Hot answers tagged

102

According to this link (only in German), it is to check if you have bought the ticket just right now or a sufficient amount of time before. The rules usually are, that you have to buy a ticket before you get on the train. Now, with mobile tickets, some "clever" people thought, they just need to buy a ticket when they see the conductor, and to ride free when ...


74

UK train tickets are among the most expensive in Europe; this image below from The Telegraph is quoted a lot of times in the press and on social media trying to show the disparity with other European countries for: While it does include a lot of cherry-picking, and doesn't really address why train fares are so expensive (which is still up to debate both by ...


59

Short answer. Hyperdia is correct; you can take the Hikari 535 service at 20:33. Long answer. Hikari 535 is an irregularly-scheduled service: it does not have a regular schedule like "every day" or "every weekday", but rather it runs only on specified days, presumably when high demand is anticipated. The timetable you linked, published on JR Central's ...


58

Your £133 train ticket isn't tied to a specific connection like your cheap plane ticket is. For some random dates in April I was offered a return for £52 (two singles at £25 and £27 each). These tickets are sold out for your dates, so you're only offered the more expensive semi-flexible tickets. Always keep in mind the varying conditions when comparing ...


49

@dunni's answer describes the attack that this security measure attempts to mitgate. A comment on his answer claims that this is "security theatre"; I describe in this answer (because this explanation is too long to fit into a comment) why it is not. Most security measures cannot completely prevent attacks. An effective security measure is one that ...


42

Ticket barriers still have to be manned, because a human is still needed to deal with tickets that have got demagnetised, those where the magstripe was never correctly written in the first place, creased/crumpled tickets, jammed readers, and so on. Cambridge has a CTA, and I've never been refused access without a ticket to the platform when I had a reason ...


41

TL;DR: Your ticket is still valid and you can take any connection to your destination (and it is not relevant if you booked a SuperSparpreis, Sparpreis or Flexpreis ticket) if your train/connection is expected to be delayed by at least 20 minutes at your destination or is cancelled at all. For more information have a look at Overview of the main passengers' ...


40

(I read the question title "Munich from Rome" and therefore this is a northbound description, but the route should by symmetrical in the opposite direction) You can't do this entirely by train avoiding long tunnels, but you can take a combination of trains and buses, essentially take trains to the foot of the Alps, buses across the big passes, then get on ...


38

The chances of you being "denied boarding" are very low. There is no pre boarding check, nobody is standing at the door counting passengers. So there is nobody to deny you boarding. What is possible is that the train is physically so full that the train cannot leave, and when it does happen it usually escalates to the point where a train will be ...


36

Forget it. That space is stuffed solid! The US national rail system is privately owned, relatively unregulated, and reasonably profitable. It handles almost exclusively freight. Freight business in the US has been very, very good. It's a highly productive country still with a lot of industry, that is too dry and rugged to have an extensive canal system. ...


33

A few issues to think about: There are plenty of other trains running on those tracks - freight, commuter trains, maintenance vehicles, etc. The tracker simply doesn't show them. Only a small fraction of the track used by Amtrak is actually owned by Amtrak (mostly along the Northeast Corridor). The rest belongs to various private railroads and Amtrak pays ...


32

There is already a good answer: It provides an additional quick visual indicator in case the passenger bought the ticket only after entering the vehicle and spotting the conductor. But let's add some more context. Ticket controls do not usually pay for themselves with fines. Ticket controls are paid for by getting more people to buy tickets. The goal of ...


31

As long as you stay within the Schengen Area, you should be able to travel freely without any systematic passport checks, so in most cases, it looks exactly like domestic travel. The Schengen Area is composed of 22 of the 28 EU member states, as well as some other non-EU states such as Switzerland. Germany and Austria are both part of the Schengen Area. ...


31

The Hyperdia screenshot gives a hint: the curled arrow indicates backtracking, and that makes this trip a bit special. Here's a (simplified) diagram of the relevant train lines: To Asahikawa ^ | | Hakodate Main Line | | Shiroishi @==================> To New Chitose Airport | Chitose ...


30

When you have a train ticket this is a commitment by the railways to get you to your destination. In your case your ticket is for Brussels to Den Haag so to Den haag the railways must get you. But it doesn’t have to be with the trains you originally intended to use. The fact that you change in Breda tells me you have a ticket for the IC train. That ticket ...


28

No, you definitely cannot count on having vegetarian meals on long-distance trains in Russia. In fact even the menu is misleading, as quite commonly only a very limited selection of dishes are actually available on any given train. Beware that fresh/hot food selections at stations are also quite limited, and vegetarian options even more so. (They've ...


26

If it's an advance, then no, advance tickets need to follow the route exactly ("You may not start, break and resume, or end your journey at any intermediate station except to change to/from connecting trains as shown on the ticket(s) or other valid travel itinerary."). From a practicality point of view, the train guard would almost certainly not know, but ...


26

You can change boarding point any time you like after booking the ticket, so that you don't have to cancel the ticket and buy another. Railway will cancel your ticket if they can't find you in a fixed number of stops and will assign your reserved seat to a person who boarded the train with waiting list ticket. Also, some stations will have a fixed quota of ...


26

I have been in Bristol Temple Meads many times, though I have not made connections there. Each track has stairs (there are also elevators) down to a tunnel (subway), and you can see signs in the tunnel pointing up to the other tracks. https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Bristol_Temple_Meads_passenger_subway.jpg If your train comes in on time, you ...


25

It's not usually cheaper to fly. But since UK rail ticketing is ridiculously complicated, it is often difficult to find the cheapest option. In theory, there are 40 different advance fares in second class between Manchester Picadilly and Aberdeen, as you can see through brfares.com, varying in price from £20.50 to £89.50, with each of those advanced fares ...


25

You can finish your journey at any Underground station in Zone 1 or 2. You entered Old Street in the booking engine, but the national ticketing system can't sell tickets to a specific Underground station, so it sold you a (more flexible) alternative. Bear in mind that once you've left the Underground, the ticket isn't valid for any further journeys, unlike ...


23

It's pretty small marginals we're talking about (trains hardly ever crash in the first place), but I don't think the type of car matters as much as where in the train. Most collisions involve the front end of at least one train -- and most derailments involve something going wrong with the first bogie, since that will meet hazards on the track first. So for ...


23

You can check this by trying to book a reservation on bahn.de - Select "Reservation only" on the main page, then search for your train, try to make a reservation (without logging in), click on "select seat" and the layout of the coach will be shown. For the 20th of December, an ICE train type is used for which seats 13 and 15 are next to each other and ...


23

You don't need to go somewhere else (by cab or similar) from the airport to reach a train. It has a station called "Flughafen Wien Bahnhof", which is easily accessible from the terminal buildings without even going outside any buildings. You exit to baggage claim, and then the way to the station is marked by signage. In the station, there is three platforms, ...


22

The information provided by The Trainline is admittedly very poorly explained, and appallingly formatted. The information provided by National Rail is a bit better. Each restriction code states when and/or on what train(s) the ticket is not valid and the days and/or dates that these restrictions apply. Restrictions do not generally apply at weekends or on ...


20

It is recommended to tip: The Complete North American Train Travel Guide,” recommends $5 per passenger per night for sleeping-car attendants, and the standard 15 percent of what the meals would cost if you paid (prices are on the menu) outright. (Seattle Times)


19

According to the following source: Interrail.eu the age at the first day of your travel is important. The reduced prices can be found in the price lists of the Interrail Pass under the "Youth" tab. If you are at least 28 years old on the first day of your Interrail trip, you will need an Adult Pass.


19

Inspired by @gerrit's answer, this one has one tunnel that is 5865 m long (and can be avoided with a 30 minute bus ride), but otherwise all other tunnels are much shorter. Roma-Firenze-Bologna-Milano: you will probably have to take regional trains, as the high-speed line has many tunnels: Roma-Firenze has 5 tunnels over 3 km (longest 10.5 km), Firenze-...


18

There is only one Japan Rail Pass. (Well, two: ordinary and Green Car aka First Class.) Any notional differences you're seeing are only because the rules are very complicated and not all sites selling them will get into all the gruesome details. The "Scope of Validity" section on the official JRP site below has the full scoop if you're curious. The Japan ...


18

One of the big differences between UK and EU rail pricing, is that the UK uses the supply and demand and Willingness To Pay (WTP) pricing model similar to that used by airlines, while many EU train services use a much simpler €/km pricing model. This way, in the UK you get odd things like a short rail journey costing (say) £9.40 single and just £9.60 return;...


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