63

Greg Hewgill's answer is correct, but one caveat: do not talk to the immigration officer about doing any work in the US. A series of business meetings is fine, but the VWP does not allow you to work in the US for money. It is fine to bring your laptop to take notes on at the meeting or to show the immigration officer the work that you are doing (in Europe),...


59

As a UK citizen, you are eligible for Visa Waiver Program entry: The Visa Waiver Program (VWP) enables most citizens or nationals of participating countries* to travel to the United States for tourism or business for stays of 90 days or less without obtaining a visa. The permitted activities include: Business: consult with business associates ...


59

The only regular non-immigrant visa category that would conceivably allow working in a shop (no matter whether paid or not) would be H-2B for temporary non-agricultural workers. But that is a purely theoretical option, because it will only be issued if the U.S. Department of Labor finds that it is in the interest of the U.S. economy to let the particular ...


46

The Home Office was asked in 2015, what the legal basis for such questioning is. Here is their answer. Assuming that you are an EEA national, Border Force officers can ask you any questions that allow them to establish your identity and nationality. This may include questions about your travel history. The EEA Regulations 2006 specify that an EEA ...


44

I believe it is too late to apply for 2019, but the J-1 visa summer work travel program allows this sort of work situation if you are a currently-enrolled post-secondary student and your visit is during your academic summer break and within the program dates (which are Jun-1 to Sep-30 for 2019). Summer Work Travel Program College and University ...


43

What you have heard is completely untrue. Countries issue passports to their citizens abroad all the time, and those citizens use those passports to return to the country of issue. If what you have heard were true, it would be impossible for countries to issue passports at their consulates abroad, or to mail them to their citizens abroad. It wouldn't make ...


43

The ban is a matter of law based on the facts of your situation. You can look at the law and make your own determination about whether you are currently under a ban based on the facts of your situation. Various bans have various durations, specified in the law. You can't ask the US government whether you currently have a ban -- in many cases they don't even ...


40

Although it doesn't entirley answer your question, I am posting this as answer because I don't think you appreciate the risks involved here. Your proposition is to travel to a foreign country and risk imprisonment there, for the sake of a family holiday. Your hope for avoiding these consequences is that they will not recognise you based off the fact that ...


34

If you want to stay longer than 90 days, you can apply for a Visa. That might be the better alternative than hopping out and in, as it removes the cost - and the risk of not being allowed back in (as well of the need to lie about your plans when entering). Note that travelling to Canada or Mexico does not reset your day count; you need to go 'further' than ...


32

According to EU rules you need either a passport or a national ID card to travel between EU countries. However, the UK does not issue national ID cards- there was a whole political issue about possibly introducing them during the Blair government which led to them eventually being rejected. As a British citizen you absolutely 100% need a passport to leave ...


31

Strictly speaking, this is in the hands of the EU, which maintains two lists, Annex I (countries whose nationals requiring a visa for a short stay, labelled A in the link above) and Annex II (countries whose nationals do not require a visa, labelled B). As a member state, the UK is not on either list, and it falls between two stools in terms of automatically ...


28

Don't try to travel using a passport with an improper photo. This is a good way to find yourself spending a very long time in a detention room in an airport, possibly in a foreign country. Contact the Passport Adviceline on 0300 222 0000 as soon as possible to report the problem. The line is open Monday to Friday, 8am to 8pm and weekends and public holidays,...


28

I am worried they will (a) not let me board my flight from Edinburgh-Seville; There are no exit checks when leaving the UK. Airline staff will check your passport to see if you are allowed to enter Spain. They are extremely unlikely to check for an entry stamp. They will just want to see the ID page. (b) detain me or worse deport me (to the US) from ...


27

Yes, all this is fine. Some people have been denied entry to the US when coming to the US even temporarily to marry a US citizen, so you will see advice online (even sometimes from immigration lawyers) saying that you need a fiancee visa for this purpose. But the State Department's Foreign Affairs Manual says that a B-2 visa is appropriate for this purpose:...


26

Since you are a citizen of the European Union you do not need a visa to travel to any other EU country. UK is not part of the Schengen Area, so you only need a passport (or national identity card) to cross the border and that's it. From Wikipedia: Individuals from the following countries can enter the Schengen Area, Bulgaria,[3] Cyprus,[4] and Romania[5] ...


26

If you paid by credit card, dispute the invalid charge immediately with your credit card company/bank and let them handle it. You'll get the money back quickly, and it becomes their problem from then on. If you did not pay by credit card, things get more difficult. If you're still in Thailand, contact the Tourist Police, who should be able to help you ...


26

The passport office has an option to receive a callback. I left my name and number and an adviser called me back a couple of hours later. The adviser explained that the quickest it is possible to replace a lost or stolen passport is 7 days. The 1 day service is only available for replacements of expired or nearly expired passports that are still in your ...


25

It’s going to be a certificate of regret for quite some time. There is no such thing. Run! You obviously told them you don’t have any close friends or relatives in the UK so very shortly they are going to say ok in that case we can do you that favour. And You then kiss goodbye to your money Just for the sake of completeness you do not need to pay any third ...


24

Firstly keep in mind that the answer to this question will vary significantly depending on the countries involved. Some countries (eg, the US) have requirements that if you are a citizen you MUST enter using the passport of that country. So as a US/UK citizen you must always use your US passport when entering the US. The UK does NOT have such a ...


24

While I agree with all the advice that it's both foolish to risk incarceration in a foreign country for the sake a family vacation (in quite an over-rated spot, at that) and that showing up in court in response to a summons is not considered an optional activity, you can check fairly easily on whether or not you have any active warrants in Florida. The ...


23

As you are a British citizen who was born in the UK, you don't need a passport to travel to the Republic of Ireland, as long as you have another form of photographic ID (for example a photo driving licence). The same applies for Irish citizens travelling to the UK, but not for any other nationality. (Note that these are immigration requirements, and your ...


23

For staying longer than 90 days, you should get a visa. Trying to make multiple stays of around 90 days, with short gaps in between is almost certain to get you refused entry. People often assume that visa free entry to whatever country means that you have some kind of right to enter the country, as long as you're out within 90 days. It doesn't work like ...


22

Good news. As a British citizen, assuming you're visiting for under 90 days, you don't need a visa. You can apply through the Visa Waiver Program under the ESTA (Electronic System for Travel Authorization). From the US Embassy in London: British citizens: please note that from 12 January 2009 all nationals and citizens of Visa Waiver Program (VWP) ...


22

The general consensus on the internet seems to be that the sticker is an RFID chip used by Identity and Passport Service (IPS) to track the production process of the passport from start to shipping. There are many such questions disseminated across the web (here, here and here are a few examples). Most mention stories of people traveling with and without the ...


22

You can just buy a ticket home and leave the USA. No need for help with that. But you will not easily be able to get back into the USA. Almost everybody who overstayed can not use the 'no visa' option anymore and it will become much harder to get a normal visitors visa. Your embassy can also not help you there, you broke the rules, you suffer. As mentioned ...


22

You will certainly¹ not need a visa. The UK has declared it will not require visas for any EU nationals for short stays, and the EU has declared the same for the UK (see European Commission press release and Brexit preparedness document). However, from 2021 you will most likely need to apply for ETIAS (an electronic authorisation similar to US ESTA). ...


21

HMPO have now included a little note along with the passport that says "the label on the back of your passport was used during the production process and can now be removed".


21

This is actually very clearly covered by this document published by the Department of State, which is linked from the page on the Visa Waiver Program: Conference, meeting, trade show, or business event attendee: Will receive no salary or income from a U.S based company/entity. For scientific, educational, professional or business purposes. Lecturer or ...


21

Yes, you can enter Israel or Jordan after visiting the other without problems. The two signed a peace treaty in 1994 and have permitted travel to each other ever since. Of course, you may be questioned in Israel about what you were doing in Jordan, but if you went there for legitimate business reasons, you'll be fine.


21

As far as I can find on the net, neither South Africa nor the UK have any problems with dual nationality acquired at birth, so you don't need to be particularly hush-hush about it. Bring both sets of passports and present To border guards of one of the two countries: The passport of that country. To everyone else, including airline agents: The passport of ...


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