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55

We can't help you in whether it's worth your time. That is a decision up to you. What we can do is answering the "Why is the Vasa Museum in Stockholm so Popular?" question. It's not a "how or how not to build ship", there are grand maritime museums for that around the world. The Vasa is a largely intact five hundred year old warship and not only a plain ...


32

As mentioned before, it is a great museum because this is probably the only original ship left from this time. The other "old" sailships/warships you can view in other museums are either much younger, or rebuilds/replicas based on incomplete wrecks or plans. I also liked the fact that the VASA-museum is dedicated to this one ship and it's history only and ...


25

According to the organizers, 'there is no VAT return for private citizens'. This is a conclusive answer. VAT refunds are intended for things which will be exported from a country. For example, if you were to make a large jewelry purchase to bring home, the jeweler would be able to give you documentation to claim a refund. Since you aren't "exporting" the ...


17

https://www.gatwickairport.com/at-the-airport/flying-in/flight-connections/ International to international flight connections If you’re arriving at Gatwick from an international flight, are connecting on to another international destination you have some choices to make depending on your circumstances: If your hold bags are through ...


14

Credit and debit cards are ubiquitous in Scandinavia. You should have no trouble using a Visa card. Before you travel, you could apply for a credit card that has zero foreign transactions fee. You can also take out money from an ATM, like almost anywhere else in the world. Some banks' ATM cards refund ATM fees. Purchases in a foreign currency are no ...


13

You can apply for a UK visa from any location where there is a visa application centre (VAC), it does not have to be from your country of residence, so yes, you can apply from Sweden. A Standard Visitor visa costs £93 and typically takes up to 3 weeks to process (it can take longer in some cases) https://www.gov.uk/standard-visitor-visa It should be ...


11

The airport is set to open 22 December 2019. The new or radically rebuilt airport is called Scandinavian Mountains Airport, which is rather unspecific as it will not be the only airport in the Scandinavian Mountains and the mountain range stretches 1700 km.


9

How were they connected? Generally they were not. There were car ferries, but they were slowish and mostly used as part of long-distance journeys rather than just between Copenhagen and Malmö. The last several decades they didn't connect anywhere near the city centers either. Either you would drive to Dragør (outside Copenhagen) for a ferry to Limhamn, or ...


9

I suppose you have both flights on the same ticket. In that case: your luggage will be checked through to your final destination you should get boarding passes for both flights in Tampa you will not need to go through passport control, reclaim your bags, or go through customs in Gatwick you may have to go through security, though you will then proceed ...


8

I called the airline and they said an authorization is not necessary, but recommended. My question was because some countries do require an authorization from parents, because of child traffic. So I will probably write a letter and have it notarized, just in case. Better safe than sorry.


8

Like all great museums, the Vasa Museum is an experience more than just a couple of rooms with a lot of old stuff. It is true that the number of exhibits and topics are very limited, but that's a strength, not a weakness - it's an excellently curated collection with a narrow theme, a very strong primary exhibit (the ship itself, which is extremely impressive ...


8

Sweden really is cashless, I don't even have a wallet - I pay with my watch or phone - and I only have an SL Access Card (soon you can have your monthly tickets iny our phone) and house keys (because I have a strange door on which smart locks don't fit) besides the phone and watch. All places that sell SL Access Cards accept credit/debit cards. Almost all ...


7

Adding to the previous answers, the Vasa museum is to me a metaphor on how not to run a project in general. We certainly learned in 333 years how to avoid building a boat that will capsize, but we keep failing at applying the learning to other projects. While visiting the Vasa museum, friends of mine from Berlin couldn't help drawing parallels with the ...


6

Just an addition to Henning's answer, but too long for just a comment: It is perhaps worth noticing that before the Øresund bridge was built, all rail and most road traffic from Copenhagen and Zealand to Sweden (in general) used the ferry connection between Helsingør and Helsingborg, about 50km north of Copenhagen. This traffic did not go through Malmö at ...


6

As was suggested above, you should consider getting a credit card that does not have a surcharge for foreign transactions. Generally speaking, you should have no trouble using your cards in Sweden and Denmark. There are only two things you should be aware of. One is that debit networks are not 100% interoperable with U.S. networks. So your debit card might ...


6

There seems to be a bit of confusion here. Flygbussarna is a bus service to and from airports in Sweden. From Arlanda airport they operate three routes. They all pick up passengers at three stops at the airport and then take the E4 motorway south, after which they separate. Each route has its own stops in and around central Stockholm. The most used line is ...


6

I couldn't find a reference on the airport's own web site, but from this page The terminal at Kiruna Airport is open during the day. The terminal opens about an hour before the first flight departure and close about 30 minutes after the last flight arrival. This means that the terminal is closed during the night. Kiruna Airport doesn’t offer any ...


5

I have to completely agree w/user1202136. The story itself is utterly fascinating. Ever have a manager or boss that was so cocksure of themselves that they created requirements and more requirements that eventually "sank" the project? This is that story writ large on the global stage. The icing on the cake is that the evidence for this story is nearly 100% ...


5

The other answers have covered the specifics but the big picture is that it doesn't really matter. As (presumably) a US citizen, you don't need a visa to visit or transit in the UK so, depending on whether your bags are checked through (ask when you check them in), you either follow the signs to connecting flights or to baggage claim. If you need to go ...


4

The relevant rule is article 6.1 of the Schengen Borders Code: For intended stays on the territory of the Member States of a duration of no more than 90 days in any 180-day period, which entails considering the 180-day period preceding each day of stay, the entry conditions for third-country nationals shall be the following: (a) they are in ...


4

The VAT location for the conference is Sweden, so this is in itself an "inner-Swedish" type of invoice (like buying a cinema ticket when you are in Sweden). (As opposed to, say, buying Swedish goods to be delivered outside Sweden - then the invoice would be of "export" type and would usually become your duty to pay your country's VAT on importing goods). ...


4

Not necessarily. The onus is on him, as the visitor, to show he has funds to support himself. So - he'll have to show proof of the invite - that's fine, you're able to help with that. Then he'll have to show funds. If he's staying at yours, then at least he won't need as much as won't have to pay for accommodation. But as long as he satisfies immigration ...


4

Bring more than one card. Especially in Sweden a lot of people never use cash but if you only have one card and lose it you have a problem, especially as a tourist. So get a second card and leave it in your luggage while your primary card is in our wallet or similar.


4

I would get a card from one of the newer "Fintech" providers that are competing on cost in the foreign payments market. They tend to have low fees, and they are also transparent on any extra they are charging on top of the mid-market exchange rate. That's a notional fair rate where you could convert money from one currency into another and immediately back ...


4

You will only be deported to a country that the deporters know will accept you. This will be the country you came from only if they know that you have permission to return there. You may sometimes ask to be deported to a specific country If You can demonstrate you have permission to enter, but in case of any doubt most countries will deport you to your ...


4

Both Denmark and Sweden are in the Schengen area, so crossing the border is not leaving and re-entering Schengen. There will be no problem at all going back to Denmark. There may be a problem going to Sweden. If you have a visa for the Schengen states, you can make minor adjustments to your travel plans after the visa is granted. This includes crossing ...


4

Yes, I bought an SL Access card+travelcard from a manned metro gate with a credit card in February 2019. In May 2018 I bought one with value from the SL Center with a credit card. There is also plenty of retailers that sells SL Access cards and offer topups, probably all of them accept credit cards, at least Pressbyrån does. Check the map here: https://sl....


4

What happened for us was this: No information about what hotel we'd get before takeoff. We found a guy at the airport holding a sign with the charter company's logo on it. He had a list of hotel rooms in different hotels and assigned us a room on the spot. We went to the hotel and the receptionist asked for the voucher. I sent it to the hotel by email as ...


3

Native swede from Stockholm here. Supposedly it is because very few ships from the 17th century are so well-preserved. For many decades the museum was just the ship itself, nothing else. You'd probably have to be quite a bit of a nautical nerd to find that alone interesting for more than 10 minutes. But in the late 80s/early 90s they built a proper museum ...


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