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0

Doubtful. Below is the full text that probably reflects the IATA statement. You will see that there is a bit more to it than just making a booking. Assume that the Schengen Border Control will be looking for proof that you have been in a risk free area for at least 14 days. Then they will be looking for proof that you are a resident of one of the exempted ...


0

If the airport has a transit corridor (which Paris-CDG does), and your nationality doesn't require an airport transit visa, then yes, you can transit. However, for France, you'll need to complete and print this form, to show the airline during boarding. Select this option: Ressortissant de pays tiers, en transit de moins de 24 heures en zone internationale ...


8

Enforcing this very strictly is not a priority. There are ways to know (asking neighbours, looking at financial transactions, rent agreements, local police noticing your car a lot, etc.) but I don't think they are used a lot. In some countries, hotels and other commercial accommodation providers also have to check their guests ID but that's not the case ...


3

Within the Schengen area, they usually don't know. That's the price to pay for having low-friction travel over the internal borders. Any attempt to work illegally could come to the attention of the fiscal authorities. Similar for formal education. The lack of a presence in the country where they are supposed to be could cause problems, e.g. for a job or ...


2

Schengen doesn't register entries/exits electronically - SIS certainly has nothing to do with that. It is through entry/exit stamps that overstays can be detected, though not all border agents are scrupulous about checking them. When travelling within the Schengen Area, no stamps are issued, so there is indeed no easy way to check if the 90-day rule for ...


0

Per TIMATIC, you can enter Spain in the following cases: If arriving from EU/Schengen/UK If residing in EU/Schengen/UK, Andorra, Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, Monaco, Montenegro, New Zealand, Rwanda, San Marino, Serbia, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay or the Vatican If holding a Schengen D visa If eligible to hold an Article 10/20 family member residence ...


0

Got this answer back from the EU counsel today, we are not married but in a durable relationship of 20 years, so hoping this falls under the term spouse,so I can travel to several member countries in the Bloc and not have to worry about the 90/180 day rule. Dear Sir/Madam, Please find below the reply to your enquiry. Please note that the advice given by Your ...


4

Assuming your partnership is not registered, you will be able to benefit from the free movement directive only after your partnership is "duly attested," meaning that you have presented evidence of your relationship to the authorities and they have accepted that it is a "durable relationship" for the purpose of the directive. In practice,...


-2

No, the Freedom of Movement applies only to family members of an EU Citizen who have a residence permit issued by a Member state. The 90/180 days rule will then apply for such short term visits. The Freedom of Movement applies for: Short term (not exceeding 3 months) Union citizens and their family members who have already obtained a residence card of a ...


1

If you are ordinarily resident in the UK you might not be able to apply in Kuwait. However, once you have a valid visa, you may enter from wherever you wish. There are many reasons why you might wish to do that - a lack of direct flights, for example, or a multi-stop itinerary. It's commonplace and won't raise an eyebrow anywhere. (Thanks to @MarkJohnson for ...


2

That depends on the EU country. As you can see on https://reopen.europa.eu/en and https://www.iatatravelcentre.com/international-travel-document-news/1580226297.htm, each EU country has a different policy. For example, from my understanding of the current policies, as a someone who has been in Britain long-term under a long-duration tourist visa or visa-...


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