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2

I've had important documents such as a birth certificate laminated before and it did cause problems. It should be accepted as it doesn't have to be stamped or anything. If you want to get a copy as laminated documents make it really hard to detect important security features. On a side note I found this on the UK GOV website relating to a passport ...


2

As far as I can tell, the Vietnamese government does not publish any list (at least not in any language I understand) of authorised travel agents to issue a pre-approval VoA letter. I can vouch from personal experience that this unusal route of obtaining a letter from a travel agent is legitimate, however there is no way of you knowing if you have received a ...


2

Neither country requires visa applicants to apply from their country of citizenship, so you can apply from Germany. You can apply online for both countries. Fill out the online application form, and scan and upload supporting documents. For Australia, the process is entirely electronic as applications from Germany are (as of time of writing) not required ...


1

In theory, the Business eVisa is for business purposes only, not tourism. However, the allowed business purposes are so broadly worded that virtually anything qualifies: if you buy a souvenir, you could argue that this is "trade" or "sales/purchases". For technical and business meetings. To set up Industrial or business venture. To deliver lectures under ...


2

It depends on your nationality. While I can't guess your nationality, if you are not part of the 24 excluded countries, you should be able to enter without visa. If you are part of the 24 countries, you're out of luck; you will need a visa. Tourists in transit to Third Countries 1. Eligible Applicants Nationals of ...


2

I am not sure if your profession qualifies to obtain an e-visa for Kuwait. Their list of acceptable professions for GCC residence permit holders is very short. But you can try to apply for the e-visa at their official web site. You can apply for an e-visa if you are one of a few listed nationalities, or any nationality can apply who has a GCC residence ...


1

We went for 21 days, we spent 4 nights in Hungary, 5 in Paris, 6 in Spain and a couple here and there in Belgium and Germany. You should have applied for the visa at the Spanish consulate, since the primary portion of you visit was in Spain (6 days). Had you also stayed in Hungary (where you applid for the visa) for 6 days, then the country you entered ...


6

Your mother is allowed six months per visit, as you know. Leaving after six months for just a few days, returning for another four months will look very much like she's trying to live in the US. She risks being refused entry. This is at the discretion of the border guard, who is required to presume immigrant intent. She may have been allowed entry under ...


0

There is no legal limit on how much time you can spend in the United States in B-2 status within any 12 month period. Admission will generally be limited to 6 months at a time but it is not impossible to be admitted for another 6 month period shortly after a previous visit has ended. Given your circumstances it seems likely that you would be admitted for ...


1

Your understanding is correct. You can be admitted for up to 6 months and there is no rule preventing that. Or the officer can, in his/her discretion, admit you for shorter than 6 months or deny you entry altogether.


3

What you're doing is called visa-shopping, and it's frowned upon by the Schengen countries. The rules say that you should apply to the country that is the main purpose of your visit, or where you'll spend most time. For your original plan, the Czech Republic is the place to apply. If the immigration officers suspect what's really gone on they can make life ...


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