New answers tagged

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You can stay in the Schengen area for a maximum of 90 days in any 180 (the 90/180 rule1). If you've already been in the area for 90 days you must stay away for 90 days before you return. Be aware that if you return after 90 days, planning to stay for another 90 days, sooner or later you will be denied entry as it will appear that you are trying to live in ...


1

The role of your sponsor is to confirm your source of funds. When people travel who cannot really afford the luxury of tourism, the immediate suspicion is that their trip is an investment and that they plan to repay it by overstaying and working. So there are two questions: Why would your sponsor give you the money as a gift? That's obvious for a father, ...


0

You don't say where you're from, which might affect things. But you should also include some documentation of ties to your home country as proof that you will leave Schengen again. It might be relevant to read: Schengen Visa Refusal: Justification for the purpose and conditions of the intended stay was not reliable and Schengen Visa Refusal: ...


2

Just an addition about the issues regarding hotel bookings. It is not directly required by law in Germany to be over the age of 18 to book a hotel room, but there are so many legal grey areas and pit-falls to consider, that most hotels don't allow persons under 18 to book a room or even use a room alone, if they are travelling alone without a parent or ...


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you need definitely more than a passport and money to come to Germany.. here the official info: https://europa.eu/youreurope/citizens/travel/entry-exit/travel-documents-minors/germany/index_en.htm I quote: Travel documents for minors – Germany In addition to their own valid travel document (passport or ID card), although not obligatory by law, ...


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As an EU citizen, you have a right to travel to Germany with minimal fuss. As a minor, Germany will try to protect you against running away from your parents or being abducted. According to German law, your legal guardians have the right and the duty to determine your locaction. They should do that in accordance with your age and maturity, so the law does ...


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I think it is true. You probably won't need a consent letter from your parents, but it couldn't hurt to have one. I would probably carry a letter signed by both of them, along with photocopies of their passports or IDs showing a matching signature. But I suppose you are unlikely to have to show it to anyone. You won't normally encounter government ...


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If you needed a travel or health insurance to get your visa, you need to carry a copy of the cover with you. And if this is a second or later visit on the same visa, you will need an up to date/new travel insurance or health cover for this travel. That is separate from the financial requirements as mentioned in the first answer.


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Usually they dont check anything except your passport and visa. but better to carry 1.Invitation letter (Incase of a business visa) 2.Travel Insurance (Mandatory document, should cover the travel duration) 3.Accomodation proof (Hotel bookings) 4.Air Tickets (to and fro)


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I am assuming it is a short term single entry tourist visa. Given the circumstances, I suggest you provide new offer letter with date of joining highlighted along with relieving letter from old company with date of last working date. Though this does not work as a replacement for NOC, the documents tells that you are not intending to move as an immigrant. ...


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I am worried they will (a) not let me board my flight from Edinburgh-Seville; There are no exit checks when leaving the UK. Airline staff will check your passport to see if you are allowed to enter Spain. They are extremely unlikely to check for an entry stamp. They will just want to see the ID page. (b) detain me or worse deport me (to the US) from ...


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A multiple entry Visa C should solve this problem if issued for 1 year it would allow 60 3 day trips. All you have to do is select multiple instead of single on the form. Add a cover letter stating your intension to use it during the year for weekend trips. Make sure the passport has a lot of free pages (3 stamps per visit). You you, after Brexit, 2 ...


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Base in the information found on the German Embassy Page you do not need a visa to enter Germany, conditions are the same as for Australian citizens For the Swedish Embassy I could find no clear cut statement as on the German site. Please remember that some trains from Hamburg to Sweden, go through Denmark. Holders of UN Travel Document / Titre de ...


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Note first that the actual Schengen rules -- that it, such things as the Visa Code or the consular handbook -- do not define any requirement for including a ticket reservation in a visa application. So if someone tells you that this is a generic requirement for all Schengen visas, they're misinformed and you should be cautious of trusting anything else they ...


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Visa is not a free pass card. I think (but not sure) they will check that you can afford the ticket (you can always get refund) and plausible travel. Consulate known a lot better what usually the local citizen want to visit (and in which deep). But you still have to enter to the country. They could verify that the purpose of travel it is the same as in the ...


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Albania seems to require a used multi-entry Schengen Visa C for entry, North Macedonia also (multi is not stated explicitly) could find no working official Albanien / North Macedonia sites to confirm this so this would be a valid reason to apply for one. When entering through Greece, the Visa will be considered used. Based on the available information, ...


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Tomorrow the trains will use tracks 9 and 10 respectively, which are on the same platform, so it would be pretty quick. You can check your itinerary for your date of travel, in Switzerland (contrary to France) tracks are assigned well in advance. There’s a good chance they will be the same. Note however that a TGV can be 500 meters long if it involves two ...


1

In case this helps anyone in the future, you can access your documents from the AXA Schengen website at any time. For "name of beneficiary" put your last name, and for "policy number" put the order reference (it begins with SCHE....) in the email that you got when you paid. If you didn't get the order email immediately then your payment either didn't go ...


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This constilation should pose no problem. your employment ends because you are starting an education in the US, both of which you can prove If you can show that this just is a stopover (ticket to US with F1 Visa) and can finance the time in the Schengen area, this should be treated as a valid travel reason. It is basically an extended transit. Write a ...


1

Yes. 1.5 hour is plenty unless there is unusual back up at immigration or your incoming flight is significantly delayed That's on the tight side. Mainly the problem is getting from gate to gate. Frankfurt is airport is huge so it depends a bit how far the gates are apart. If both flights arrive/depart from Pier A (typically for Schengen flights), than it's ...


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Neither the UK nor the Schengen area (which includes France) issues visas on arrival. Whichever way you're travelling, if your wife needs a visa, she needs to get it before you set off.


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Consider why you were refused the visa. There may be small differences in the acceptance rate, but that can change if some clerk gets reassigned to another desk. The rules are the same all across the Schengen area. You wanted a tourist visa. Did the trip you were planning make sense for a tourist? Can you reasonably afford the trip from your regular ...


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If you need a visa for the UK (you can easily check on https://www.gov.uk/check-uk-visa) you must apply and your application must be approved before you travel to and arrive in the UK. AFAIK Visa are NOT issued on arrival.


3

This is unfortunately not quite clear. The actual Schengen legislation that governs visa-free short stays does not clearly say that you must exit and re-enter the Schengen area in order to "trigger" your visa-free period. In fact it seems to be hard to argue that this is even a plausible interpretation of any text in the regulation. On the other hand, there ...


0

Since the implementation of the 90/180 rule is based on Schengen entry and exit stamps assume that the full days in these microstate countries will be included in the Schengen clock where no Schengen exit/entry stamps exist when checked by any border or consulate official. EU relations with Andorra, Monaco and San Marino 2012 Andorra 2.2.2 not within ...


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https://www.schengenvisainfo.com/schengen-visa-countries-list/ You can apply for visa at the Finnish embassy. You can travel with that visa to Prague and Switzerland.


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Switzerland is a member of the Schengen area, and has been for several years now. You should apply for a visa for the country where the "main purpose" of your trip occurs, in this case that would presumably be Finland: You must lodge the application for a Schengen visa at the Consulate of the country that you intend to visit, or –if you intend ...


1

Without your EU family member, you can normally use that card (in combination with your passport) to go anywhere a Schengen residence permit will take you. That includes the Schengen area and all but two of the non-Schengen EU countries. The two countries that are not included are the UK and Ireland. However, in a comment you have indicated that you do ...


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Informationen about Irish Transit visa and conditions with list of citizenships that need it as well as fees.


1

No. Schengen consulates in the US know that the US accepts valid visas in old passports. Schengen does too, by the way.


1

Check with your local Bezirkshauptmannschaft if they will give you a temporary paper while your documents are being processed. My wife is Russian and we live in Austria. During the waiting period for her permanent residence card, she got issued some paper that essentially said she has a residence permit, it's just not printed yet. We didn't need it, so no ...


2

There is no maximum, but if you're entering or leaving the EU with cash worth more than 10,000 euro, you are required to declare it at customs. There is no minimum amount of cash either. As a third-country national you may be asked to show that you have "the means" to keep yourself fed etc. during your visit -- but those means don't have to be cash. A well-...


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Can you do it? Yes, probably. You will probably just get through, and nobody even notices or cares. I've not been controlled in the street in almost 5 decades, and I've not been controlled on an EU border (including non-Schengen, very much to my surprise!) in... don't know how many years. 15 years at least. Should you do it? No. Germany in particular ...


3

At first I thought "I need a passport". That part is true for sure. US Citizens need a passport to get BACK to the US from just about anywhere, so that's important. Whether you need a visa or other documentation is country specific. Most of the countries in the EU (Germany among them) are part of the Schengen Agreement. The Schengen agreement allows ...


2

The reason airlines sometimes ask for return tickets before they issue a boarding pass is that some countries require proof of return or onward travel as a condition of admitting certain travelers. Those travelers won't make it through the passport check on arrival if they don't have the necessary ticket. Worse, if the airline brings such a traveler to the ...


2

Germany now issues card-sized eAT residency permits which are not in your passport. The old passport stickers remain valid for some years, but sticker holders can get the card in "exceptional cases" and also if they would need a new sticker e.g. for a new passport. So you will get an eAT sooner or later. Ask how quick you can get one. At a guess, 10 days ...


2

I think you are overthinking. You are doing a very common type of travel. You need a ticket which bring you outside Schengen. It is not important from where. Is is very common to arrive on a airport and depart to an other, either for business and for travel. (medium and long travels. Daily travels inside Schengen, or to/from e.g. UK or nearby countries are ...


5

To travel within Schengen, you are technically still required to have travel documents on you. In addition to that, all the Scandinavian countries have had "emergency" border checks with the rest of Schengen for a few years now. You will almost certainly be asked to show your passport or ID card at the Denmark/German border, and turned back if you do not ...


2

the short answer is no. according to this: https://www.schengenvisainfo.com/who-needs-schengen-visa/ both Russians and Kazakhstan citizens need a valid visa to enter Austria. Since you lost the BlueCard, you can not prove that you are allowed to move in the Schengen area...


5

You don't need a visa to enter France if you hold a Travel Document in Lieu of National Passport, and the travel document shows your citizenship as Israeli. This is the typical case if you are a recent immigrant to Israel. The official French government visa site states you do not need a visa in this case. It is also shown in Timatic, the database which ...


2

You definitely need your passport to cross borders within the schengen area, those rules are set by each country, you may not get checked at each border but that’s a different issue in itself. Even as a citizen in a country that participated in the Schengen Agreement passports are normally carried for international travel although it might not be strictly ...


41

Schengen does not remove the requirement to have appropriate documentation when crossing borders (or even within a country). It only removes systematic checks at borders. You can still have spot checks at border points. There could also be "emergency measures" checks restored at some borders. There could even be spot checks inside a country, completely ...


12

Exact requirements for crossing intra-schengen borders are set in national law, so it will depend on exactly where you are travelling, but in general, you will usually be required to carry a recognized travel document when crossing intra-schengen borders. For most practical purposes, this also applies to EU/EEA citizens. In your particular case, you will be ...


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