247

Sorry, it's a valid idea but it's not going to happen It's tricky to find passengers who will be on your flight before you pass through security. You would have to catch them at check in, before they check in their luggage. If you check in with Air Canada in Vancouver, there are flights to many different destinations. How would you find someone going to the ...


162

Sensible people will call security on you and you're probably going to get arrested. You may find a "mark" but you'd be placing a naive and people-pleasing person in a very bad and nerve-wracking predicament. Drug cartels have been known to smuggle drugs in very unusual places (sown inside dogs, in the texture of Virgin Mary statuettes, watermelons) and I ...


129

Unfortunately, you cannot. Nowadays anyone can use a small portable device to create a bogus Wi-Fi network, so even if you know SSID (network name), you still cannot be sure you are connecting to the right access point. For instance, if the official network is "Berlin Airport Wi-Fi", anybody can create their own network named "Berlin Airport Wi-Fi", and ...


126

Every country has their own laws governing handguns. Your license is for the US, under US (or state-specific) laws. Firstly, you'd have trouble at the border, as you generally need permission or a license to carry a gun on-board a plane, boat, train, or bus, or across international borders. Secondly, you would need a license under the laws of the country ...


110

The airline is liable. According to the Montreal convention the airline cannot disclaim liability via their contract of carriage or other terms and conditions. As in this analysis by the US DoT (not USA specific): We have become aware of tariff provisions filed by several carriers that attempt, with respect to checked baggage, to exclude certain items,...


104

I'm a Moscovite, so this answer is bound to be biased. Safety is a very relative notion, I perceive Moscow safer than quite a few cities I've been to in Western Europe and the US (or at least some of their neighborhoods). Anecdotally, I've once been detained by the US police for several hours out of the blue, so... yes, unexpected things happen everywhere. ...


103

Mark Mayo's answer is the best answer to this question; it is an appeal to common sense. I simply wanted to add some legal context for the UK. There are intersecting regulations for the EEA as a whole which are roughly similar. The 'generic' answer is that gun permits are generally issued by individual states, like Kentucky or Arizona. Individual states ...


92

Answer by a local here. I work 200 meters from Duomo of Milan, so I find them at the underground exit every morning. First and foremost, remember that most of the people doing this are pushed by a local "mafia" system. Therefore a good amount (from 70 to 80%) of their pay is just thrown away, and they live in a deplorable condition, so if you don't want to ...


90

Even ignoring the practicalities, it's a terrible idea. Without being too paranoid, I don't know what you have done with that knife. I don't want my finger prints on it, I don't want whatever substances it has been in contact with in my own bag, and I don't want to have any kind of explaining to do to law enforcement, especially upon arriving in the US.


87

I think the best write-up I've seen on this is at Corporatetravelsafety.com: They begin the Paris String Scam by engaging you in innocent conversation and will usually say that they want to show you a magic trick. Before you know it, a "string man" has grabbed your wrist or one or two fingers and encircled it with a homemade bracelet of colored ...


77

Invest in a Dry Egg/Box My suggestion is to take as little valuables as possible, and carry them in the water with you when you go for a dip. What I usually do is I take some form of plastic ID, a bit of cash, a payment card and my phone. I leave everything else at home since most likely I won't need it on the beach. Everything I take easily fits in what ...


73

Forget the fact that it's a knife for a moment. Would you accept a deal where you risk arrest just so a stranger can save (say) $30? If you're like most people, your answer is no. If you're not, well... there's your answer.


71

No. Since the bank is the one that has to assume the risk of unauthorized charges (by law, your liability can't be more than $50), it doesn't matter that you are "okay with taking the risk," because it's the bank's risk. The anti-fraud measures are there to protect the bank and are not optional. You might consider getting a card with a different bank, as ...


69

Asked and answered on Aviation.SE. Summary: They're required by US federal aviation regulations. The apparent rationale is: a desperate, or unscrupulous, smoker might (illegally) light a cigarette in the lavatory. If they do, it is good for there to be somewhere safe for them to put the cigarette butt. Otherwise, if they don't see anywhere else to put it, ...


67

You have to be assertive, just say NO! (or BASTA! or any other local equivalent ) loud and direct. That is how most locals deal with them. Don't interact with them, don't engage; turn/move away. If you feel threatened, walk away towards a store, shop or other places that look to be official (museum entrance, ...) and if you see a police, walk towards them....


59

I found this article. Loosely translated: Station Schiphol disallows balloons since recently. The reason for this is that it has happened a few times last year that a kid's ballon hit the overhead power lines, often resulting in smoke and smouldering particles. Because the smoke alarm is very sensitive, because of safety concerns with the long train ...


59

Just because your bag is triggered doesn't mean you will be in trouble. I bought a backpack at Heathrow duty free while in transit to the US which triggered a positive hit on the explosive wand - while it was still in the plastic. It got swiped twice, detected twice, and then the inspector looked at it and just let me through, no muss no fuss. In your case,...


58

Travelling with a firearm (in general) I've actually seen this scenario, where there has been an assumption by the (US) traveller that they would just be able to enter another country with their firearm. However, as @Mark Mayo states, each country has their own laws in this regard. It's important to realise other countries are likely to have much stricter ...


58

In places that I've felt to be a bit dodgier than usual I have done a few things: Sleep in shorts with a pocket and keep the key in my pocket. Thread the key onto a string and wear it around my neck. Put the key and other valuables inside my pillowcase / pillowslip. A good way to not forget your valuables are in your pillowcase is to also stash your ...


58

If the security is password only, the answer is that you can't: if they're logging your keystrokes, your password will be compromised, period. However, the best two-factor authentication system while on the road is not SMS, but app-based authentication like Google Authenticator. All you need is your mobile phone for generating the codes, and it doesn't even ...


56

Sometimes. At least in the TSA Precheck lanes in the United States, the metal detectors (Precheck lanes use metal detectors, not body scanners) can alarm randomly to alert the screeners to perform a random check (you can read various anecdotal experiences in this forum thread). Some people report it happening frequently enough to them that they suspect it'...


55

An embassy's premises are "inviolable" by the authorities of the host country, so the host country couldn't prevent the embassy from detaining anyone there. The embassy would have a hard time getting someone out of the host country without the cooperation of host country authorities, however. Of course, even if the UK could protect your friend, there is no ...


54

Here's a trick I learned many years ago when I used to work in a stationary/office supply shop, it always helped me unlock ANY padlock with a combination. You'd be surprised of the number of people who come back the next day to return the padlock/briefcase because they forgot the combination. This should be useful to any traveler since padlocks are always ...


53

Assuming that your friend is in a conflict with the bureaucracy of his home country, a much more likely problem is that the consulate will simply refuse to extend the passport and your friend would be forced to either leave the UK or apply for asylum there. Kidnapping, assaulting or killing someone at a foreign consulate is guaranteed to cause a diplomatic ...


51

Once when I found myself at the airport with no check-in baggage and a swiss army knife I wanted to preserve for sentimental reasons, I asked the airline staff giving me my boarding pass, if they could arrange to transport it for me. They agreed, and I was able to hand it over (at no cost) and later collect it at at airline's ticketing counter at my ...


49

I work at an airport in the UK. I would say that, unless the name of the public wifi is stated on advertising signage, the best thing to do is the ask a member of airport staff if there is anyone around, or head to the passenger information desk. I don't think there is any technical way to figure out which one is the official airport wifi. The airport's ...


48

In my experience, having a positive detection at the swab testing station is not a problem. The testing machines only give an indication of possible explosive residue, and are not conclusive. Several times I have had a positive detection at the swab test station (not actually carrying or handling any explosives). If they get a positive test, they may ask ...


48

Put everything which isn't physically attached to you in one place. You're less likely to leave all your luggage behind than forget one item, so it's a bad idea to have your gloves are on the seat opposite, your small bag in the overhead rack, and your suitcase in the luggage store at the end of the corridor.


47

This is a fairly simple approach, but I have a couple of different cards (including ATM/debit and credit) from different banks (which also helps with ATM compatibility issues). When I travel, I take care not to keep them all in the same place. This takes some effort to ensure they're being stored securely and don't get lost, since you're moving them around ...


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