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23

No. Going to Mexico, Canada, and "adjacent islands" will not reset your 90 days (you can consult a list of adjacent islands). You can apply for a new 90 day period of admission by visiting a farther destination (say, Costa Rica) and returning to the US. However, such a move invites suspicion, and it's possible that you would be denied entry. The Visa Waiver ...


11

You can get an extension, but not a full 90 day one. The whole point of the 90 day visa limit is that is the maximum reasonable time (according to them) for a tourist to see what they want, and prevents illegal workers from staying in the country. The US does the same thing, and so do many other countries. Now, yes, you can exit and come back in, much ...


11

Unfortunately, the F1 expires after a year for Russian nationals, so it seems that I must fly back to Russia annually to apply for a visa every year. I was wondering if I could somehow avoid the flight back to Russia. A U.S. visa is only for entering the United States. You would only need to get a new visa if you need to leave and enter the United ...


9

In the past, it was fairly common to do "border runs" - when your 90 days were up as a backpacker, you'd exit the country for a few hours, and come right back in. I met many people doing this in most South American countries. In the past, the common way would be to do a border run. Head over from Foz Iguazu to Iguazu, spend the day checking out the falls, ...


8

As a US passport holder, you're "visa-exempt" and will generally be granted 90 days on arrival, no questions asked: The nationals of the following countries are eligible for the visa exemption program, which permits a duration of stay up to 90 days: ... U.S.A. ... Now, making a quick visit to another country for the sole purpose of renewing your visa ...


8

I have no idea what "doing [your] dental" means, but regardless - No, you can not do this. Each time you enter the US your entry is at the discretion of the immigration staff. Even with a visa, they can choose to allow you in for the normal time period for your visa (generally 180 days for a B1/B2 visa), refuse your entry, or allow you in but for a limit ...


7

What you're asking about is called a visa run. Staying on back-to-back tourist visas is frowned on by many countries, and Immigration will probably start wondering if you're working illegally sooner or later, but anecdotal evidence says South Korea is not particularly picky and it's possible to stay for years this way. Your mileage may vary. However, it ...


7

A tourist in Brazil can stay for a maximum of 90 consecutive days, extendable to 180 days every one year by issuing a request at the Federal Police Department (DPF). That's not automatic; you must go to the nearest Federal Police office and fill a form and pay a fee (currently R$ 67.00 or US$ 30.70). Be prepared to present them the usual information you need ...


7

Let's get the easy question out of the way first. Yes, you will need to buy your ticket to South America before you depart for the US. One of the conditions of entering under the VWP is that you have either a return or onward ticket out of the US within 90 days of entry. This will normally be enforced by the airline, and if you do not have such a ticket ...


7

US citizens don't need a visa to Israel, and get admitted for up to 3 months (90 days) at a time. Once you left Israel - you can be readmitted for additional 90 days, but leaving through land crossings for several days in Jordan/Egypt might not count as "leaving" (similarly, by the way, as the US treats foreign tourists leaving to Canada/Mexico and then ...


7

Based on the Israel's MFA website A B/2 visa is valid for up to three months from the date of issue. The duration of the stay in Israel will be determined by the Border Police. A visitor who wishes to extend his visit may submit an application at one of the regional population administration offices of the Ministry of the Interior. So just follow the ...


7

Given that you apparently wish to stay in Malaysia for 180+ days I have serious doubts that you are a genuine tourist / business traveler and any immigration official is able to make similar conclusions. They will then go on to ask whether you are living in Malaysia illegally and whether you are working there off-the-books. I have found two recent articles ...


6

I would double-check this with Border Services before getting on a plane, but my understanding is they only want proof you are leaving. For example, at http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/information/applications/guides/5256ETOC.asp it says you must (among other things): satisfy an officer that you will leave Canada at the end of your stay, show that you have ...


6

I think that your problem here would be that you can't provide proof of income (to show you'd be able to support yourself for a year) without tipping them off that you would be working there but not paying income tax (since your company is not located in Laos and therefore your income taxes would go back to France rather than stay in Laos). Therefore, it ...


6

In the Canadian law your authorized period of stay in Canada begins on the date you enter the country and ends at the earlier of the date you were permitted to stay until or the date you leave Canada. A new entry into Canada requires you to be authorized for a new period of stay; there are no exceptions based on the country you travel to when you leave. Note ...


6

It is definitely risky. I know a few people who did that successfully a couple of years ago and I know a person who was detained in a cell for a night and then got deported. Usually it's pretty obvious to the immigration that you are doing a visa run, and most likely they will question you about it. For it to be successful the officer has to be convinced ...


6

Trying to avoid your visa run by just passing immigration is inviting trouble you don't want to have. Work your plans out ahead of time and enjoy a day of vacation in somewhere nice! From your question I read that you are living permanently in China, i.e. that you have a long-term rent contract there and probably also some type of work (promotion, teaching ...


5

Unlike the US, Schengen doesn't have the notion of your "90-day period," and there's never anything to "reset" at some threshold. The Schengen rules are that you may not be in the Schengen area for more than 90 days in any 180-day period without a long-stay visa. It doesn't matter how long your stays are or where you go in between; what matters is the total ...


5

I lived in Taiwan for two years holding a New Zealand passport (which also has a visa-exempt period), doing visa runs to the Philippines every month or so. The fact is, as long as you leave on time (ie do not overstay), you can re-enter visa free as many times as you like. Absolutely nobody frowned on me, and immigration officers just flicked through the ...


5

You might be better off specifically going to Penang (Malaysia), so you can visit the Thai Embassy there and purchase a 90-day visa (as opposed to the traditional 30-day visa). It's quite easy to do the visa run from Phuket, and I would assume the same goes for Krabi as from memory it is quite close to Phuket. When you're in Krabi or Phuket, go to a travel ...


5

Following jcaron and other people online who have the same issue as you, technically you can leave South Korea and come back to reset your visa-free travel. There is no written rule on how many times you can renew tourist visa by entering and exiting the country, as the government has the right to kick out or detain any one. It probably will look suspicious ...


5

Yes it did. Unlike many countries, Taiwan doesn't Limit your stay to 90 days per 180-day period, nor does it forbid visa runs. A number of expats live in Taiwan without a visa. (note: you don't have a Taiwan visa for 90 days; rather, you can stay in Taiwan without a visa for 90 days) Also, if you're a British or Canadian citizen, you can extend your stay ...


5

There is no formal limit on the frequency of visits or their cumulative length. However you are not allowed to make the US your primary residence. If you start spending more time in the USA than outside it then the border guards may start suspecting that you are planning to make (or already have made) the USA your primary residence. And the burden of ...


5

Note that the situation in Cuba could change, given recent opening up to the US and with the recent passing of Castro, and as a result you should probably check with your government, or a Cuban embassy, but for now, these are the rules, as according to Wikivoyage: (source) A tourist visa card (visa de tarjeta del turista) is necessary for travelers from ...


5

I just called immigration at OR Tambo airport, and they said that normally you should only be given the remainder of your original 90-day visa-free visit unless having left Africa altogether - this is in order to prevent people from doing visa runs (living in the country without a visa). However, I've heard anecdotes about land border agents often being ...


4

Timatic is generally considered the definitive reference for Visas. It's what most travel agents use when booking tickets, and what most airlines use when verifying you have the correct visa before boarding. In general Timatic isn't free, however a number of websites do allow free access to it, such as Star Alliance and Gulf Air. You can use either of these ...


4

I've always found http://www.projectvisa.com/ to be a very helpful resource as it gives you a really quick way to check visa requirements and then you can verify it against one of the links (typically to the countries Foreign Affairs website). While travelling I've noticed that few people seem to know about this site because it pretty much never shows up on ...


4

In the UK you definitely need a return ticket booked before they will allow you on the plane, as my sister inlaw found out in Sep. She was refused entry at the boarding gate as she didn't have her return ticket, she had to go online via her phone and purchase a return ticket whilst standing at the gate, she ended up paying over the odds and only making her ...


4

Considering that the cheapest way across would probably be walking there are many crossings that you can do this at: Niagara Falls Rainbow Bridge In Vancouver you can do this across the Peace Arch You can 100% cross by foot into Lubek, ME, the only problem is I have no idea how to get to the Canadian side of the border through Canada as there didn't seem ...


4

"I am not trying to do a visa run" What you're trying to do is exactly a visa run, you're leaving and reentering the country with the sole intent of bypassing the limits on your visa. Why would US immigration believe that you left the country for another reason than to get out from under the 90 day restriction on your visa, or that you aren't planning to ...


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