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131

No, standing is not illegal in Venice. I think the quote got lost in translation. The Italian version says: È proibito comunque sostare per consumare cibi o bevande ad esclusione delle aree in concessione ai Pubblici Esercizi.   As a native Italian speaker, I would translate this as: It is forbidden to stop to eat or drink except in areas ...


100

I was in Venice in summer 2013. It didn't smell bad, even though it was hot. We asked some locals (who we were staying with) about the legendary smell. Historically, raw sewage was simply dumped into the canals and (eventually) washed out to sea. This had been the status quo for centuries, with some improvement over the years but there was still lots of old ...


61

You may, but you do need to know in which canals the craft is allowed. A Danish ex-pat, Rene Seindal, who operates Venice Kayak, as well as blogging, has a great post describing where kayaks are banned, and includes maps to guide you through the canals on which it is allowed. In case the link goes down, here is one of the several maps by Rene Seindal from ...


40

First of all, looking at the reviews for Osteria da Nico on Tripadvisor, regrettably you fell prey to a tourist trap. Regarding your question on pricing by weight: such is typical for foods such as meat (e.g. a steak) or especially seasonal fish but very untypical for regular courses (such as e.g. a Pizza). You can find the menu of a reputable Italian ...


34

I have heard this "fact" many times. Another version states that this is especially true in the summer. I was on a trip to Italy only last month and visited Venice as part of it. I spent three days there, took vaporettos (ferries) and walked most of the time. The water ways and canals do host a wide variety of algae and water-weeds and it is indeed true ...


21

As noted in other answers and comments, this is probably a mistranslation — it appears they mean "no loitering about, even if you're eating". My guess is that this is comes from the common "No Standing" traffic regulation, or otherwise from Merriam-Webster's sense #9a of "to stand": 3a: to remain stationary or inactive ... not from the "upright on two ...


17

If you're going to do this, you should probably just rent a boat there. That way you don't really have to worry about local regulations because the company that you rent from will take care of everything, not to mention that you won't have to lug around an actual boat through Italy. Also, just a word of caution. I could see myself paddling around Venice in ...


16

The two main public transportation are ACTV and Alilaguna. You have quite a few options Murano: from Piazzale Roma or from Venezia Santa Lucia train station, take the ACTV line 3. The trip takes 20 mins. You could also take line 4.2 but it takes almost 40 mins. From the airport you can reach Murano in 30 mins using the Alilaguna public transportation. If ...


16

The website you mentioned provides a reasonable outline of what is forbidden, however the official references are mentioned at the bottom: (see articles 23 and 49 septies of Urban Police regulations) The regulations are obviously in Italian, so I will translate them for you. Article 23 Original: Altri atti vietati In tutto il territorio del ...


13

Yes. I went there in September and there was a consistent whiff of stagnant water more or less everywhere. It wasn't exactly oppressive, but I didn't get used to it either and I noticed it regularly. I was however only there for two stints of two days each which I accept isn't a large amount of acclimatisation.


11

I was in Venice last year on 27th Nov. Based on my experience on that day : You definitely need to wear jacket. It was around 6-8 Celcius. I put some of my photos below. As you can see, all the people wear jackets. On that day, it was sunny. I love photography as you do, and my photos in Venice were my best photos during my trip in Europe. However there'...


11

One option is to take the train. I've just looked for a random weekday in September, and there's basically one train an hour in each direction. It's direct, and takes just shy of 4 hours. To get train times, your best bet is to use Bahn.de and search from there. (Yes, that is the German railways rather than the Italian I'm suggesting, but they have a better ...


11

Venice is an expensive and beautiful place to visit. While you can take a land bus from the airport to the train station end of Venice, I think that would be a false economy for your first visit. The alilaguna is 12 euros each way. Venice is a water city and approaching and leaving it by water, as though the train/bus bridge was never built, will put you in ...


10

What I can tell you about northern Italy (anywhere between Milano and Venice) is that the cities basically closes down in August (except for tourist destinations such as museums and churches), and even more so in the afternoon. If you will be walking the streets of any town in that area (Modena, Padua, Ravenna, Verona, etc), it will be like in a Zombie movie ...


10

According to Venice airport and public transportation sites, you can take bus linea 5. Fare is 1.30€. I don't know if some constraints apply on luggage. Linea 5 leaves you at piazzale Roma near Santa Lucia train station. From there, take Vaporetto nr. 1 to piazza San Marco.


10

I agree with you about the fact that Venice is the place which should not be skipped if one happens to be in the area. I also know that Venice may be expensive compared to other places. Having said this, I'd surely go for a Venitian accommodation rather than one at Lido. Venice is a town which should be enjoyed on foot. People do take vaporetti or motoscafi ...


10

I have never been to the USA, so I can't really compare the airport in Venice to any American airport. The airport in Venice is rather small and organized in a standard way (for Europe and Asia at least). After you arrive, you get to the passport control desk, then you need to find your luggage on the correct conveyor belt. If you have nothing to declare (...


10

I would like to put forth my experience. We forgot to take our camera when alighting at Florence; the train was bound to Naples. We had very little time left before boarding the next train to Pisa and from Pisa, the flight back to London. We ran to the Trenitalia counter at Florence, and clearly told them the details of the location and attributes of the ...


9

Hot Chocolate and the Italian Summer As many, many waiters must have told you, hot chocolate is not exactly a summer drink. I do understand that those same establishments probably serve hot coffee and tea in the summer, however tea is somewhat of a more multi-season drink whereas coffee is a daily drink for most Italians. In my opinion, if you wish to ...


9

Since your parking venue in Fusina is Parcheggio custodito 24h, you probably have a simple solution, at least to solve the Blue Badge problem. Make a photocopy of your Blue Badge, and take the original and the photocopy to the car park attendant. Since the car park is staffed 24 hours per day, you can ask them to check your original and then annotate the ...


8

Every Saturday there are two scheduled buses running from the Mestre station, via the Marco Polo and Treviso airports to Arabba. Tickets can be booked on dolomiti.org.


8

The ACTV public bus No. 5 (orange bus) from Marco Polo airport to Piazzale Roma and takes about 25 minutes and costs 5 EUR. The ATVO bus (blue color) costs the same and takes about 5 minutes less. I would then just take a 6.50 EUR vaporetto ride (no.1) to San Marco. It's cheaper and takes about the same time. The cheaper 1.30 EUR fare is only for residents ...


8

Culture is in Venice city itself, whereas nightlife can be found on isola di Lido or on terra ferma at Mestre. Hotel accomodation is less expensive in these two places but it is less romantic as well. Booking an hotel in Venice may be the right choice, considering that Mestre is reachable by train and Lido by vaporetto (last train from Mestre at 23h46, next ...


8

Every city smells, and every city smells differently from any other city. If you're there long enough you no longer notice, to a new arrival it's quite distinct. Venice, being a city with a lot of salt water in a warm climate, no doubt smells rather distinctly compared to many landlocked cities. And that's all there is to it.


8

Your case should be covered by EU passenger rights (Regulation (EC) 1371/2007). According to the regulation you should be able to get a refund of 50% of the original ticket price. Additionally they should refund the ticket for the new train (but you should have asked Deutsche Bahn employees in Munich on that day whether they would unlock your original ...


8

Venice canal water is nasty. Remember this city does not have a sewage treatment plant. The wonders of the city are best explored on foot anyway, and the vaporetto network is extensive and cheap. I would not think it worth the bother.


7

Venice is an expensive and small place. You can pay thousands of euros a night to stay steps (and they mean steps) from San Marco. But even if you're within sight of the train station, you're no more than an hour from San Marco on foot, quicker with the vaporetti. When you're searching the various travel sites, any hotel that is actually in Venice itself as ...


7

My first hand experience with France is that on 1st of August it's absolutely impossible to get through, because of absolutely infernal traffic on all the highways. Seems like everyone is going to the beach at same time. I haven't visited cities at that time, so can't say how bad is it. I do have first hand experience living in Madrid, which does indeed ...


7

I don't speak Italian, but we have a similar rule here in a very popular mall that people cannot stand around talking / eating if that area is not part of a restaurant. This rule is to prevent a concentration of people impeding traffic or other movement by simply standing around; especially in busy areas. Strictly to prevent traffic jams as the place is ...


6

According to the map of water bus lines (pdf), you can move to all the islands you mentionned, and more (I loved the quietness of San Michele). The web site of Venice public transportation is ACTV.it.


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