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36

RyanAir is to blame, as you followed the rules precisely for UK landside transit with an EU residence permit. Unfortunately, passenger recourse against such problems is difficult. You could try to claim EC261 compensation for denied boarding, and/or seek passenger rights help from Spanish authorities at seguridadaerea.gob.es. The rules are shown in Timatic, ...


24

It'll likely depend on the airline, but I accidentally did this a few years back with Qantas - forgot I'd booked a flight, so booked it again. Qantas noted I had two seats on the same flight, and 'helpfully' cancelled BOTH of them. So a bit of a risk. Also even if it lasts until the day, if the person for the second/third seat hasn't checked in for that ...


23

RyanAir is a point-to-point airline. From the point of view of RyanAir you were flying to the UK, and thus needed to be in possession of the needed documents to enter the UK. Rynair's T&C's mention the following: Article 7 - Refusing to carry a passenger 7.1 We may refuse to carry you or your baggage on any flights operated by an airline of the Ryanair ...


19

Yes, and it is often done. Not often so extreme as in your case, but it is possible, and I think I saw this few times in questions in this site (people that did it, not as duplicate of your question) Air France (as example, as in your question) has a hub in Paris. If they want to have you as their passenger, they must allow such fares. And baggage will be ...


19

I strongly recommend against double booking. For most airlines this violates the contract of carriage, so they have the right to cancel and they typically do. You can find Copa's contract of carriage here: https://www.copaair.com/en/web/us/contract-of-carriage In section 4.5.1 (c) it states 4.5.1. Reservation Cancellations. A reservation may be cancelled ...


18

I couldn't find a routing through Paris, but you can easily go from Delhi to Tokyo through Dubai on Emirates. That about 3.5 hours in pretty much the opposite direction.


18

The traveller owns the responsibility for ensuring they have all relevant valid travel documents or ability to transit or enter into countries, either their destination or any transit stop along the way. Airlines have no liability to the passenger for ensuring their documents are valid, or whether they actually have the ability to enter the destination ...


17

No, if they are booked separately, it is your sole responsibility to be there in time for the check-in and boarding deadlines of the second flight. If you miss it, you'll either have to change the booking (before the check-in deadline, usually, though it may depend on the fare, and possibly with penalties/fees and a fare difference), or book and pay for a ...


17

Your mother's green card allows her to be in the US, and to enter the US, but it has no relevance to Japan. Thus, with an expired Chinese passport and a US green card, she will be denied boarding for the Guam > Japan flight.


15

This is very frequent in Canada. There are a limited number of international destinations from Halifax, Nova Scotia (YHZ). However, with the exception of Newfoundland, it is the most eastern major city in Canada. So, if you are looking to fly east from Halifax, you would fly west to a larger city like Montreal or Toronto, and then onward to your next ...


14

Yes, if you visited those countries, you should include them on lists of countries that you've visited. While, as a practical matter, it might be the case that nobody ends up caring either way, it is always better to put the information than to leave it out and potentially get in trouble for failing to include it.


13

While the concept is interesting, it is unlikely except perhaps in very limited cases. The issue is that it is difficult to prevent you from leaving an airport. So, when boarding, you would have to meet the requirements of the destination country of your ticket. Simply telling the agent that you don't intend to leave will not make them waive pre-boarding ...


12

Separate Tickets It sounds like your charter flight is booked on a separate ticket than your flight from China to Narita. In this case the answer is unfortunately "this will not work". One hour and 40 minutes is NOT enough to make this connection n the best of times since you need to go through immigration, collect your luggage, go through customs,...


12

This document states: All tourists are required to hold a negative PCR test for COVID-19 conducted 96 hours prior the scheduled time of departure from the first port of embarkation enroute to Maldives. If the tourist makes a transit during the journey, the initial PCR test will be valid if the transit does not exceed 24 hours. If the tourist makes a ...


12

Ask at check-in but if nothing strange happens you will only get your luggage in Warsaw.


11

If your connecting flight is cancelled before you depart for NRT, the airline will update your itinerary, and you have the right to insist on a new itinerary, potentially through a different connecting airport, that is valid in terms of visas, COVID entry requirements etc. (That said, if they can't find one, the airline also has the right to cancel your ...


11

Yes you will need a visa, specifically the Visitor in Transit visa, but you may have a chance at transit-without-visa (as you fit some of the criteria there) although I wouldnt recommend just chancing it. Being that your flight leaves the next day, you cannot stay in Heathrow terminals overnight as they close to passengers and there are no airside hotels at ...


11

This is usually checked based on the expected transit time before you board the previous flights. An airline will always check if you meet the conditions for the destination and all transit points, based on their notion of what your itinerary is. (As an aside, remember that they do that to protect themselves, as countries will fine them if they let somebody ...


11

She does not have a passport, so it's possible that she will not be able to board the flight to Japan. A "domestic" flight from Guam to Mainland USA might be possible, but what you're describing is technically an "international" flight to Japan followed by another international flight to USA. If nothing goes wrong, you probably won't have ...


10

Unless you are living in Spain or a Spanish national, borders are closed at present (10 May 2020).  As JCaron pointed out, nobody knows whether it will be worse or better in July. But for today: These are the people who are exempt from border restrictions: Air, land and sea borders Only Spanish citizens or those who can prove residency in Spain by ...


10

I want to know who is to blame and what to do in the future in such a situation. As mentioned on If an airline erroneously refuses to check in a passenger on the grounds of incomplete paperwork (eg visa), is the passenger entitled to compensation? by JBentley, and relevant since Alicante is in the European Union, you're entitled to compulsory compensation: ...


10

The issue won't be the UK embassy, but the airline. With separate tickets, check-in companies usually won't consider you an airside transit passenger, the main reason being you're not "insured" if anything goes wrong with the connection, leaving you stuck in the transit area. As such, they'll most likely deny boarding on the flight to the UK. While ...


10

It's actually the same flight (TK181) which stops first in Mexico City (MEX), and then goes on to Cancun (CUN) after staying 1h30 in MEX. Depending on the airlines and airports, usually two things can happen: You stay on board during the stop. This is unlikely for a stop this long after a flight this long, though I have no experience of either TK nor MEX, ...


9

Each country has different rules. The US does not have the concept of "transit passenger" and you will have to enter the US by going through immigration and customs. However, from Vancouver this is done at "preclearance" which means you will be a domestic arrival in LAX and will not have to go through immigration at all there. In Auckland,...


9

Narita is not open 24 hours, so if your flight is on the next day you will have to enter Japan. In normal circumstances nationals of some countries could get a Shore Pass on arrival to stay overnight. Unfortunately at the current time you cannot do so because Japan has barred entry to all non-resident foreigners due to COVID-19. You will need to depart ...


9

So I wonder whether it would be possible to travel from transit zone to transit zone, No. When boarding a flight from A to B, the airline MUST check whether you meet immigration and Covid requirements for your destination country and will decline boarding if you can't show these. If you have a "good" passport you may be able to get away with the ...


8

If it's a single booking/ticket: depends If these are two separate bookings/tickets: yes


8

I have to applaud your inventiveness and perseverance on this topic. The issue is that the airline won't sell you #1 as a single "trip", but rather as two separate trips (outbound and inbound) on the same ticket, i.e. a return ticket. So when you check-in at CMB, they'll consider your final destination for that trip to be GRU, so shouldn't apply ...


7

Unfortunately, the Swiss airline email seems to be based on the IATA Information offered throught their Swiss Travel Regulations system. Full IATA Information: (Moscow-Zürich) SWISS displays this information provided by IATA only as a courtesy and accepts no responsibility for this third-party information. Passengers are not allowed to enter. [same as 2 ...


7

If the connection or one leg is cancelled, the entire itinerary is cancelled or rebooked. They will NOT fly you to Heathrow, if your connection is 3 days later. The only exception would be if the cancellation is out of the blue, i.e. not know when you board your flight in Sri Lanka. This is exceedingly rare and most airport/countries of emergency procedures ...


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