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89

In India, never drink tap water without boiling it. In Delhi, when you ask nicely at any restaurant, they will usually get your bottles filled with hot water. There will be proper filtered water available in most hotels and hostels where you can fill up. The blue drums will be found in many places and you can ask where any of those are found. Also, bottled ...


82

Commonly in the UK, cold water may be stored in open (or roughly covered) tanks in the roofspace. Such water, while it will have been drinkable mains water when it arrived is considered non-potable as there is no knowing what might have contaminated it while sitting in the tank. Contrary to the other answer, it is very unlikely that grey water is coming ...


68

Almost all tap water in the US is drinkable. The exceptions are generally noted and announced and temporary.


63

I live in Prague where the water is equally safe to drink and tastes well, however plenty of people still buy bottled water. The reasons are: Different flavors. Bottled water comes in a variety of tastes and levels of carbonation, which is obviously unavailable from the tap. As suggested by long-time resident @Relaxed, this is part of the German affinity ...


54

Tap water in MA is quite drinkable; I've lived here for over 30 years, drinking it. No funny colors or odors, either.


48

As a British person I can say in this instance I just splash my hands, or move them in and out of the water stream very quickly. I would do in the winter when it is very cold, too, even when both taps are present, because splashing quickly with too hot water is often preferable to ice cold water. Also try using a different sink, because water usually cools ...


44

If it is not possible to mix with cold water, I would suggest getting some toilet paper wet and use that (afrer cooling down) like wet nappies.


39

Yes, tap water in the US is regularly tested and drinkable except when explicitly noted. For example, here in Portland, Oregon we usually have a "boil alert" (i.e. boil your tap water before drinking it) about once a year for a couple days because a regular sample indicates possible E. Coli contamination. There usually isn't, but they get the warning out ...


37

No. Physical filters using pores with 0.2 µm (microfiltration) cannot remove heavy metal contamination (lead, mercury). This is possible with ion exchangers, distillation and nanofilters (see below). remove viruses. Most of them are too small and will easily pass through the filter. remove substances like salt and magnesium which make the water undrinkable....


35

https://www.swm.de/privatkunden/m-wasser/qualitaet.html This website belongs to the Stadtwerke Munich. They state that Alle Werte von M-Wasser liegen weit unter den gesetzlich vorgeschriebenen Grenzen. Dadurch eignet sich M-Wasser hervorragend als Trinkwasser und sogar ausgezeichnet zur Zubereitung von Babynahrung. Durch seine lebenswichtigen ...


31

Virtually all municipal water systems in the United States provide clean and safe drinking water. Water supplies are regulated by the government and must be tested regularly. Water safety problems are generally well publicized, often national news if they are significant, and emergency notices are issued if a rare temporary situation, such as a water main ...


29

I'm living in a high populated area (at least for NZ's standard) in Auckland, but the question goes for the whole country. Yes. Except in exceptional circumstances, NZ tapwater is universally safe to drink. Standards exist to ensure that major contaminating organisms such as Protozoa and Cryptosporidium are removed or reduced to safe levels. Auckland ...


27

To add to Thorsten's excellent and quite accurate answer: No, it takes quite a lot more than that to create perfectly safe water. For example, here's my Indian water purification system. I know it's not feasible for travellers, but I'm including it to illustrate just how much is actually needed to get really pure water: Some things to note about it: It ...


25

It is a requirement of the Health and Safey Executive that water is marked as "Not Drinking Water" unless it meets the requirements to be considered drinking water. Drinking water An adequate supply of high-quality drinking water, with an upward drinking jet or suitable cups, should be provided. Water should only be provided in refillable enclosed ...


25

I've lived in India for five years, and I believe it's better to err on the side of caution here. Why? It's important to remember that as a foreigner, your immune system is quite differently equipped compared to that of the locals. Indian ground water and tap water is often contaminated with various bacteria, other pathogens, as well as toxic chemicals ...


23

The other answerers have answered your question about whether it is safe. I'd like to address the issue of chlorinated water not being very pleasant to drink by explaining how to dechlorinate the chlorinated water. You can reduce that chloriney taste somewhat, mainly by aerating the water. I kept tropical fish for years and you can't use chlorinated water ...


23

I've lived in India for almost five years now, and I believe it's better to err on the side of caution here. For drinking water, stay away from all fountains, taps and the like. I would stick to this advice even in the airport and at hotels. Also use bottled water for brushing your teeth. Buy bottled water of a known brand. (Bisleri, Aquafina, Kinley.) It's ...


22

My understanding is that chlorine, in the concentrations found in drinking water, does not pose an acute health danger. There may be health risks associated with long-term exposure, and this is a more controversial topic, where the literature and expert opinions are mixed. Most main-stream information seems to suggest it's safe, but the skeptics claim a ...


21

Yes, but not everywhere. Below is an image of what the water fountains look like at the airport at the time of writing (07/2015): CDG water fountain, JoErNanO, Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Apparently, the fountains are used in other airports - but I found another mention of it in this video, which also attributes it to CDG. It is a side view, but it ...


21

Water regulations in Switzerland are very strict and most tap water is of impeccable quality. There is also a law which states that any fountain, which doesn't have regulated drinking water, has to be declared as such, so if you see a fountain with no sign on a village square, it's very likely safe to be drunk. This is most likely the reason why there is a ...


19

It's tough to make one general blanket statement about the water and sanitation system for an entire country with it being accurate everywhere in the country. Plugging in some places I've traveled gives similar results to what you and Jonik have noted...while it's not bad overall, it's not very precise, like for example, in Costa Rica, our travel guides said ...


19

Even though I do not recommend anyone to drink tap water in India and the 18 years of my life I was born and brought up in Delhi, I had no idea that you could drink tap water in other countries. Fortunately, I know much more now. Tap water in India is certainly filtered and chlorinated and all the other things one would expect in any other country. It is ...


19

Delhi has a few water ATMs which dispense potable water at a really cheap price(~ 0.07$/liter). Although you have mentioned that you don't want to purchase water bottles, I'd like to mention that water bottles are relatively cheaper (not more than ~ 0.30$/liter ) in India. If you are traveling really cheap, don't hesitate to knock on a roadside house door ...


18

I was advised by both locals and colleagues who'd travelled to India to even be careful which bottled water you drink, as some (such as refilled glass bottles provided in hotel rooms) are filled from tap water. The rule of thumb I was given was to stick to brewery brands, as most have related bottled water brands. These have filtration and other sterilising ...


18

No, tap water is usually not safe to drink in India. Households commonly buy large, office cooler type bottles of drinking water or have in-house filtration systems. So if it's a normal tap, then don't drink from it. The exception is if the tap has a cooling or a filtration unit next to it. (I can't find a free image for this to include here.) These could ...


18

Short answer - you'll need to ask the property to be sure. All the mains tap water will be fine to drink everywhere in the UK and Ireland. However... Some hostels may have a tank which feeds some of their taps, so you may find that the taps in the kitchen are mains-fed and fine, but the ones in bathrooms (for an example) could be fed via the tank, and may ...


17

No, you just got lucky. Virtually everywhere in the world, tap water is fine when it leaves the processing plant, the problem is what happens between the processing plant and the tap you drink it from. If there's a leaky water pipe with another leaky sewage pipe dripping on to it, you're screwed. This is also why flooding and heavy rains often make tap ...


17

The Netherlands certainly doesn't have that many public taps as other countries. Maybe also because the regular tap water is of very good quality. But the recent years more and more taps are placed. Mostly to advertise against bottled water, and help people who use own (recycled) bottles. I know of two websites / apps which have a map of taps: ...


17

First off, except in the case of short-term disasters, tap water is safe to drink everywhere in the United States. In the US, the Environmental Protection Agency regulates tap water quality. The Food and Drug Administration regulates bottled water as a food. EPA standards are stricter than FDA standards. For bottled water products that are bottled and sold ...


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