New answers tagged

1

no. I wanted to work in a cafe for free accommodation, and was told that it was illegal and I was denied entry at the airport and deported. My experience suggests that legally it isn't.


4

There are a range of approaches to visas. At one extreme, a visa is just permission to travel to a port of entry, where an official will decide whether to admit the traveler. Any operating port of entry has to have people who are authorized to make those decisions, and who can also decide whether to admit visa-free travelers or grant a visa on entry. At ...


4

@hippietrail Possibly because a visa stamp in a passport is positive authority issued by their government, nothing more needed by the border guard than to check the date and match the photo to the face. With visa-free border crossings they still need to positively identify the person and to check against database records that the person is not a known ...


2

Key terms: Re-entry permit is used to enter on a previously obtained, valid permission to stay stamp. Obtained at the local immigration office and some of the international airports (land borders usually do not issue them). Cost is 1000 baht for single re-entry and 3800 for multiple re-entry permit. The permit is tied to the permission to stay in which you ...


0

"Leave" is a noun (and says what that stamp is) The word "leave" exists as a noun, or a thing. Other examples of things are "visa", "waiver", "membership", "citizenship" or "permission". Consider the soldier was AWOL (Away Without Official Leave) Meaning the soldier did not have the necessary permission to wander outside the post. The "leave" is the ...


15

I think all the previous answers have missed the point. I think the confusion comes from the conflicting information in the two entry stamps. The earlier stamp said you have permission to stay for up to 6 months (ie. from 31 Oct 2019 until 30 Apr 2020). Unfortunately, because you left the country on 27 Dec 2019 (for your brief trip to Amsterdam), your ...


3

According to this the annotation in the passport means exactly what it means: your leave to enter (govspeak for permission to cross UK border and stay for specified period) expired on 31.01.2020, contrary to what other answers do imply. IO has freedom to determine the period for which you're allowed to enter - AND STAY in - the UK to anything between 3 and ...


5

Unfortunately, "leave" has more than one meaning in English. It can mean "go away", or it can mean "get permission". No, you were not "required to leave". "Required to leave" means you were told to go away. You were not. Even on Jan 31st. even though by law you had to leave, you left voluntarily. If the police came to your hotel room on Feb. 1st and said "...


8

Jessica, from the stamps in your passport the word "leave" here means permission. That means permission to enter into the UK up to the date stamped/written on your passport, ie Jan 2020. Also, just because HK has a 6-month visa entry to the UK doesn't mean you can be in the UK for the 6 months period. That is just the maximum time allowed for an HK ...


66

A quick answer to clarify the crux of the matter. For non-native English speakers, be aware that: Very confusingly, the word "leave" has a number of completely different meanings. One meaning is simply "permission". The stamps shown very simply mean: "Permission to enter until ..." This meaning of the word "leave" is utterly different from the ...


76

This question is asking if you were deported, removed or "required to leave" the UK because of illegal entry or overstay. If it applied to you, the Home Office would have served you with paperwork (e.g. an IS151 form) stating that you were being removed, deported or required to leave (which ever the case may have been). You were actually admitted to the UK, ...


4

You have a lot of answers related to your current plan of staying up to six months. This answer questions that whole plan. Your goal is to work out where your current long distance relationship is going, and if it goes well to be able to marry your boyfriend and move to the UK. For that to be feasible, you need to keep a good record with the UK immigration ...


5

All the answers above are good, but I have a bit of additional advice. I'm British, and my wife is American and works for a US airline, so we frequently have family coming to the UK using her cheap travel benefits, who usually stay for a while, so I have some experience on what to expect. If you don't have a return ticket, your first problem will not be ...


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