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2

I think you will fail when applying for visa for many travels spread over two years. Not because who you are but because everybody would. The usual method is to apply for the first travel and when back home apply for the second. When you have travelled to the Schengen area several times on short term visa it is much more likely to get a multiple entry visa ...


7

So, if I get a Schengen multi entry tourist visa from say Netherlands, spend a few days there and then stay in X for 2 months, would that violate the visa rules? Is this ok? Yes, that would violate the rules. According to the EU Visa Code, you must apply for your visa from the Member State whose territory constitutes the main destination of the visit(s) in ...


4

"schengenvisainfo.com" is not the "rule makers", instead it is a site with resources for reserving/buying tickets and useful links. Neither it is an official government site nor a ticket buying platform. As you said, they linking applicants to use the "visareservation.com" website was more likely a advertisement or a referral ...


4

You mean the slightly darker spot around the number 14? That is nothing, no need to worry about that.


2

No. Even if the embassy for whatever reason should ignore the regulations and issue you a visa, the requirement is also checked when you enter Greece. When you fly to Greece, you must expect the airline to verify that your papers are valid for entering Greece and since they are not, deny boarding. And at last, even if also the airline makes a mistake and ...


9

You cannot apply for specifically a five-year Schengen visa. The length of visa will be decided by the country granting the visa. When submitting your visa application, you should answer with the details of the trip(s) you are currently planning: Your "intended departure date" is the date you leave the Schengen Area at the end of your planned trip....


4

I asked the German Consulate in Toronto and here is their answer (relevant excerpt from the full screenshot here): With regards to your question, a tourist visa will be issued as per submitted documents at your visa appointment. In other words, if you submit documents for a trip to Germany from December 23rd to 31st, the visa will be issued for exactly that ...


2

Changing your mind or slightly altering your plans is not illegal per se and the visa sticker won't mention your original plan. On the other hand, your visa will have a period of validity and that's the only thing that matters. If, as is likely, you are issued a visa valid from December 15th then you are out of luck and cannot present yourself to the border ...


2

You should be fine. Travel from Canada to Germany is at the moment relatively easy. Canadian residents have unrestricted access to Germany (https://www.bmi.bund.de/SharedDocs/faqs/EN/topics/civil-protection/coronavirus/travel-restrictions-border-control/travel-restriction-border-control-list.html#f13919566) It's unclear why you did apply for a Visa. ...


3

De jure there are dozens of complex laws and regulations regarding remote employment, under which you may or may not need a special visa in order to work remotely in a given country. Tax laws are an additional complication, where countries such as the UK can deem you as a tax resident for spending as little as 16 days on British soil. And things might be ...


1

Lots of countries these days are creating digital nomad visa's to account for traveling remote workers. Italy doesn't appear to be one of these countries though. To work in Italy, in any capacity you do have to have a work visa. That is just in consideration with the legalities of Italy though. Your own company may have its own set of rules regarding where ...


-6

You need to ask your company about that & it depends on the company if your company allows then you can work remotely from anywhere in the world if your company allows.


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