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18

The word you are looking for is haikyo (廃墟, "ruin"), and Japan has plenty of them for pretty much every conceivable category of building... except temples and shrines. Unlike corporate enterprises that get abandoned as soon as they stop making money, temples and shrines were never intended as money-making enterprises in the first place, so their costs are ...


12

Yes, you are allowed to enter temples - where entry to a person from another religion is allowed - alone. You can visit and enter many of the temples without any issues, but be careful that the people are very sensitive about religion and temples. Some temples don't even allow people of other religion to enter the temple premises. Added : Some temples ...


11

Great answer by jpatokal. One more thing to add to the kaimyō topic is that Japanese temples are run by private people as a business under something you could call a "religion business license" which is 100% tax-free. These businesses however do not only operate religious services such as funerals but also a lot of other non-religious operations such as golf ...


11

TL;DR: Don't worry about it. I've stayed in lots of temples and shrines in Japan, and their accommodations are effectively identical to "secular" Japanese inns: for example, you'll be offered alcohol with meals, and boisterous drinking parties for traveling groups are not uncommon, particularly in Shinto shrine lodges. Of course, the usual rules of ...


10

General considerations There are several temples in the Kyoto area as well as Osaka which allow you to do this. However, not everyone every day. So you should check one of the several different lists of temples (one, two, three) offering anything between overnight stays, vegetarian food, copying sutras with a brush pen (which cleanses your mind), zazen ...


7

You do not have to donate anything in a hindu temple but you as a foreigner some priests may expect money from you. They even ask you to donate 500 rupees (about 7$) or even more. As mentioned above you don`t have to donate anything. In some temples you will not get any mark on the forehead (it is called "Tilaka or Tilak") or anything like that unless you ...


7

No, there are no dress codes at temples or shrines. The Japanese attitude to religion is very relaxed... and simultaneously strict, as entry to anything even vaguely holy is generally entirely prohibited. That said, the prevailing Japanese opinion is that men's shorts above the knee are for elementary school students and the beach, although nobody will ...


6

Mt. Fuji is one of Japan's "Three Holy Mountains" (三霊山 Sanreizan) along with Mt. Tate, in the Toyama Prefecture, and Mt. Haku, in the Hokuriku region. If you want to be immersed in Shinto religion, I'd recommend visiting Kyoto. There's lot of temples and shrines to see, and lots to do and even more to eat. Spending just a day there wouldn't do the city ...


6

When I went to Japan I wanted to hunt for some abandoned places as well, even though I was mostly interested in modern-looking places like Nara Dreamland. Anyway, my starting point was Jordy Meow's site. He is a French photographer based in Tokyo specializing in urban exploration. Temple of Lies* is just an example. Beware that he doesn't give any ...


6

Using your image search, I clicked some of the images to be taken to the pages they came from. One, a blog entry on English in Taiwan, was very useful. It includes this map at the bottom of the page: It also mentions that this is a glass copy of a famous temple, that it's on the grounds of a glass factory, and how to visit. Seems like it has all you need.


5

Per this site, it's at Chang Hua County, Lu Gang Township, Lu Gong South 4th Road #30, here. Booking a tour appears to be available


5

Indeed as Doc says, it was Wat Sok Pa Luang, more commonly written as Wat Sokpaluang or, in Lao, "ວັດໂສກປ່າຫຼວງ". Sokpaluang is also the name of the suburb or region of Vientiane where it's located. The Wat is apparently also known as "The Jungle Temple". Sadly, in answer to the part of your question If it still exists? and according to reviewers on ...


5

Sounds like you're referring to 'Wat Sok Pa Luang'. I haven't been, but a few of the people I was traveling with in Laos did go and seemed to enjoy it. Any of the local taxi or tuk-tuk drivers will know how to get there. I don't recall the price, but I'm sure now that you know the name Google will be able to give you no end of information on it.


5

Regarding all 'major' temples, visitors are not allowed to enter them. According to the official Acropolis restoration service: Why is it not possible to visit the interiors of the monuments? There are two reasons why it is not permissible to enter the interiors of the monuments: in order to protect the monuments from the additional weight ...


5

The Daisen-in and Shunkoin have open medidation meetings (Information in English, the latter explicitly says instruction is in English), not free but reasonably priced. According to this forum: Rinzai and Soto zen temples should have a weekly zazenkai that is open to the public. It should be free, but donations are accepted (and probably expected, but ...


4

This is an old question but there is a lot of conflicting information above, and much it conflicts with my personal experience living on Ikoma Mountain in 2000-2001 (at the time of this writing I live in Okinawa, and the situation isn't entirely different). I lived in front of a large shrine called 石切神社 in Eastern Osaka. (Oh! it has its own website now! (O.o)...


4

Japanese temples don't provide place for meditation for random people, it's only for real followers and pilgrims. Several temples allow to stay for a night only for a fee, again you can only see ceremonies from side. All temples allowing tourists I know are not Zen as it's not the main school in Japan. But they require booking and have queue, they prefer ...


3

As much and as little as you want. In comparison, In Europe, when visiting a nice church, I will sometimes leave a few coins or something like that, maybe up to 1 dollar, but usually a quarter. (or Euro equivalent)


3

As far as I remember, there was a separate entry for mothers with infants. They would wait at the main entrance (probably were given a specific time slot) and I've heard that this kind of darshan is hassle-free for the whole family with infants. See if this helps.


3

It is very difficult to get direct darshan. I heard there is a provision of special direct darshan if you have a letter from any central/state minister. Or the pedestrian pilgrims have provision to get direct darshan. Anyway the crowd depends on the time of the year you are visiting. I visited there in December,2013 with a Rs : 50 ticket. We had to wait for ...


3

Hatsumōde (the year's first visit of a Shinto shrine, less commonly a Buddhist temple) happens not necessarily on the 1st - some people do it on the 2nd or 3rd (or already on new year's eve). Expect popular shrines such as the Meiji Shrine to be extremely crowded so that it can take an hour or more to get to the front - but many people will wear traditional ...


3

Shinto is at heart an animist religion that imbues many natural features (rivers, trees, mountains) with spirits, and Japanese buddhism has been influenced heavily by this, so yes, "sacred mountains" are pretty common in Japan. For Buddhism, sacredness is usually centered around places where famous Buddhist teachers lived, taught or are buried. The two ...


2

You might interested in Kawaradera Temple Ruins in Nara.


2

The Parthenon is undergoing extensive restoration work so you cannot enter it. You can get close enough to get a good view of the structure.


2

Yes, indeed. According to GreekReporter.com: A new half marathon race, the Poseidon Challenge, will be held for the first time on October 2 at the southest part of Attica, at Sounio Cape. The race will link the Temple of Poseidon with the ancient theatre of Thoricus near Lavrio, the most ancient theatre in Greece. If half-marathons are special enough for ...


2

There is a special privilege for the devotees with infants. They have a separate Q-Line. Hope this post might help you: Special Entry Darshan for Parents with Infants ( Below 1 Yr) » Darshan Token Price: Free » Darshan Timings: 11:00 AM to 8:00 PM (Monday to Sunday) » Reporting Place: Supatham (It is between Vaikuntam Queue complex-I and ...


2

There is one Zen Temple which does English in Kyoto. shunkoin.com/Accomodation.html I would suggest you contact them about long term arrangements. If you are a student and under 30, with some Japanese proficiency. http://nagaokazenjuku.or.jp/english/index.html#sixth Can't make it to Japan? http://global.sotozen-net.or.jp/eng/temples/outside_jp/index.html


1

I was not able to find any Zen temples in Uji that run any regular events, but apparently there is a Kyoto-based yoga instructor called Azusa Morishima who organizes occasional retreats at a "secret temple" there. Here's a Facebook post about a previous event, which sounds exactly like what you're looking for (experiencing a monk's life, tea sampling, ...


1

I'd say a few hours will suffice, it's not that big a site. I'd actually recommend visiting Prambanan the day before going to Borobudur, since it'll still feel impressive that way around. The best approach is to hit Prambanan in the afternoon, drive up to Borobudur, stay at the Manohara lodge on the park grounds, and use their sunrise tour package to visit ...


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