34

I'm afraid you can stop hoping, because with current airplane technology, direct flights between East or Southeast Asia and South America are effectively impossible. The maximum practical range of today's best planes hovers around 8,000 nautical miles. The longest flight ever flown commercially anywhere was Singapore Airlines' Singapore-Newark service at ...


31

Looks like Wat Chaiwatthanaram in Ayutthaya, Thailand, north of Bangkok: (courtesy Justin Vidano via Wikimedia) While the tubular central Khmer-style prang does indeed look a bit like Angkor Wat, the red brick is distinctively different and the tilted chedi dome (right in the original, far left in the photo above) and the brick terraces all around are ...


17

The article Don’t Touch My Child! Lessons from Asia by Cordelia Newlin de Rojas at InCultureParent.com article may be of interest. I can’t speak for all Asian cultures but in Singapore and Thailand, people love kids. And I am talking everyone. Age and gender simply don’t factor in. At first, I admittedly found it a little disconcerting how so many people ...


17

It's easy, use the hose! while you're sitting on the toilet seat, direct the hose to your private area (do not insert it there, of course), press and get yourself cleaned. This answer explains how to use the hose.


15

Is going via Australia or New Zealand not an option? Qantas 27 runs direct from Sydney to Santiago, Chile every other day, while LAN Chile 800 runs the same route daily with an intermediate stop in Auckland, NZ. There's also Air New Zealand 30 that flies from Auckland to Buenos Aires, Argentina, but it's Fri-Sun-Tues only.


14

Take a look at http://www.claudiocorallo.com/ His story is amazing, and he is probably one of the best cacao producers in the world. They do the whole growing of cacao to sell and they produce their own chocolate also. I know of a friend that went to Claudios farm in S. Tome e Principe and they have a guided tour where they explain the whole process of ...


11

The answer is going to depend on your exact itinerary, but my sneaky suspicion is that hubbing out of Kuala Lumpur and flying Air Asia everywhere would be the cheapest way to do it. Not only is Air Asia cheap and ubiquitous, but the passenger taxes & charges at KUL are noticeably lower than in SIN. That said, Kuala Lumpur's LCC terminal is a bit of a ...


9

How often do cameras get stolen? Every. Single. Day. You should always guard your camera, and any other valuables, as if they were expensive, and could walk off at any time because, well, they are expensive, and could walk off at any time. Certainly the degree to which you guard your belongings can be very region-dependent, but will generally be a lot more ...


9

This information is correct. Same if you apply for one in Hong Kong. To translate what this is: You need to own real estate in China OR be married to a Chinese person OR have received two single-entry visas before AND you have to be able to prove either of those. If you cannot, you will receive a single-entry visa to China only. Once you've used that, you ...


9

The best way to get cell phone service throughout Southeast Asia is to buy a SIM card in each country; probably at the airport when you land. You can buy a SIM at most international airports with minimal wait. Less than $20.00 US will usually last you for a week (voice, data, SMS, and tethering). The greatest overhead will be for them to potentially copy ...


8

Ok, Since I travel to Sabah a lot, here is my take on your plan. Fly from KL to KK and make that your start/end point. Explore KK Town Check out the islands (Manukan and Sapi which are only 15 minutes from town) Explore Kinabalu National Park (2 hrs away from KK) Fly KK to Sandakan (45 mins) Explore Sandakan, filled with Eco Tourism. Places like Sepilok ...


8

If you are really on the lookout for cacao and chocolate from start to finish, Chuao in Venezuela is the place to go. They do not have an official 'assist on the plantation' arrangement, but local life revolves around the process, and you will certainly be able to see every part of it, and taste the products at various stages. In my opinion, the BEST ...


8

I used to live in Singapore and travel all of these countries (except Laos) extensively. You can go into and out of Thailand multiple times - each time getting a 30 day visa with no problems. Getting a Cambodia e-visa online is a breeze and worked well for us when we entered the country by bus at the Vietnam/Cambodian border between Ho Chi Minh City and ...


8

Since you consider Myanmar difficult, the best route would be: Malaysia, Thailand, Laos, China. There, avoiding Tibet and Qinghai completely, going through Yunnan, Chengdu, Xi'an, Lanzhou, Urumuqi, Kashgar and from there into Pakistan. The interesting part here is that you basically travel along the silk road, which is very interesting. I did that 2 years ...


8

The bad news is that there's no sensible pan-Southeast Asian solution nor one in sight. There are no operators that cover the whole region, or even more than a country or two, and thanks to nationalistic telecoms policies and the lack of something like the EU cracking heads, this is unlikely to change anytime soon. The good news is that prepaid SIMs are ...


8

Usually questions like these get closed as subjective, but in KL's case I think there's a pretty objective answer: The Petronas Towers! (courtesy me) Especially at night... (courtesy Someformofhuman, Wikimedia Commons) Sure, there are taller skyscrapers these days, but (IMHO) few are prettier, and nothing else in KL that you can cover in an hour comes ...


8

None. I have visited all those countries and I wasn't asked about insurance by any country (we have free medical care back in my home country but I think that's irrelevant). A note about your credit card's insurance: if you plan to use it, just make sure you are eligible for it before leaving the country. In most cases, you have to buy the ticket using that ...


8

No, you're not going to find anything cost-competitive with LCCs, meaning a few hundred dollars. (That would barely get you from Sydney to Brisbane.) You can count the number of SE Asia to Australia cruises per year on your fingers, and both markets consider the other exotic and desirable, so there's plenty of demand as well. Random sample: Sydney to ...


7

For Singapore, camping is limited to certain places: Changi Beach Park - From Carpark 1 to Carpark 4 and Carpark 6 to Carpark 7) East Coast Park - Area D and Area G Pasir Ris Park - Area 1 and Area 3 West Coast Park - Area 3 For all the places above, a camping permit is required, however you can apply for it easily online at the AXS website. The maximum ...


7

Three of the four are fairly large regions ... For Thailand, though: The short (and useless) andswer is: Yes, free camping is permitted in Thailand. The longer answer is: Where, what's your idea of camping, and whose permission? If you're not too hung up on official permission, then most places you'd want to camp are fine: you won't be bothering anyone ...


7

According to laos-guide-999.com: If you don't have photos you will be asked to pay a small fee (few dollars) for scanning your photograph from your passport, and placing it onto your visa application form. Another opinion from wikitravel: passport photo is/may be required (although you may be able to pay a US$1 "fee" to have this requirement waived) -...


6

Thailand: visa-free for 30 days stay when arriving by air, but only 15 days at ground crossings for most nationalities (as of Oct 2013, 30 days at ground crossings for G7 countries: USA, Japan, France, Germany, Italy, UK and Canada). No restrictions on number of entries. If planning to stay longer, get a tourist visa at a Thai consulate (at home or in ...


6

You can get visas at the border (on arrival) for all of those countries except Vietnam. (Technically, Vietnam does have an embryonic visa-on-arrival service, but you have to apply for it in advance online and it can only be used if you fly into Hanoi or HCMC, so it's useless for most backpackers.) That said, getting a Vietnamese visa in Bangkok, Vientiane ...


6

I think you were disappointed because the most famous Lao dishes have become popular in Thailand and a lot of the food you find in Laos without a local to help isn't really Lao food but Thai, Vietnamese, Chinese, and French food. The most famous Lao dishes have to be larb and green papaya salad. I never saw these on offer in non-touristy Surat Thani in ...


5

Despite the country, sometimes allergies are not taken seriously by healthy people, they just can not imagine that the food they all like is something that could cause harm to other people! so, weird questions and reactions towards this kind of allergy are common. I myself can not eat shrimps and some other sea food, and most people like shrimps so they ...


5

The Bhutanese recognize dietary needs very well, as a large portion of the population have specific dietary needs (vegetarianism is largely observed). However I also have oral allergy syndrome and I find that it's not a largely understood form of allergies. Depending on your severity, but most of their food is quite simple (limited in ingredients, heavier on ...


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