New answers tagged

0

In terms of visa, it shouldn't be an issue as long as the visa is valid (and ideally that the "main purpose" of your travel remains in the country which issued the visa), though expect passport/visa checks while travelling between Greece and France, contrary to normal Schengen rules. However, in terms of the ever-changing Covid restrictions: ...


2

Right now, the whole of mainland France is under lockdown. Crossing provincial borders (département) is only allowed for limited purposes and nobody is supposed to travel anywhere for leisure (that's irrespective of citizenship or status). Restaurants, museums, and many shops are also closed. Since you are already in the Schengen area, most of the formal ...


2

Not sure about the general case (Guadeloupe / Schengen Area), but for the specific case of mixing stays in Guadeloupe with stays in metropolitan France: Note that the rule for Guadeloupe is not 90/180 but 3 months out of 6, starting at any entry into any of the territories concerned. Close, but not exactly the same in some edge cases. The 3 months out of 6 ...


8

As Harper - Reinstate Monica stated, most countries, and the countries of the Schengen Area are no exception, don't want you to use tourist/visitor visas to effectively live in a country through repeated visits. The rule of thumb usually applied is that you shouldn't be in the country (or area, in the case of Schengen) more than half of the time. If you're ...


2

Immigration has a rule of thumb that on a visitor visa, you are not to effectively live in a country via repeated visits. Given your affinity for the place, you should consider arranging a situation that would involve a non-visitor visa, such as getting hired in to a Benelux country.


1

If your country is in the visa-exempt 90/180 list for Schengen, then you are indeed exempt from needing a visa for your first ninety days in Schengen. Your time in Bulgaria does not affect it. When your ninety days are over, however, your visa (if in effect) means you are not guilty of overstay.


2

No. You have a visa to enter the Schengen area and you are allowed to enter Bulgaria as a visitor. That Bulgaria is an EU country does not mean you violate your Schengen visa at a later time for a different purpose. The only problem you can get is if you stay longer in Bulgaria than visitors are normally allowed, or if you violate some other condition of ...


22

I recall someone saying that you can't go to the same Schengen country as a tourist for 3 months over and over even if you don't overstay a trip, because immigration thinks that it's suspicious for some reason. They might find it suspicious, but it's not against the rules, and if they look at you more closely because of their suspicion, they ought not to ...


2

You don't get to specify a duration of validity on the standard form. The only dates you submit are those of your first trip to the Schengen area. What you can do is check the box asking for a multiple-entry visa and provide evidence of your need to travel to the Schengen area regularly. If you have a very specific and very convincing reason to want a two-...


2

I assume since you have a residence permit that you are a non-EU citizen. From the Europa website on "Travel documents for non-EU nationals", it says: Travel documents for non-EU nationals Passport and visa requirements If you are a non-EU national wishing to visit or travel within the EU, you will need a passport: valid for at least 3 months ...


7

In a nutshell, both Bulgaria and Romania apply the whole Schengen acquis (which means all the rules about entry and short stays, the SIS and Dublin regulations, the list of countries whose citizens need a visa, etc., etc. and not merely the 90/180 day limit) but only to one country (not as part of the Schengen area nor to both countries as a group). ...


2

Now, for personal reasons, we planned a trip to Greece and Italy in June, just a few days after her student visa expires. That's the first problem. But I was researching and it seems that with her American passport, she can legally enter Spain, Greece, and Italy on tourist terms, which seems perfect. Is this correct? Yes, see How to switch from Resident ...


Top 50 recent answers are included