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25

I don't know about Sicily specifically but in most of Italy this would not be much of a problem. Italians are big on fruits, vegetables, meat & fish. Of course they are even bigger on pasta and pizza :-). A typical Italian restaurant menu has multiple sections: antipasti (appetizers), primi (lots of pastas), secondi (generally meats, fish), contorni or ...


13

It is quite typical in Italy to have meat and carbohydrates as separate courses. For example, one of the primi piatti (often pasta) and then one of the secondi piatti (often meat or fish without many sides). It is very normal to have one or the other rather than both, maybe with an antipasto or a dessert. (http://www.taste-of-italy.com/2014/12/antipasto-...


11

Sicilian here. Consider it basically a non-issue. In Catania and Palermo there are even a few "Keto-Inspired" restaurants where you can require which caloric intake you're going for, but for the most part I can't think of any restaurant/tavern/pub that isn't serving beef/meat with salad. Actually, I think the opposite is way more uncommon.


9

I have asked the Gruppo Guide Etna Sud, which an official guide group which is responsible for organizing excursions to Etna and supervision over the tourists. Although it took some time to explain that we really want to hike on our own, we have finally received an answer: Hello, our cabin is open from 08.30. You can join Torre del filosofo being ...


7

Definitely rent a car, preferably a small and narrow one. Driving in cities is stressful and very very tight at times, but motorways and country roads are fine. Finding public transport is hard and it would take you forever to visit all the main sights though, so I would advise against this option (even though I like public transport either).


4

I can say whay is required for italians, guess that for foreigners is the same. For fishing in lakes and rivers (internal waters) you'll need a license that's not so easy to obtain for a foreigner on holidays (you have to pass an exam, and burocracy,...), so i don't raccomend you to choose a lake/river (and in Messina the best choice is the sea). For ...


4

This page lists the advanced booking restrictions for various train operators in Europe including those in Italy. Booking Horizon: Italy High-speed, medium & long-distance 4 months Regionale 2 months (7 days for paperless tickets) Edit: I realise that doesn't explain bookings after June 11, but this page should explain issues due to the Summer ...


4

My wife and me had actually the same question around ~10 years ago when going to Mount Etna. When I remember correctly, use of the cable car as well as a guide was mandatory for going upwards (but they let us walk down on our own). Not sure how the regulations are today, I guess your best bet is to contact a guide bureau (like this one) by phone or email ...


4

Italian speaking here: RENT A CAR. In Sicily (and generally speaking, southern Italy) you can't count on public transportation: delays, strikes, cancellations happens every day. During my latest trip to Sicily (2013) I rented a car with EuropCar and everything went fine. Just some notes on safety: Don't know where are you from, but in Sicily they drive ...


4

It's hard to give general advices since you didn't specify your itinerary but here are my two cents. If you only plan to visit the main touristy cities you shouldn't have any problem using buses and/or trains. Remember, in Italy the trains are available almost everywhere and it's usually a very convenient method to move around; Sicily is no exception. ...


3

Back from Sicily, renting a car was definitely the best advise especially for people interested in natural sites. Some major natural sites are indeed not accessible if you do not have a car, or they are only at some times. For the Etna, we were lucky enough to be present during the eruption. But you only see it at night when there is no more buses. There ...


3

I used public transport (bus) in Sicily and travelled to quite a few places (Palermo, Monreale, Catania, Etna, Taormina and had no problem whatsoever...


3

You might want to check opensignal.com, they have a map showing coverage - from that it would seem coverage on Sicily is below average for Italy; and I can tell you Italy in general is below average compared to other european countries. That said, it seem I TIM (Telecom Italia) is the only provider actually covering the whole of Sicily, with Vodafone and 3 ...


2

I can talk about the wifi coverage there. What I've been doing recently to determine speed of connections is to use Instabridge (not my app) - a free app for Android, that does two very important things: Shows where open wifi is (including password-protected ones which have been crowd-sourced - e.g. a kind soul has added his home wifi to the list). This is ...


2

Rome2Rio suggests a 4h50m bus journey from Agrigento to Siracusa via Catania as your cheapest and fastest option: Buses run several times a day and are operated by SAIS Trasporti, whose website details the itineraries and costs of all the tickets. Alternatively, you can choose a 5h regional train journey via Caltanissetta. This itinerary is available once ...


1

I'll definitely prefer Milan (Malpensa) over Rome, especially in the high season. Immigration lines at Rome airport are atrocious. Better yet, plan your routes to enter Schengen area outside Italy (stopover in Munchen, Warsaw and Zurich are nice in my experience; Frankfurt and Amsterdam too huge to be nice), then connect to Milan. Most of other airports ...


1

On google maps there is Discesa a mare nikà which matches up the location given in this page. Nikà è la località situata sul tratto costiero sud-occidentale dell'Isola di Pantelleria Roughly, Nikà is the locality situated on the South West coast of Pantelleria. Here's a picture of the sign leading down to the terme:


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