depending on the design of the intersection you might have to ...


56

From EU traffic rules for pedestrians: If, at the side of the carriageway, there are pavements (sidewalks) or suitable verges for pedestrians, pedestrians shall use them. It is recommended that domestic legislation should provide as follows: pedestrians walking on the carriageway shall keep to the side opposite to that appropriate to the ...


54

I have personal experience of walking around the mountains of Thiruvannamalai on a full moon day along with other devotees. Most of the devotees walk barefoot and so did I. The asphalt road is used not only by the devotees but also by other local peoples for transportation. So you will see many people wearing footwear on the asphalt road, who are not part of ...


49

There are three similar cases. There are traffic lights where the pedestrians usually have a red light and only get a green light if they request it by pushing a button. This seems to be the case in your question. A pedestrian is required to push the button and wait. (A slight variant has induction loops to detect bicycles, but pedestrians are still ...


48

All other answers are correct, but I think there is one exception: In a sharp corner with limited visibility, walk in the outer corner, regardless of traffic direction Source: Flickr, by Wally Gobetz, Creative Commons by-nc-nd. See page for more information. When you're walking here, it's safer to go in the outer corner, than in the inner corner, even if ...


46

Surprisingly, it appears that the answer is YES, Google Maps does make a distinction between uphill and downhill. I routed out a couple of bicycle rides from my home (in Germany) to a city either 90 km away (with a 700 m climb) or 60 km away (with a 1000 m climb), depending on the route taken. I then reversed both routes. In both cases, Google Maps shows ...


41

USA traffic systems are build for cars, other modes of transport are an afterthought if you are lucky, completely ignored if you are unlucky. If there are pedestrian crossing lights, use those. If using those involves you crossing more lanes of traffic, going from where you are might be an option. The best way to cross the street from where you stand is to ...


40

In rural North America, roads without sidewalks (aka pavements) are common. In fact, so are unpaved (gravel) roads, and in winter roads narrowed by snowbanks. School children in Canada are taught to walk facing traffic: From colouring pages by Elmer. There simply is no debate. Not being able to see a car that has already passed you is irrelevant. Walk ...


40

It's definitely not the same thing. There are two 'routes'. One is along the pedestrian walkway on the bridge. Same height as the traffic and trains. (source: Wikipedia) The other is over the 'arch' of the bridge, which is the one you pay $185 for. You get safety lines, can't take anything up with you (including cameras, I gather) and you have a guide. ...


35

In Australia, people are encouraged to keep to the left in busy pedestrian areas. For example, here is a sign posted in a railway station in Sydney: In addition, doors, walkways and other structures are placed assuming pedestrians keep to the left. For example, you may notice that in Australia ticket gates, one-way doors and escalators are placed so that ...


33

No. Google Maps works a different way. Google Maps learns travel times by monitoring the pace of other riders. The Google Maps app "constantly" sends data about your location back to the Google servers. It knows you're on a bike, not driving, because you requested a bike route, and because your travel time is not an outlier from other people doing the ...


32

Walking directions for Google maps says yes, it's possible: https://goo.gl/maps/MVoPY 57 min, 4.6 km from Airport station to the center of Tung Chung. Now I haven't tried this myself, and walking directions remain officially in beta... but a random Street View sampling indicates that the suggested route does have pedestrian walkways of some kind, including ...


30

I am living in Berlin Moabit which is very close to Tegel Airport. Since Tegel and Moabit are not that interesting at the first sight (which is what you catch when running I think), you should take the TXL-Bus (public transport / 2.8€) running every 10 min. from the airport to the inner city. Then you should jump off at U-Bhf Turmstraße (subwaystation) and ...


29

It's all about education. Kids are taught the following table manners from the age of around 2: You eat at the table When you are done, say "Gochisousamadesu" When you say you're done, you're done This is reinforced at kindergarten/elementary school lunches (no snacks, school-supplied lunch that's the same for every student). Those manners stick. And ...


29

From the UK Highway Code: Rules for pedestrians 1 Pavements (including any path along the side of a road) should be used if provided. Where possible, avoid being next to the kerb with your back to the traffic. If you have to step into the road, look both ways first. Always show due care and consideration for others. 2 If there is ...


29

Now that you've clarified in the comments, yes, it's entirely 'possible', but not easy, by any means. As mentioned by @Relaxed, only 37 people have been recorded successfully completing this challenge. As an American, you'd be the 5th American citizen to complete it, if you did it now. Some (crazy) people have even run across Australia. One of the ...


29

Walking barefoot probably won't be as bad as you expect. For one thing, that trail is walked barefoot by a lot of people, all the time. A lot of the things that make barefoot walking painful are likely to be accounted for - the will brush the path for small stones or sharp bits that would hurt to step on. For walking on the road, it might be wisest to ...


26

Just couple of months ago, during peak summer season, I completed this 14 odd km walk around the mountain and I did not do it barefoot. I was probably one of the few wearing my slippers among thousands of devotees but there was no glances of disapproval. Everyone does their own thing. I could not have completed the walk if I was barefoot because it was ...


25

I think more of it has to do with appearance than any sort of profundity everyone seems so fond of blaming. Japan is a HIGHLY image-conscious society, for better or worse, and stuffing your face while on the move isn't a good look, anywhere. In regard to Japan having this religious respect for food, I don't think anyone who's been to a proper nomikai at ...


24

This actually serves a practical purpose, and relates to something else: walking on a road that does not have an adjacent pavement/footpath, you are instructed to face incoming traffic. That is to say, in countries where you drive on the left of the road, you walk on the right of the road. This means that you can see the vehicles that you (might) need to ...


24

This is more an extended comment than an answer. The answer right now is simple: you cannot do that and there is no a reasonable date estimation on when you will be able to do the Santiago Trail again. It's impossible to give you a response for the near future, but it is possible to give you an answer for right now: you can't do the trek. This starts with ...


21

Being an Indian & Hindu, I can say that it is not mandatory for anyone to walk barefoot for such a long distance. However, due to some religious principles you will be requested to remove shoes while entering into temple. If you are entering into a temple which is quite big then you might have to walk for around 5-10 min barefoot(inside temple only). ...


21

Horizons Unlimited 21 Mar 2015 duibhceK: In Belgium 25km/h mopeds are obliged to use the cycle path everywhere, unless specific signs forbid it. 45km/h limited mopeds are obliged to use the cycle path wherever a speed limit higher than 50km/h is in effect. Within zones that have a 50km/h or lower speed limit you can choose whether you use the cycle path or ...


20

In the US, crosswalks are regulated in state laws and most states have some sort of regulation that motorized vehicles must yield for pedestrians being within a crosswalk. This is of course quite odd, since in most situations, the pedestrian must move into the road and potentially put himself in danger, to get the right of way on his side. Michigan is one ...


20

NJ 20 is a vital connector between Interstate 80 and NJ 4. It is a divided highway with a "Jersey barrier" down the middle the whole way, except for that intersection. The Jersey barrier is effectively uncrossable on foot. There is a jughandle intersection between 17th and 18th. OP is not trying to cross mid-block. 6 lanes on a paltry 80' right-...


18

I (and the whole country) was raised to do look left, right and again to the left before stepping off the curb. Obviously less efficient to do it in an opposite direction country but if you get used to a three step look around you will be fine in most places.


18

Are there for sources in Prague that have hand-held, printed maps? Maps are easy to obtain in Prague, no matter how you come to the country. Airport: A free map is available at the airport's public transport information kiosks. Train station: The main train station likewise gives out free maps at the public transport information counters. City center: ...


18

Other people have done nearly all the work here, but someone should draw everything together in an answer so the question can be put to bed. Your assumption that jaywalking must be a crime in England, Scotland and/or Wales is wrong. Growing up as a child in England, I heard about the existence of jaywalking. But because simply crossing against the lights ...


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