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93

Taiwan's policy, related to trash, is that you are expected to take your trash home and dispose of it properly, that is, using the correct bin for separate collection of different types of trash. This is part of a rather comprehensive policy on how to process trash, after, years ago, Taipei's streets were lined with trash and very stinky. A podcast called "...


12

Short answer: Fuxing and Shuttle are two specific service classes on the Taiwan Railways. They refer to semi-express and local trains respectively. The numbers are TrainCode, which identify the train services. There are 2-6 trains per hours between Keelung and Taipei on weekdays, with more trains during the peak hours. The last train departs from Keelung at ...


9

There are a couple businesses within Taiwan Taoyuan International Airport that provide printing / photocopying service. 7-eleven / ibon Kiosk in Terminal 1 The 7-eleven in Terminal 1 (B1) has two ibon Kiosks, a self-service machine that supports printing and scanning of documents (instructions here): You can print out any documents or pictures saved in ...


7

For visits of under 30 days, you can now apply online. Vietnam provides e-visas to citizens of 80 countries, Australia being one of them, if you travel by air. You simply apply online and pay a fee of 25 USD. It takes around 3 working days to be processed, and you can then download and print it to enter/exit the country.


6

As a US citizen you do not require a visa to enter Taiwan. I have done exactly what you're planning multiple times (most recently last year) and had no issues passing through immigration in either direction. If the immigration staff ask, just explain to them that you are in transit, and show them your connecting boarding pass. Presuming you are on a ...


6

There's nothing really special from a customs perspective about Ti-6Al-4V. The skin of the airplane he flies in is made out of the stuff. But the monetary value of what he brings in could be a customs issue. This stuff isn't necessarily cheap, so depending on how much he brings in, there might be a customs duty owed. The personal duty-free exemption is 20,...


6

Summary: Not from a legal/policy perspective, as the restriction only applies to Mainland Chinese residents. It is difficult to gauge how that affects the ferry you are planning to take though (given there will be less tourist traffic). The BBC article the OP linked contains a link to a notice by the Ministry of Culture and Tourism of the PRC. It reads: ...


5

An "entry visa" is just a visa which permits you to travel to the named countries. It is written this way to distuingish it from the "exit visa", which is a document that a few countries still use, which is required for a person to leave those countries.


5

In my (limited) tourist experience, unless you want to ride a C-bike in Kaohsiung, you can stick with the Easycard bought at Taoyuan airport's MRT station for all of your (public, local) transportation needs. There are several stored value cards available from different providers around the country, but the most important one are Taipei Easycard and ...


5

Looking at the TRTC website's ticketing page there does appear to be a one-day unlimited ticket available for NT$150: You can choose when to activate the pass. Once activated by scanning at the gates, it is valid for unlimited travel on the Taipei Metro until end of service on the same day. Valid for one passenger at a time only. So it looks like this ...


5

This website (which is the first entry on my Google search with the keyword 台灣派出所營地 (Taiwan Police Station Campsite), not affiliated) is a list of campsites in Taiwan, and lists two entries with the tag "police station". One is in Dulan, Taitung as the OP mentioned, and one is in Changbin Township, Taitung. The listing is unfortunately in Chinese only. ...


5

Tips for those who want to go to Matsu Islands (Nangan) for a few days to continue to Taiwan or return to China afterward. It is currently (11/2019) possible to travel to Nangan from Fuzhou Mawei. There is (usually!) one boat per day that leaves at 9:15 am, you have to be at the terminal ferry before 8:30 am to complete the formalities. Finding the new ...


5

I found this twelve-year-old post on a Lonely Planet forum: Weekly ferry services operate between the Taiwanese ports of Keelung and Kaohsiung, and the southern Japanese-island of Okinawa. The ferries arrive in and depart from Naha, the capital of Okinawa, often stopping at the Miyako and Ishigaki Islands en route. Fares for the 20-hour journey ...


5

That looks like it should be the cost for being stuck in traffic. It's not specific to the airport, just a common way taxi fares work to balance distance and time. From this government site (mirror) (numbers appear to be out of date, but it illustrates the general idea): (2) Prolonged metering: It’s NT$5 for every 100 seconds for slow-moving taxis at ...


5

Yes, it does. Though: The waiting time refers to the time the taxi spent waiting (or moving very slowly) in traffic and lights (after the flag is down), but not the time it wait for the passengers to turn up before the flag is down, and It doesn't cost much as compared to how much the taxi charge when it moves. The department of transport, Taoyuan City ...


4

Since your Japanese visa is expired by less than 10 years, you can use it and the TAC to visit Taiwan Per TIMATIC, the database used by airlines (if check-in staff tries to deny you boarding, point to this): Visa required, except for Nationals of India with a printed Travel Authorization Certificate for a maximum stay of 14 days. The Travel ...


4

Am I wrong in assuming they have the special offers in both directions? Yes and no. Technically, yes, you are wrong to just assume it, since they can very well sell special fares in only one direction if they wish. However, typically they will sell them in both directions, as is the case here. The full details of which flights are eligible to the discounted ...


4

As you're talking about 8 hours, this might be a close call. But Taoyuan airport (which I assume you will transfer at) is one of the few airports worldwide that offer a free city tour when you have a long transfer. As a US citizen you're visa exempt so this tour applies to you. You can find more information, the planning and a FAQ about it here: https://eng....


4

At a bank. There are at least two in the airport. Bank of Taiwan is government owned and gives a fair exchange rate, so if you are going to the airport, no need to stop by a bank elsewhere on the way.


4

According to TripAdvisor, the 7-11 convenience store has printers where you can print, scan and fax. I can't really confirm based on their website (in English, there is a Taiwan website too) because it's not explicit on there but there is a phone number to the terminal where the store is located that you probably can call to be sure.


3

There is public transport available, as you mentioned. Bus route 7211 goes direct from central Chiayi and the TRA station to the HSR station in roughly 20-30 minutes - I really don't know why Google Maps is reporting this as a journey time of nearly 2 hours. There was also previously the 7212 route, but it looks like that's been withdrawn since the last time ...


3

There was no problem with this. Of course I was asked to show my ticket to Hong Kong when I was checking in in the US, as Michael Hampton points out, and also to show my ticket to the US as well as hotel reservations in Taiwan before boarding to my flight to Taiwan in Hong Kong.


3

Travelling from Taipei to Chiayi, and then directly to Alishan National Park is already a very long journey, the 7329 bus journey from Chiayi HSR to Alishan is over 2 hours in itself. Adding Fenqihu into the trip will definitely be stretching your time significantly - you will be spending more time travelling than standing still, although the Forest Railway ...


3

I suspect you're correct; Taoyuan station to Taipei station is 52 TWD by local train, or about US$1.60. There is also the recently opened Taoyuan MRT Subway service via the airport, but this doesn't cover the old Taoyuan station (only the new HSR one) and is much pricier at 160 TWD.


3

The government advice is a little confusing. Your IDP is all that is required when entering as a tourist for a visit of 30 days or less. I've picked up cars at the airport, but I've also found it's better value if you are staying in Taipei on your first night, to rent in the city and have a vehicle delivered to your hotel in the morning. Driving in Taiwan ...


3

I ended up traveling on local trains around Taipei, New Taipei City, and northern Yilan County during the day on December 27, 28, 29, and January 5. I avoided normal rush-hour times on all of these days. I was almost always able to get a seat on the trains. Even if one wasn't available when I stepped on, it would become available later. They are not always ...


3

The customs and passport control at Taipei Port is all in the same building in the port (which also houses the ticket office). We were there today, travelling with CSF. You just turn up there (here's the plus code of the front door - 592R+55 Taipei, Taiwan), pick your tickets up if necessary and pass through security. A bus then shuttles you to the ferry ...


3

There's a Taipei Port to Pingtan ferry. We took it earlier today at 9am. It leaves from the port to the west of Taipei (rather than the old Keelung port to the north). Buying tickets: we asked a Chinese friend to book, although I've heard you can book through their central Taipei office. It also looked like you can buy at the terminal. Travel to port: we ...


3

No. According to the official website of Yehliu Geopark, the travel time is more like two hours (translation mine): 野柳←→淡水 淡水或基隆客運:班距約30分,車程約2小時。 Yehliu <-> Tamsui Tamshui Bus Company, Ltd. or Keelung Bus Company, Ltd.: Service runs roughly every 30 mins, [and the] travel time [is] roughly 2 hours. (Interestingly the travel time is omitted in the ...


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