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36

RyanAir is to blame, as you followed the rules precisely for UK landside transit with an EU residence permit. Unfortunately, passenger recourse against such problems is difficult. You could try to claim EC261 compensation for denied boarding, and/or seek passenger rights help from Spanish authorities at seguridadaerea.gob.es. The rules are shown in Timatic, ...


34

Have they looked at the German Embassy site for New Zealand? The first link of that page leads to the Covid-19: Informationen für Reisende page that gives details about the present situation. Have they registred in the ELEFAND as well at the www.rueckholprogramm.de? the latter is needed so that the Embassy knows who needs help Hierfür gilt ...


28

For your proposed routing, Timatic currently says: Transit - Australia (AU) Passengers are not allowed to transit or enter Australia. Passengers departing from New Zealand with a confirmed onward ticket on the same calendar day to return home are allowed to transit through Australia. They must remain airside and must have not been in China (...


23

RyanAir is a point-to-point airline. From the point of view of RyanAir you were flying to the UK, and thus needed to be in possession of the needed documents to enter the UK. Rynair's T&C's mention the following: Article 7 - Refusing to carry a passenger 7.1 We may refuse to carry you or your baggage on any flights operated by an airline of the Ryanair ...


19

Yes, and it is often done. Not often so extreme as in your case, but it is possible, and I think I saw this few times in questions in this site (people that did it, not as duplicate of your question) Air France (as example, as in your question) has a hub in Paris. If they want to have you as their passenger, they must allow such fares. And baggage will be ...


18

First of all, "Any Permitted" printed on a ticket does not mean that any conceivable route is permitted; instead it means that you can travel by any route which is a permitted route. What is a permitted route, you may ask? The National Rail Conditions of Travel states: 13.1. Your Ticket may show that it is valid only on certain train services, such as ...


18

I couldn't find a routing through Paris, but you can easily go from Delhi to Tokyo through Dubai on Emirates. That about 3.5 hours in pretty much the opposite direction.


18

The traveller owns the responsibility for ensuring they have all relevant valid travel documents or ability to transit or enter into countries, either their destination or any transit stop along the way. Airlines have no liability to the passenger for ensuring their documents are valid, or whether they actually have the ability to enter the destination ...


17

I posted the question and have since heard from the Japanese Immigration Bureau: the answer is no, if you've been convicted of a felony you cannot land in Japan or transit through it.


17

No, if they are booked separately, it is your sole responsibility to be there in time for the check-in and boarding deadlines of the second flight. If you miss it, you'll either have to change the booking (before the check-in deadline, usually, though it may depend on the fare, and possibly with penalties/fees and a fare difference), or book and pay for a ...


15

This is very frequent in Canada. There are a limited number of international destinations from Halifax, Nova Scotia (YHZ). However, with the exception of Newfoundland, it is the most eastern major city in Canada. So, if you are looking to fly east from Halifax, you would fly west to a larger city like Montreal or Toronto, and then onward to your next ...


14

Yes, if you visited those countries, you should include them on lists of countries that you've visited. While, as a practical matter, it might be the case that nobody ends up caring either way, it is always better to put the information than to leave it out and potentially get in trouble for failing to include it.


12

Separate Tickets It sounds like your charter flight is booked on a separate ticket than your flight from China to Narita. In this case the answer is unfortunately "this will not work". One hour and 40 minutes is NOT enough to make this connection n the best of times since you need to go through immigration, collect your luggage, go through customs,...


11

The Deutschlandfunk news today talked about the recovery flights and mentioned that smaller Pacific islands were difficult, so they were going to stage the recovery through New Zealand. At a wild guess, the flight(s) would carry Germans stuck in NZ, too.


11

If your connecting flight is cancelled before you depart for NRT, the airline will update your itinerary, and you have the right to insist on a new itinerary, potentially through a different connecting airport, that is valid in terms of visas, COVID entry requirements etc. (That said, if they can't find one, the airline also has the right to cancel your ...


11

Yes you will need a visa, specifically the Visitor in Transit visa, but you may have a chance at transit-without-visa (as you fit some of the criteria there) although I wouldnt recommend just chancing it. Being that your flight leaves the next day, you cannot stay in Heathrow terminals overnight as they close to passengers and there are no airside hotels at ...


10

Your understanding is 100% correct (can't write anything more than that) If going back the same way, however, you'll clear US immigration in Seattle, then collect and re-check your luggage at the designated counter after customs.


10

Unless you are living in Spain or a Spanish national, borders are closed at present (10 May 2020).  As JCaron pointed out, nobody knows whether it will be worse or better in July. But for today: These are the people who are exempt from border restrictions: Air, land and sea borders Only Spanish citizens or those who can prove residency in Spain by ...


10

I want to know who is to blame and what to do in the future in such a situation. As mentioned on If an airline erroneously refuses to check in a passenger on the grounds of incomplete paperwork (eg visa), is the passenger entitled to compensation? by JBentley, and relevant since Alicante is in the European Union, you're entitled to compulsory compensation: ...


9

(this post assumes you are on a regular rail ticket that is not route or operator restricted, oyster/"contactless" has it's own rules, which may be more or less restrictive than a regular rail ticket) Can I use any route to get to my destination on national rail? No, you can't just take any route. Unfortunately the rules on what routes you can and ...


9

Each country has different rules. The US does not have the concept of "transit passenger" and you will have to enter the US by going through immigration and customs. However, from Vancouver this is done at "preclearance" which means you will be a domestic arrival in LAX and will not have to go through immigration at all there. In Auckland,...


9

Narita is not open 24 hours, so if your flight is on the next day you will have to enter Japan. In normal circumstances nationals of some countries could get a Shore Pass on arrival to stay overnight. Unfortunately at the current time you cannot do so because Japan has barred entry to all non-resident foreigners due to COVID-19. You will need to depart ...


8

If it's a single booking/ticket: depends If these are two separate bookings/tickets: yes


7

Unfortunately, the Swiss airline email seems to be based on the IATA Information offered throught their Swiss Travel Regulations system. Full IATA Information: (Moscow-Zürich) SWISS displays this information provided by IATA only as a courtesy and accepts no responsibility for this third-party information. Passengers are not allowed to enter. [same as 2 ...


7

If the connection or one leg is cancelled, the entire itinerary is cancelled or rebooked. They will NOT fly you to Heathrow, if your connection is 3 days later. The only exception would be if the cancellation is out of the blue, i.e. not know when you board your flight in Sri Lanka. This is exceedingly rare and most airport/countries of emergency procedures ...


7

Do the best you can. I provided a list of about a dozen countries that I still could remember and added a disclaimer "This is our best estimate based on an anaylysis of past travel records". That seemed to work fine. It would be good to go through your passport and make sure that all stamps that are in there are covered in the list. Make also sure ...


7

Does anyone know if US Citizens can transit (without leaving the airport) through countries that restrict travel due to COVID? That depends on the transit country. Some ban transit (e.g., Thailand), some don't, and some allow transit with some restrictions (e.g., Japan, Philippines). See https://www.iatatravelcentre.com/international-travel-document-news/...


6

Generally an airline is responsible for your connection between flights issued on a single ticket. Airports have a minimum connection time which limits how short a connection is allowed when ticketing. That time sometimes depends on factors like terminal changes but is in my opinion highly optimistic. When you buy from a third-party agent you are not always ...


6

After flying this itinerary, I can narrate my experience for any future travellers along this route. The answer given by @hilmar is more or less accurate. Please note that if you happen to choose this itinerary with Singapore Airlines, then you need to arrange for your own transport between airports along with your check-in luggage. I am talking ...


6

The cheapest way will be to use the RER taking about an hour, but this means you will have to transfer lines. The ticket costs under €5 and you use it for both trains. You can buy these at the machines in any station. From Gare Du Nord you take either the B or D line to Châtelet - Les Halles. (The train will read as GARE DE CORBEIL, and you get off on the ...


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