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It's a sign of respect. A bit like using both hands to shake yours. (Source: I lived in Africa for something like 7 years.) I personally found this more common in West Africa than East Africa. Edit: Perhaps as clarification, the right elbow typically is held with the left hand, as if to support the right arm. But, I've also often seen 'just' touching the ...


49

As MastaBaba said, it's a sign of respect. As an Ethiopian, most of us were taught as children to hold our hand (anywhere on the forearm) when greeting elders (basically anyone older). It is considered rude to shake hands without holding one's arm, and in most cases the person (elder) will be offended. Sometimes, the person may also look down during the ...


44

It is more like air kissing than cheek kissing here in South America and pretty much all over Central America too. You basically put your cheek against the one you are greeting and kiss. Only one kiss and we usually go for the left side, meaning each one has their head to the left of the other with the right cheeks touching. In social situations, even if ...


25

I am French and I never thought of which cheek should be first kissed! I don't think there is a definite rule. The protocol I identified is: first protagonist tends his or her cheek (left or right) second protagonist adapts and tends the same cheek. if it fails, both smile or laugh and the procedure starts again As for the number of kisses, when people don'...


15

Cheek kissing - Wikipedia and How to air kiss - Wikihow gives conventions about kissing in diffrent countries, precising it's often the right cheek first. ("Air" kiss because your lips don't actually go on the cheek, it's more cheek-on-cheek and you make the noise with your lips.) Only for France, combiendebises.com gives stats for each department about the ...


15

Having lived in Uganda Africa for almost 8 years I think I can answer your question. Here in Uganda its a sign of respect. I often place my hand on my elbow when shaking the hands of the elderly because I acknowledge their old age and their knowledge. It means they acknowledge you and respect you. Like @Kidus answered its considered rude to not place your ...


12

I spent some months in Southern India last year and compared with some other parts of the world it was indeed a bit harder to meet other travellers. I haven't been to the North of the country yet but I assume it is similar. Some of the best places to meet people is in your dorm room or the hostel kitchen. India doesn't really have that many hostels or a ...


11

Everyone in Japan has a "name card" -- a business card -- with plenty of contact information. In most situations, an exchange of name cards is a fundamental part of the meeting ritual. If you are going to spend any time in Japan, you need to learn the fine points of the greeting ritual (especially how to properly respect the name card). Granted, the name ...


10

For classical tourism locations, you might be having troubles since people of that age do not really like to travel to temples and other places that tourists like. Younger Japanese people prefer to go abroad (Korea, Hong Kong, Thailand) since this is often cheaper than traveling in Hong Kong. And since they have to go to Japanese temples and museums with ...


9

I've moved countries a lot, doing contracts. One of the finest resources that I've found is meetup.com You sign up, give your city, and your interests, and it starts suggesting social groups and events for you! I've used it to meet people and try new things when I lived in Vancouver, and now here in Melbourne, Australia. We can't tell you what to do or ...


9

In the countries of the Levant (especially Lebanon, Syria, Jordan), cheek kissing is quite common. Depending on the situation, it might not be appropriate to cheek-kiss a member of the opposite sex. However, in some areas such as the coastal part of Syria and most of Lebanon, or in case you're close friends or relatives, it's also common to cheek-kiss a ...


8

After quite some searching, the best I can provide is a link on gumtree which shows classified ads for soccer in Dublin. Several of them are trying to form teams or need extra players, and I'm sure would be happy to have a visitor join in for a game!


8

Greetings have in fact been studied extensively by anthropologists and even by ethologists. For example, Irenäus Eibl-Eibesfeldt describes many of them in some of his books. Not much practical advice but truly surprising stuff. For example, spitting on the palm of your hand and rubbing it on the other person's face, or turning around and bending forward to ...


8

Unfortunately, this is not easy to answer, and highly dependent on the country. As discussed here for example in the context of young people for Japan. You will have to specify what type of people you want to meet and in which country you are to get a good answer with concrete points to follow on this. Some general pointers that will drastically improve ...


7

When doing business in Europe (Netherlands, UK, Belgium, Germany, French, Sweden, Denmark) I have always used handshakes. It allows you physical contact without invading their personal space. By making physical contact you give people a signal that you trust them. I have always felt kisses were to much up close, and could be awkward. Meeting with friends is ...


7

Just go with the flow - make sure you (and your wife) are self sufficient, so if a plan someone else is managing goes wrong, you now you two can still have fun. This can take a lot of the worry out of organised events. Alternatively, just work to a couple of meeting points through the day, say lunch and dinner, and do your own thing until then, just meeting ...


6

In addition to uncovery's answer which I wholeheartedly agree with, beaches are a great choice too. Part-time staff in bars and restaurants often have a day off on a weekday, and they are generally younger, so even during the week you should be able to find some people to talk to. As an archipelago, there are a lot of beaches. Find one that has easy access ...


6

I started as a comment but it grew too big. The answer is everyone's experience is different. In my job I met a lot of people who relocated, sometimes from very far, to my city and each adapted differently. The vicious cycle is, if you feel down you lack energy, but the best way to beat it is to keep busy...which require energy. It's tough, but there's hope ...


6

European Strategy As others have rightfully pointed out: there is no unique European greeting custom. Consequently there is no universally acknowledged strategy to avoid awkward situations. I however agree with my fellow travellers here: shake hands with strangers and with people to whom you are not close. Physical contact is strongly linked to intimacy ...


6

I think it is the respectful way of shaking hands. I assume this from reading The No 1 Ladies Detective Agency books (set in Botswana) where the main character refers to this as the proper way of shaking hands. A foreigner who shows respect by shaking hands this way goes up in the character’s estimation.


5

I lived in UB for a year and have visited on and off for the last 10 years. Its VERY easy to meet people in Mongolia. But please note about 50% of the population now lives in UB. That said, in the summer time (very short period!) everyone likes to spend time in the country side. So there is much enjoying, relaxing etc. In my experience traveling around ...


5

I have had a lot of looking at sites like this (Traveller Century Club, Most Traveled People, etc), and while there's a US Centric one (The All Fifty States Club), I've never seen a European one. Perhaps it's time to start one? :) Of course, the biggest problem you'll have is - what counts as a visit? This blog post has a great description of the argument ...


5

Just as another place where it is done, this is the standard way of shaking hands in the sport of Taekwondo. See this page for example: Shaking Hands A Taekwon-Do handshake is always given with two hands. With the right hand extended, place the left hand palm down under the right elbow. This is a gesture of respect and should be used at all times, ...


4

AirBaltic has a "Seat Buddy" program where they let people choose to sit with other passengers with similar moods / interests. Arguably, Airtroductions has tried to get dating in flight happening, but it's dubious as to whether they ever properly got "off the ground". Planely lets you reach out to other passengers on your flight too (although they also ...


4

I may be missing something obvious, but why not just ask them? I'm even inclined to suspect that, if they didn't share their contact details when you parted ways, they aren't necessarily that keen on staying in touch... Also, Facebook isn't that popular in Japan, although it has gone a long way in closing the gap with local alternative Mixi in the last ...


4

Though your question doesn't contain sufficient information but what I can understand you want to travel from Delhi -> Agra -> Rajasthan -> Western (Mumbai/khandala/Pune/Goa) -> to Eastern (Calcutta). Yes you are right, its very easy to meet people in India but to meet right people is bit difficult sometimes. You will be flooded with tourist guides at ...


3

It's always easier to meet other travellers whilst travelling. Locals going out in their home environment usually go with their friends and aren't really interested or 'open' to be joined by a stranger since it requires extra effort. That said the best places are pubs or bars with share tables. I am German and don't think it's too hard to meet Germans in a ...


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