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30

You have plenty of time to see the Falls, go on the boat, and cross the bridge to the American side if you like. I would recommend renting a car from the airport, if you can drive. I'd expect to pay 40 CAD for a one day rental. On top of that, you'll need to pay for any fuel you use. As I remember, parking was free when I went, this a few years ago now. ...


26

You'll clear immmigration and become a temporary resident at your first port of entry into Canada. You told us that you would be entering at Vancouver, so this is where immigration will take place. After you clear immigration in Vancouver, you can do whatever you wish, provided you eventually get to your university in Toronto. Hopefully before classes start!...


25

The Bank of Canada addresses this in their FAQ on the new polymer notes: All notes issued by the Bank of Canada since 1935 have legal tender status and retain their full value. If you don't know how to check notes from past series, exchange them for newer ones at your local bank. You should have no trouble spending them, though if you just want to be ...


24

So here's what actually happened. The 2004 notes were accepted without hesitation at a variety of restaurants, shops, etc. The 1979 notes were refused by the first place I tried to spend one, a Starbucks. However, a branch of BMO (Bank of Montreal) was happy to exchange them for new notes, even though I didn't have an account there.


23

In most border towns you can, further away not. Sometimes they might also give you small change back in CAD, or charge you a small fee for using USD. If you exchange the money in a bank you will get a much better rate. Try to pay with your Credit card whenever possible.


23

Greyhound provides a locator on their website. Just type in the city where you're stopping and it will give you the station(s) there and their addresses, even phone number and hours. That's tricky to answer, it depends on where you're going, whether there's an event there, what time of day, etc., but generally my experience with bus travel is always the ...


23

This is called short-checking. You can always ask but they do not always accept, particularly if your connection is short on time. However in this case it does not matter. Even if they tag your luggage to YUL, you must take it through customs yourself when you enter Canada which is in Toronto for you. At that point you will just be able to exit the airport ...


21

Welcome to bus travel! :-) I work for Busbud, a bus travel site. This trip requires you to take three buses each way A long trip on Greyhound from Toronto to Chicago, crossing the border at Windsor/Detroit. A short hop from Chicago up to Milwaukee on Greyhound. A medium distance trip across Wisconsin operated by Greyhound's partner company Jefferson Lines. ...


20

No. I've lived in Montreal and Toronto and the occasional place will take US dollars, but most places will just laugh at you, perhaps in French. If they do take it, they might give you 80 cents on the dollar or so. Just use credit for everything. There's really no reason not to.


16

The FirstOntario Centre is in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, not Toronto. I've never lived in Hamilton, so I don't know how people talk about it there. It used to be called the Copps Coliseum, and was originally built to try to attract an NHL team to Hamilton. Hamilton is a city about 70km west of Toronto. As for your other questions, depending on where you ...


15

Ottawa we can pretty safely drop from the list -- as a planned city populated mostly by government bureaucrats, it's got a few good museums but very little else to interest the casual visitor, and it's quite hard to get around without a car. Montreal vs Toronto is a more interesting showdown. Personally, I'd cast my vote for Montreal: it feels a bit ...


15

Here are some things not covered in other answers: In larger cities, the Greyhound stop will be an actual station, where you will go inside a terminal, find the correct gate, and get on a bus. Unlike airlines, you do not need to "check in". Generally the departure gates are fixed by destination, so a bus going to a given destination almost always leaves ...


13

No, Hamilton is not considered part of "Toronto". It is not even part of the Greater Toronto Area, which I would use as the limit of areas that are not Toronto but that people might refer to as Toronto nonetheless. If I lived in Hamilton and wanted to explain it to someone in Japan, I might say that I lived "near Toronto". I live in Toronto and did not even ...


12

It depends what you define as Northern Ontario and how much you want to see. Some places (Moosonee and Moose Factory for example) are train only. Many are bus only. You can fly to Sudbury on a regularly scheduled commercial flight. Heck, some people might consider Peterborough or Barrie to be northern, and you can take Go Transit (commuter trains and buses) ...


12

Usually, yes. But now that the US dollar isn't more valuable (and is fluctuating wildly from week to week) I've noticed more places not taking it or taking it at a steep discount. You won't get the value you used to out of it. It's always a good idea to have some local currency on hand no matter where you're going. A credit card will also work, though there ...


12

No, there really are no cheap flights from Toronto to Resolute Bay. This is a known problem, as small communities are hundreds of km from each other and thousands of km from any road. Long distance flights in often hazardous conditions with small aeroplanes. It means the local Inuit (unlike the extremely well-paid miners) are often unable to visit each ...


12

There are multiple methods that can by used by customs to determine the value of the goods being imported. There is a Valuation Page of CBSA that describes all the possible scenarios that can happen but the short list is: Transaction value method - Section 48 of the Act Transaction value of identical goods method - Section 49 of the Act ...


12

TL;DR: Try go catch the 8:20 Via Rail from Union Station to Niagara Falls, arriving 10:16, if it runs on your day. If not, public transportation is going to be very time-consuming but possible. It's quite possible to get from Toronto Pearson via Union Station to Niagara Falls, but you won't have a lot of time left to spend there. The cheapest way to get ...


12

I live in Hamilton. I usually tell people "I live in Hamilton, that's near Toronto". Assuming you're coming from outside of North America (Australia?), I would recommend flying into Pearson Airport in Toronto (YYZ). It's a global airport with lots of flights. Public transportation to downtown Hamilton is cheap and fairly easy (coach, travel time about 1 ...


11

The intercontinental hotel next to Union Station will store luggage for non-guests for $3 per item [ed: $5 as of June 2018, cash only]. I know this won't be much use to the original poster but its hopefully useful to anyone Googles the same question in future.


11

I think your friends are rather misinformed. I am unaware of parks closing at any point during the year apart from the occasional holiday or similar occurrence. For example, the Oka national park is open all year round as can be seen here: Parc national d'Oka is open year-round from 8 a.m. until sunset. Source Basically, visit the information page of ...


10

Anecdotal answer: I've been in Vancouver a week now, and noticed I keep being given American coins as change. Certainly the pennies, nickels, dimes and quarters seem interchangeable; the locals never even blink at accepting them.


9

If those are your three choices, I'd suggest Montreal. Montreal and Ottawa are a less than two hours from eachother, so you can easily take a morning train and spend the day there, before returning to Montreal. Ottawa is a beautiful city, and is home to some of the best museums in the world (see Museum of Civilization, Air and Space Museum, and more). Also ...


9

Porter Airlines offers flights from Toronto's City Center Airport to Boston which are not available through big travel agencies like Expedia. Their convenient city center airport can save taxi fare to the airport. Yes, this does involve flying.


9

I'd recommend the Niagara Air Bus! My parents lived near Niagara Falls and I used to take it there and back. They run hourly I believe. They used to drop my off and pick me at my parent's front door so you'd certainly get dropped off and picked up at a convenient location. Best thing about them they're savy about getting you to the airport in time for your ...


8

Depending on your budget the service that would be the least hassle, and the most flexible would probably be bus. The train doesn't stop too many places up there unless your'e going into the interior on Ontario Northland (and that's only because you can choose where to stop), and VIA isn't the cheapest option out there.


8

Contrary to the popular opinion I would strongly recommend against the trains. Reason being the trains run slower then buses, for example the Maple Leaf which runs NYP-Toronto runs 12h 30min and makes a bunch of stops. Adirondak which runs NYP-Montreal is kind of in the same boat and runs 10h 30min. Granted that a big chunk of both runs along the Hudson ...


8

Your best bet for public transport access to the Ontario North is Ontario Northland. They run scheduled buses from Toronto to the north, including Temagami (but not Hiawatha, wherever that is). It is quite a trip, stopping at various small towns you won't get to otherwise. If you want to get to the real remote areas your best bet is the Polar Bear Express ...


8

I havent' done it myself, but a friend of mine that I know used to do long haul in that stretch of the country, so I'll relay his findings Chicago has to be a stop on your journey, especially if youre' a sports fan. Being the only four sports town on your route outside of Detroit, there's guarenteed to be a game playing whenever you decide to drive through. ...


8

As has been extensively reported elsewhere, Canadian taxes and fees are considerably higher for air travel than American taxes and fees. On the one hand, the U.S. subsidizes its airports (for example, supplying TSA agents and FAA air traffic controllers) allowing them to charge lower rents and passenger facility charges than their Canadian counterparts; ...


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