New answers tagged

1

It might also depend on the decision itself. The process you describe reminds me of the way it works in France (where you have to appeal to the Commission de recours contre les décisions de refus de visa d'entrée en France first, as opposed to going to court directly as you would in many countries). There, an administrative judge has two options if they ...


2

As a foreign citizen you have no automatic right to be allowed access to a country. The authorities decided on a case by case basis if you should be allowed temporary or permanent access based upon: Your personal circumstances at that time The information and documents you have provided as part of that application Any information which they might have ...


1

You can enter Romania with a double entry or multiple entry Schengen visa valid for Schengen states. It is not necessary to have visited a Schengen member state before visiting Romania on this visa. So that you can receive the correct visa type and sufficient duration, you should still include your travel plans including Romania as part of your Schengen ...


5

Should I fill Denmark as my first entry, and leave from Denmark also, and provide my train booking to her with my application? Yes. Is this going to bring problems if my entry is Denmark and I have a visa from Sweden? No.


1

You should contact the office at which you applied (in your case the migration department office of Latvia), their phone number is: +371 67209400 You can tell them you made a mistake and ask them to change it, I’m sure they’ll understand.


2

This depends on the type of cruise. In particular for the port of St. Petersburg, passengers of cruise ships are not required to have an entry visa into Russia for up to 72 hours, but only in case they have officially booked tours with licensed tour providers. Therefore, the validity of passport is not important. information on visa-free entry in Russia ...


2

Assuming you're not an EU/EFTA citizen or resident: For Scandinavia, the passport needs to be valid for 3 months beyond the period of intended stay (in the Schengen Area) For Russia, the passport just needs to be valid during the stay. So no, contrary to the other answer, no need to renew your passport.


4

Yes, you can provide the funding. Regarding the edited bullet points: You cannot establish her willingness to leave the Schengen area since you cannot make her leave. Making such a promise won't be helpful. You can establish where the funding for her part of the trip comes from and that the two of you have a stable economic situation with your company. A ...


-4

Most countries in Europe (Schengen specifically) require that your passport be valid for at least 6 months before entry. However, this is NOT the case with the UK. They just require that your passport be valid for the entire duration of your stay. However, when entering Scandinavia, you’ll need at least 6 months validity, so yes you will need to renew it.


3

The issue with the first application was that they doubted you would actually leave at the end of the trip. If you were to re-apply you need to provide as much solid evidence as possible to assure their worries you will not stay in the country after your visit. You said you mentioned your job last time, but you need to be very clear about it, show your ...


8

Schengen is an area of free circulation for people, so it removes systematic border controls of IDs. Customs are for goods, not people. Most customs checks are removed within the EU. Even though most Schengen countries are in the EU and most EU countries are in Schengen, there are exceptions both ways: some EU countries are not in Schengen, like Ireland ...


2

The internal borders of the Schengen area have no systematic immigration checks. There may be random spot checks, but if so you will be asked. It is a very good idea to carry your passport. (Some countries do not conduct checks at the border, but they run random checks in the border area. Legally it might be a difference if you are asked for your papers as ...


11

When traveling from Schengen EU country to Schengen EU country by direct border you will not see customs, if you fly between Schengen EU countries you might see customs but can ignore them by going through an EU lane or nothing to declare. For the non EU Schengen countries there is likely to be a customs check but no passport stamp, they might want to see ...


0

It depends on the airport. Sometime there are passport controls later, e.g. just near the gate, and such control will be done only when there is a flight outside Schengen. You see this in a lot of small holiday airports (also in Greece, Spain, etc.). Sometime it is more convenient such setup, e.g. if there are few international flights, so no need to have a ...


2

Your proof of accommodation is where you will be staying/sleeping for the duration of your trip. I recommend not providing any accommodation and adding a note saying you will only go for 1 day or just put the address of your house as that is where you will be sleeping (if you have to provide something).


1

Yes, it is absolutely fine if you have a Schengen Visa. Single entry refers to the fact that you can enter and leave the Schengen region only once. There are 650 different ways to arrive/visit/depart two countries in the Schengen zone. You can travel all Schengen country till you are here inside Schengen even it is a single entry visa. Single entry means ...


5

As long as you remain in the Schengen Area the whole time, yes, a single-entry visa will allow you to go to Düsseldorf then Eindhoven then Frankfurt. However, this means any travel you have between these places must remain within the Schengen Area (i.e. direct flights, trains, buses or car from one to the other, or via other cities inside Schengen). If on ...


0

Just updating here that I applied for my Schengen visa and got it in 5 working days from the Italian consulate in Mumbai! With a multiple entry 6 month validity for a maximum of 90 days each time. My application had the same itinerary as mentioned above in my question.


4

It's a sliding window, not a period You may be thinking the 180 days are Jan. 1-July 1, or 6-month anniversaries or something. Not at all. The 180 days in question are starting from 180 days ago. So August 20 through today (Feb 15). Tomorrow, the 180 days will be August 21 til tomorrow (Feb 16). If 90 of those 180 days have been in Schengen, then ...


2

Do not assume that the generel rule always applies. The complete text states that it can take longer, depending on the situation. Since no one here knows about your specific situation (such as first time applicant etc.), no one can give any other realistic answer than: you must wait Processing of a visa application As a general rule, a decision is ...


5

No, that trick doesn't work. Schengen has a 90-of-180 rule, which says you can only be in Schengen 90 days of the last 180 days. If you stay 90 days in Schengen, you must then leave to avoid an overstay. However, Poland has a special rule allowing 90 additional days for Americans. So you can use up your Schengen 90 days, then, go another 90 days in ...


0

Minimum subsistence requirements are published here https://ec.europa.eu/home-affairs/sites/homeaffairs/files/e-library/documents/policies/borders-and-visas/schengen/docs/handbook-annex_25.pdf The reference amount for adequate means of subsistence for the planned duration of stay in France is €65 per day per individual or €120 if no proof of accommodation ...


1

Contrary to the suggestion in another answer, proving links to the UK will not be necessary beyond proving your UK nationality, because EU freedom of movement is still in place during the transition period. The main problem you will likely face is that you will most likely have to prove your UK nationality when you return to the UK, because if the ...


1

According to this and other sources: https://ec.europa.eu/home-affairs/sites/homeaffairs/files/what-we-do/policies/borders-and-visas/visa-policy/apply_for_a_visa/docs/visa_lists_en.pdf A Mauritius passport holder is allowed to visit France (Schengen area) and stay for up to 90 days within a 180 day period without a visa. You need to ensure that you have ...


0

Type D: National visa or visa for research purposes. You are required to stay in Germany for longer than three months within the six-month period after your first entry. Any person in possession of a National visa and valid travel documents are permitted to move freely in the Schengen area for up to three months in any six-month period. NOTE: A Type D ...


2

No, it should not be an issue, countries do not care where you come from. The important things are that: You stay within the dates of validity of the visa The duration of your stay is similar to what you originally indicated, and of course within the limit set by the visa The reason for your stay remains the same, at least remains in the scope of the visa. ...


0

As a South African citizen you need to have a visa before entering Germany. And this visa has to be applied for in the country where you are resident or a citizen. If you enter Germany with a Schengen tourist visa then you will be expected to leave within 90 days and not exceed the 80 in 180 day rule (depending on exactly what type of visa you have the ...


2

The issueing of Schengen C-Visas, is on the one side restrictive, but on the otherhand practical. So it is a combination of how the visa was used in the past and the need in the future. In your case, you have allready fullfilled step 01 (properly used a single business visa). For the next application apply for a multiple entry business visa (checkbox ...


3

Usually multiple-entry, long-validity visa are granted after one one more single-entry, short-validity visa without overstay or incident. There are anecdotes of people getting multiple-entry visa to start with, but I don't think that can be forced, and the Netherlands now say they don't do that.


5

You seem to be under the mistaken impression that an invitation is necessary to apply for a visa. It is not. To accompany you on your business visit, your wife does not need an invitation from her employer, though it may be helpful to include a confirmation of her leave. She does not need anything from your employer other than an acknowledgement that she ...


1

Nothing happens. You don't have to go because you got a visa. The reason they asked you to visit the embassy is to verify that you really left Schengen area. It may be a good idea to call them, tell them that you didn't travel, and ask if you should come by with your passport to prove that you didn't.


1

They ask about money because they want to know if you are genuine tourists and not immigrants. A tourist can afford the trip. Each member of the group has to explain where the money for the trip comes from, and show his or her finances. For normal tourists, travel expenses are a luxury. Their travel expenses are a reasonable part of their annual income. ...


4

You apparently haven't understood the actual 90/180 rule. The rule states that you must not have been in the Schengen Area more than 90 days in any 180 day period. So, on any day, you need to check that in the previous 180 days, you were not more than 90 days in the Schengen Area. The 180 day period doesn't "start" anywhere, and can't be "reset", it's just ...


2

When it comes to passport control, during the transition period, UK nationals will still be allowed to queue in the areas reserved for EU arrivals only. https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-politics-51194363 Nothing changes until December 31st 2020.


-1

You need one application for one trip. That application is made at the consulate of the main destination of your trip. This seems to be Italy, considering the trade show. Your application should explain the itinerary for your trip. Since you are mixing business and tourism, explain clearly where you are going for business, and which parts in between are ...


3

Nothing will change during the transition period; as such you'll be able to enter the Schengen Area indefinitely, without your passport being stamped and using the EEA lanes. The nature of the transition period is negotiating future rules; the rules, therefore, remain unchanged in the meantime. Source: https://www.gov.uk/visit-europe-1-january-2021


1

1) Is it possible to give generic itinerary details (eg: business meetings, lead follow-ups) in the cover letter for the 2-week extension post the trade show in Milan since I do not have any confirmed invitation letters yet from other businesses yet? Yes this is totally fine. 2) Is it ok to give "tourism" details for Frankfurt in the same application? I ...


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