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48

Normally she would enter on a 90 days tourist visa, as we don't yet have a long term family reunification visa. Your wife will never get a long-term family reunification visa because such visas are not issued to beneficiaries of the free movement directive. As a beneficiary from a so-called "Annex II" country (that is, a country whose citizens do not need ...


11

As a visitor to the UK, you are (almost) always admitted for 6 months, regardless of the length of stay which you apply for, or state at the border. However, it is usually a bad idea to drastically extend your stay beyond what you originally asked for. On future application for visits, you could face denial or tough questioning, which is perhaps why you're ...


8

The US embassy in Spain has a page that you should read. It says in part: If you have a valid visa or ESTA and believe, after reading the proclamation and the updated information in the FAQs, that you qualify for an exception, please send an email to MadridNIE@state.gov Due to the large volume of inquiries, we will only respond to those who have imminent ...


5

Your short-stay Schengen visa (C-Visa) allows you to stay in the Schengen Area based on the 90/180 days rule and will be checked upon entry and exit of the Schengen Area. Entry could be refused should they determine that you have overstayed. A National visa (D-Visa) for a specific country (such as Italy) would be needed to stay longer. Under what ...


5

Obtaining a visitor visa will likely be problematic. It is possible, however. Furthermore, it is not forbidden to adjust from visitor status to permanent resident status, but it is also problematic to do so. In the second case, the problem lies not in the switch itself, but in the conditions for entering as a visitor. If you enter the US with the ...


5

As the spouse of a US citizen, you are exempt from the bans for people who have been in certain countries in the last 14 days (e.g. the one on the Schengen Area, which you would otherwise be subject to as you are in Spain). So you can enter the US by air if you would normally be able to. Like any other foreigner entering the US as a visitor, you can still be ...


4

US immigration is weird. You are technically allowed to fly to the US on the Visa Waiver Program, get married and fly out. (Visa Waiver Program or VWP is the correct name for what is usually called "coming on an ESTA".) If you get married to a US citizen while in the US on VWP, then you are allowed to file for 'adjustment of status' to become a ...


3

As @phoog correctly notes, US immigration law contains many non-obvious and unexpected subtleties. As he points out, making the wrong choice now can have lifelong bad consequences. For example, while you could try to visit, visiting might prove disastrous for your future immigration possibilities if the consular officer reviewing your visa application, or ...


3

A simple solution would be that you bought a ticket for flying from Germany that departed the from same part restricted area your wife is arriving to. That way, you would be able to join her there. Needing to buy an useless ticket seems wrong on many fronts, but would be relatively easy solution. You would need to ensure it doesn't depart from a different ...


3

This answer expands on points already made briefly in comments on your question. There is no inherent problem with using the visa twice in the same year, but there are a couple of problems with the proposed travel pattern. The first problem is that your wife may appear to be living in the UK and visiting China rather than the other way round. According to ...


3

Based on the present situation (effective immediately until after Easter), non EU Citizens¹, that do not have a valid residence permit (or a D-Visa to start a residence), will not be permitted to enter Germany and any traveler that may arrive that does not fullfill these conditions will be sent back. Assume therefore, that visa free citizens and ...


3

There are still a lot of unknowns at this stage, so it is quite difficult to answer with any degree of certainty. I expect you would need to be able to prove to someone (probably the airline, and then again CBP upon arrival in the US) that you are the spouse of a US citizen. Make sure you have a copy of your marriage certificate or other similar document, ...


3

Now that we are in the brexit transition period, is it the case she can still apply in this capacity? Yes. The withdrawal agreement specifies that EU law still applies in the UK and to the UK until the end of the transition period. This means that citizens of the UK are still treated as EU citizens for the purpose of EU law, including the free movement ...


2

Would she be required to get a seperate visa to enter France? Yes. The UK and France are separate territories for the purpose of immigration control, and they have different visa exemption lists. She only needs a visa, though, if her passport is from a so-called "Annex I" country. If she has an "Annex II" passport, she does not need a visa for the ...


1

Since there is no posted answer espousing the view that "a UK citizen visiting the Netherlands for a holiday is 'exercising their EU rights of free movement,'" I will post one. Obviously that is true only while the UK continues to participate in the EU's freedom of movement scheme, which currently seems like it will be until the end of this year. ...


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