69

It'd be fairly unlikely that they don't quote the price to you. Here's your ticket (whispers to themselves, that's $10,000). If no monetary value was quoted to you, it was free. If not, you've got a fight on your hands and a potential PR problem for the airline. You could always call the airline before HR and ask them what class of ticket you received, ...


55

There are many different "fare classes" of economy fare. Some cost more, and all you are paying for is "this is a class you might be able to upgrade from." The cost of the ticket plus the cost of the upgrade is less than the cost of a business class ticket, but you can't always upgrade because there may not be space available in business. There's a luck ...


37

If you didn't sign for any payment, it was a free upgrade, period. Anything else would be impossible to prove for them - how could they ever prove that you agreed to pay X for it, or that you even asked for an upgrade? If this were possible, they could just charge anybody they feel like an upgrade fee. Also, they wouldn't have access to your credit card to ...


28

Congratulations, I wouldn't complain! Airlines are pretty good these days at managing their passenger load, but sometimes they might overbook a flight or make some mistake and move people around between classes. Worst case, they made a mistake (and notice) and you'll fly economy just like you booked. Best case, you'll enjoy bigger seats and fancier food.


28

The #1 rule of upgrades is to not believe most of what is said and written about them. There may have been a time (decades ago) when upgrades were at the discretion of the gate or flight crew, and being pleasant and well-dressed might work. These days, some airlines don't even have a premium cabin, and those that do have strict rules about upgrades. There ...


23

If it is a private (or “hidden”) fare then the price your travel agent pays for your seat is a commercially private matter between your agent and his liaison at the airline. (It is probably not the fare that you paid him.) It is, to put it succinctly, a secret. In order to compute the cost of your upgrade, the airline employee needs to know what the ...


20

The issue is that in order to give you a specific seat, they need it to be free. If the better seats are already given away, normally the people who have received a seat have this printed on their (e-) tickets. Moving someone away from their seat because you want it is very tricky. So the best strategy would be to get a better seat in the first place ...


20

It is perfectly possible that there is no Business/First class cabin on the plane - you don't say how long the flight is. For example, British Airways flights within the UK are sometimes booked as "C" class tickets (Business), even though there is no business class - it simply means you have an expensive, flexible ticket with benefits (e.g. lounge entry). ...


18

The answer appears to be yes as long as you do so before boarding the train (otherwise you'll be travelling with an invalid ticket). The National Rail website about Off-Peak and Super Off-Peak ticket terms and conditions says: Changing the time or date of travel If you wish to change your time of travel or class of the ticket, you can pay the ...


17

I’ve flown a million miles in 10 years across 13 airlines. I’ve been upgraded hundreds of times at the gate and it’s free. You walk up, ask to be put on the upgrade list, they put you on it, and that’s the end of it. By the way, be VERY nice to the desk attendant. You can then get upgraded 1 of 2 ways. First, it can happen preboard. Just watch the screen, ...


15

It's rather common for unpublished fares to subject to special rules including a "no upgrades" policy. These are discount fares offered through travel agents and consolidators, generally for the leisure market. They offer a way to airlines to sell cheaper space to price-sensitive travelers without having to cut prices for those who may be willing to pay more....


12

In addition to the scenario identified by Andrew Ferrier, where the cabin displayed is an artifact of the fare class and not the actual existence of those seats on the aircraft, there are several other scenarios where an economy fare can yield a premium seat, though admittedly I do not think any would apply to Avianca. -UP Fares In the domestic U.S., various ...


11

Getting hotel upgrades is indeed like getting flight upgrades -- the odds are low, and stay low even if you try to game the system, but occasionally you win. I'm also assuming that you have no elite status with the hotel/chain, since that's a whole different ballgame, although it is also by far the best way to get upgrades. First of all, it's important to ...


11

Bidding for upgrades is fairly common these days and many airlines do it, primarily in Europe. Typically there is a minimum bid that's fairly substantial. Whether this is worth trying or not depends on your own preference. I won a $400 bid on a Tap Portugal flight from Boston to Lisbon. It's an overnight flight - Tap Portugal flies a really nice lie-flat ...


10

United allows cabin crew to sell "upgrades" to Economy Plus (not technically an upgrade, since Economy Plus is still the economy class, just with more legroom) from their handheld devices. Source: If passengers want to upgrade to economy plus during boarding, for example, Bingochea can easily accommodate the request using a proprietary app on his ...


9

Almost always, I find the best approach is "gradual improvement". Almost all the seating changes you need to make can be made most effectively through the airline's own website: Firstly, always check if you can pick your seat as soon as your ticket is booked. Most full-price airlines, typically if you have some frequent-flyer status or a higher-priced ...


8

I fly regularly with the same few airlines for business (even though I always purchase standard tickets) and have noticed that maybe one in every 8-10 flights, I am upgraded in some way, whether its 'first class' on a short haul flight (larger seats) or invited to the first class lounge on longer flights without much notice. They don't directly tell me this ...


8

The other day Lufthansa was selling Premium Economy upgrades after the door was closed. The price was ridiculous, though, and no one went for it.


7

According to the AA website on system-wide upgrades: Obtaining systemwide upgrades When you qualify or re-qualify for AAdvantage® Executive Platinum status: And that's it, as far as anything a typical frequent flyer can aim for in a given program year. Million Miler You get additional SWUs (previously known as eVIPs or VIPOWs) in the Million Miler ...


7

Contact Icelandair You can always contact Icelandair to have your ticket(s) upgraded to Saga Premium. Bid for an upgrade You can also bid for an upgrade to Saga Premium with Icelandair's Class Up. On the Class Up page you can check your eligibility for Class Up, but you should also receive an e-mail regarding Class Up if you're eligible. If you're more ...


7

The answer depends on the bid quantum and the delta in the paid fare vs available upgrade fare. Intra Europe the difference in full fare economy and full fare business is usually under 50 EUR. Whereas the bid-for-upgrade rate might be 100 EUR. Of course if you paid deep discount economy it could be a good deal. On the other hand repricing a deep discount ...


6

Upgrades are handed out for two broad reasons: either the hotel has to, or the hotel wants to. Like airlines, hotels overbook: a hotel with 100 rooms will accept (say) 110 bookings, and expect that 10 people don't show up. (For example, my employer's corporate booking rate at a large chain lets you cancel bookings for free until 6 PM on the day of arrival. ...


6

I had checked out of my hotel that morning and imposed on a friend for that evening until around 22:00. So probably arrived at the check-in counter around 22:30. I had nowhere else to go and would have been very happy to while away a few hours in one of the Emirate's lounges (comfortable seating, free food and drink, newspapers, wi-fi etc). My flight was not ...


6

According to https://www.railforums.co.uk/threads/railuk-fares-ticketing-guide-section-4-excesses-upgrades-supplements.70374/#post-1185795 yes you can, and there is no penalty for doing so on-board. Note that for a return ticket, the price charged for the excess is the full difference between the original return ticket and the return ticket you are ...


6

Edelweiss allows you to upgrade from Economy to Business after boarding the plane. At least for short-haul flights, subject to seat availability. Payment can be done through credit card or debit card. This even works, if catering does not allow for the +1 on the manifest, which it normally does. I don't know if it would work on long-haul flights, since I ...


6

Air France/KLM allows upgrades on board by speaking to a flight attendant: UPGRADE LAST MINUTE ON BOARD You can even upgrade your cabin after boarding, subject to availability. Eligible airlines: Air France and KLM marketed and operated flights Available payment methods: Miles or just cash How to request: on board


5

I once booked a compact (i.e. cheapest available) car at Avis in Germany via Internet, and included a satnav option. Because they didn't have (or didn't want to bother with) a portable satnav, I got a Ford S-Max with a builtin one.


5

While it's difficult to demonstrate a negative, after an exhaustive search through discussions at FlyerTalk and Milepoint, blog posts at The Cranky Flier and Boarding Area, and articles at other places which report on the vagaries of AAdvantage and its tools, I'm prepared to say that as of May 2015 the answer is still no, it is not possible for passengers to ...


5

I'm assuming this is a revenue (paid) ticket, not a mileage award. You say that you booked economy because business was sold out. Since you are willing to buy business class, your travel agency or Etihad should be able to wait-list you now for business class. That way, if someone cancels, your upgrade would automatically clear, your travel agency will be ...


5

BA (also One World) is consistently inconsistent about upgrading tickets booked through travel agents. Upgrading with Avios, 30% of the time, I get told I can't as it was 'booked through an agent and I have to contact them' (the agent is often uninterested in helping and/or can't do Avios upgrades). Upgrading with cash, this happens 70% of the time. I've ...


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