Hot answers tagged

32

Towels are 50/50 possible, depening on country and hostel. More hostels will rent towels, sometimes at a nominal price. One hostel I worked in in Australia used to provide free towels but we discovered we were often paying overtime to our laundry staff because people would use many towels just because they were free! We introduced a $1 fee per towel, ...


17

These are standard radiator thermostat valves. They are usually marked 0 — off (most thermostat valve heads don't have this setting) ❄ — anti-frost (usually 6°C) 1 — 12°C ☽ — energy saving (usually 14°C) 2 — 16°C 3 — 20°C 4 — 24°C 5 — 28°C Note these are target room temperatures. Regardless at which setting you put the thermostat, if the air around the ...


17

Yes, it is correct and fine to wipe your hand, face, neck with it, be it with hot or cold towels. You can see that pretty much everywhere in Asia. In Japan, you will be given one at hairdressers to specifically to wipe your face with it. Specially when it's hot and humid outside, a cold towel on your neck is something very nice!


16

Almost always, you bring your own, however... Hostel sites like Hostelbookers often indicate whether or not items like towels are available for rent, or provided. Some I've seen will sell toothpaste and deodorant and the like. Personally, I bring a towel and toiletries, and almost always I've needed them. It's generally a surprise when I don't.


13

A towel is required. And it has to be large enough. You are supposed to sit or to lie on it. One towel can be enough. However, a second towel and/or a bathrobe can be useful too, when you are relaxing outside the sauna. In most of the saunas you can rent towels and bathrobes. If 80x60 refer to centimeters, than it's not enough. You have to fit on the towel,...


11

Depending on the hotel, there could be several instances you require a towel, and different ones with different sizes for each of these. Without a great sense of scale we'll have to guess at which is which in your photo, but in general you may need them for: bath/shower towel hand/towel spa towel (may cover part of body) massage towel (may cover part of ...


10

These are for washing your hands and/or face, often after the in-flight beverage, snack, or meal.


8

Why not doing the obvious? Tell the reception, they are where they are and they are paid exactly to listen to your needs and try to reasonably satisfy them. Easier then ever, just tell'em when you check-in; I do so all times, and never had any problem nor anybody charged me additional money or yelled at me for asking it.


7

Where I'm working they have 4 different ones. I'll start from biggest then to smallest: Towel - To dry off after a shower Bath - To step on after shower Hand - used to dry hands after you wash them. Duh Face - the smallest towel for the face


7

To be sure, you should ask the resort, as this is a matter of policy for each resort/hotel, and there is no universal rule. In general, I would expect there to be rules against taking hotel/resort property off the premises, but I would also expect that it is common to make exceptions if you were to ask--and possibly pay a deposit. The other option is to ...


7

As already mentioned toiletries are very rare. Towels depend a lot but if the hostel doesn't provide them for free they usually provide them for a fee (all the cases I've witnessed were for an affordable fee). I was never in an hostel without toilet paper. In the worst case if you ask at the reception they will quickly solve that. A rare case, but that you ...


6

Hotels are targeting businessmen travelling with a briefcase. You usually don't carry soap or towel in your suitcase. Hostels are targeting backpackers which are expected to bring a lot of things with them. While all the hostels I've stayed in had soap in the bathroom, and they've also provided towels (some for free, some for an extra charge). Shampoo, ...


6

Most places have a policy requiring towels and also a rule with says "no sweat on the wood". You will need to have a towel big enough to cover the area to sit and for your feet. Just make sure that wherever you might drop sweat its covered by your towel. No one will measure your towel, just stick to this rule.


5

Yes, all towels are replaced when a customer leaves the hotel even if they look untouched. This is a common procedure in hotels. You can find some hotels where the management is trying to save money and will eventually not replace all but by default, in the vast majority of hotels, they are replaced. Source : some housekeeping executives I have been ...


5

On some Asian airlines such as Korean and JAL you will be given real hot towels shortly before each meal. Just like in some Asian restaurants. This is for cleaning your hands. I've never been sure whether I should also use it on my face, either in a restaurant or plane. I have done so and it's very refreshing, but I'm not sure if the Asians also use it that ...


4

Look at the thing, use it as you would use a towel of the same size and consistency at home. As said, the one in the shower stall is almost certainly not a towel at all but a floor mat to prevent you slipping when drying yourself after stepping out of the shower (and soak up the water you drip on the floor). There's really no mystery to towels (apart from ...


3

In Japan, it's considered slightly gauche to do this. It's the kind of thing expected of a "country" person, or an oji-san (old man). I don't think anyone will find it offensive or disgusting. The vast majority of people won't care at all. And, if you are a westerner, you're not expected to follow (or even be aware of) Japanese customs, anyway. In China, it'...


3

To answer the second part of the question: Saunas often provide towels and bathrobes (the latter might be mandatory in the bar/restaurant area, when there is one) but I have never seen them included in the entry price. Often, the sauna sells towels (as opposed to lending/renting them). In any case, it would always cost something on top of the regular price ...


3

When I travel with a big towel, rare as it is, I will almost every night use it as an extra blanket. Most of the time I travel a small towel, the size many people use as a tea towel, those I only use as an extra blanket when I feel extra cold or then the blankets are too light. (I sleep better with an heavy load of blankets.) It takes care to keep it on me ...


2

The towel of course helps a lot if you sweat while hitch-hiking. Secondly, in case of a small cut leading to bleeding, you will need to tie it around the wound to stop bleeding profusely. Towels can be used to tie up stuff and carry easily which might be wet, or not fit to keep inside your bags directly because of other reasons. In case of extremely hot ...


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