29

If you're making a day trip to the UK and then back to the place you arrived from, then you're not in transit, and a transit visa wouldn't do you any good. You'd need a Standard Visitor Visa, which must be applied for in advance. The 8 days you have until you leave will probably not be enough for this application to be completed unless you pay for super-...


27

There is no requirement that visitors to the Schengen area (which Czechia is part of) need to be invited by a citizen or resident. The standard procedure is that your friend would apply for a visa for a tourist visit on his own behalf and get a visa on the strength of his own circumstances. Then once he arrives he'd be free to visit you or not. Generally ...


24

In Czech Republic, invitations (pozvání) are highly formalized and often impractical. Here's the process: Depending on the type of invitation (see below), you may need to prepare a bank statement or ATM slip showing how much funds you have. You visit a foreigners' police office (odbor cizinecké policie) and fill out a form on a computer. The form is printed ...


17

Transit visas are for entering a country where the only purpose – or, at least, the main purpose – is to connect to transport to a third country. Your purpose for visiting the UK is purely tourism: you want to spend a few hours visiting and then return to the country you came from. You can't do that on a transit visa: you need a ...


13

No problem at all if you explained it in your visa application. If you want to make changes to your original itinerary, that is also possible, but then you must avoid the appearance that you misrepresented your itinerary. Having hotel reservations, etc., for Switzerland should resolve this.


7

Yes, she can apply for a visa as a family member of an EU citizen. It doesn't matter how she got her ILR/residence permit/etc, that's irrelevant for the Schengen visa rules. She is the spouse of an EU citizen, so she's eligible to apply on that basis. As she is eligible to apply as a family member of an EU citizen, she should do so - the application ...


6

Norway is part of the Schengen area (most of the European Union, plus Norway, Switzerland and Liechtenstein), which has a common visa scheme. In particular, Schengen includes Italy so if you actually have a multiple-entry Schengen visa that's still valid, you can already travel to Norway. Alternatively, the fact that you've already had a Schengen visa means ...


5

What you've found by googling is correct, the VAC staff member seems to have misinformed you. Flights within the Schengen area, such as your flight from Frankfurt to Helsinki, are esssentially "domestic" flights for immigration purposes - there are generally no immigration controls before or after them (occasional spot-checks may be possible). Your paperwork ...


5

You did your job great. Schengen rules require that you apply for the visa by the main destination of your itinerary, not the port of entry. You applied in Switzerland, you are going to visit Switzerland for the main of your journey. Check ✔ Now, Schengen rules allow you to visit every Schengen country in any order. No one forbids you to stay in Germany ...


4

This constilation should pose no problem. your employment ends because you are starting an education in the US, both of which you can prove If you can show that this just is a stopover (ticket to US with F1 Visa) and can finance the time in the Schengen area, this should be treated as a valid travel reason. It is basically an extended transit. Write a ...


3

Yes, a Nigerian citizen becomes eligible for Turkish e-Visa if he/she is holding a valid Schengen visa. Please note that there are some additional requirements. The website returned the following ones. I chose "Nigeria" and "Ordinary Passport" to see this list. You must meet all the requirements listed below in order to obtain an e-Visa. Please confirm ...


3

This is unfortunately not quite clear. The actual Schengen legislation that governs visa-free short stays does not clearly say that you must exit and re-enter the Schengen area in order to "trigger" your visa-free period. In fact it seems to be hard to argue that this is even a plausible interpretation of any text in the regulation. On the other hand, there ...


3

No, unfortunately for you the Schengen 90/180 rule is hard and fast. The only way to go to the Schengen area for more than 90 days is to get a national visa from the country where you will reside. As you were not granted a dependent visa for Germany, you cannot exceed the 90/180 rule. With a multiple-entry visitors visa, however, you can spread your 90 ...


3

According to the German Missions in the United States page on Schengen Visa / Short Stay Visa an appointment in Washington is not going to work: Visas must be applied for at the German Embassy or Consulate General in charge of the applicants place of residence (for example an Indian citizen with H1B Visa residing in Portland/ Oregon must apply at the ...


2

No, you're good for the Schengen states with your current visa. You can even enter Croatia on it since it's a multi visa.


2

For Croatia (and possibly Albania and North Macedonia) a single Schengen Visa C is not a valid visa because it does not insure that you can return to the Schengen area that was why you were refused entry and sent back to Slovenia. Slovenia should have cancelled their Schengen exit stamp. Legally you did not leave the Schengen area during this process. ...


2

Short answer: no, this must be applied for in your country of residence The Verpflichtungserklärung is a legally binding declaration that the signer will cover all costs of a foreign national while in Germany this is mainly intended for German residents only The Visa guidelines state this can also be used for travel visas which a consulate or embassy can ...


2

Informationen about Irish Transit visa and conditions with list of citizenships that need it as well as fees.


2

Assuming that the visa is for multiple entries, and that you've completed the trip to Czechia you got it for, then: Yes, you can use it for travel to anywhere in the Schengen Area without any further formalities.


2

Assuming you have an unexpired multiple-entry visa, it's valid for any country in the Schengen zone, which includes France.


2

Most countries don't put "occupation" in their passports at all. Given the frequency people change jobs or careers in today's world, I think most western countries would find it completely unreasonable to consider a job change to invalidate someone's passport. Any "occupation" notation in a passport will be taken as an indication of what the holder's job ...


2

Both Germany and Finland are in the Schengen Area, so the flight between Frankfurt and Finland is internal to Schengen, and you enter the Schengen Area in Frankfurt and that will be problem if your visa is not valid. Your problems might (should) already start when you try to baord the plane in Shanghai as the airline will probably not allow you to board ...


2

If you have your passport, you can apply for the Schengen visa at any time in the three months leading up to your travel. But the application will be stronger if you wait until you have the study visa. If you apply before you have the study visa, you'll need to convince the consulate that you don't have a plan B of "go to Paris, stay there illegally and ...


2

Yes, that's the purpose of the Schengen Zone; to encourage inter-European trade and commerce. You need to apply in the EU country that you will be spending the most time in and if it's a tie in terms of days, you need to apply to the first country you will be landing in.


2

You can't do anything to ensure getting a multi-entry visa. The authorities are free to issue whatever type of visa they feel like, their decision depends on multiple things: your travel history (frequency and obeying the terms are good) your citizenship your country of residence (I've probably forgotten something)


1

If it is a multi-entry, long-term visa and it actually gets issued, you should not have problems entering Sweden (I assume this is first port of entry) and also you should not have problems entering Norway (or is it on the same trip?). If anyone asks why Sweden and not Norway, just answer that you have plans to re-visit Sweden later when on the same visa. ...


1

My experience, you will likely need to mention the status of your visa when filing for your kids, but it is possible in principle to avoid that. Rules require that: Both parents file for visa together with kids. Both parents provide copy of their visa. One or both parents submit a note that they allow their kid to travel (this may vary per jurisdiction, in ...


1

The role of your sponsor is to confirm your source of funds. When people travel who cannot really afford the luxury of tourism, the immediate suspicion is that their trip is an investment and that they plan to repay it by overstaying and working. So there are two questions: Why would your sponsor give you the money as a gift? That's obvious for a father, ...


1

Once (correctly) issued, a Schengen short-stay visa cannot be extended except in situations of force majeure (natural disaster, sudden illness, strikes etc) that physically prevent you from leaving the Schengen Area within the limits. The way to do what you want to is to apply for another visa that will cover your additional visit in Spain. Since Spain is ...


1

A multiple entry Visa C should solve this problem if issued for 1 year it would allow 60 3 day trips. All you have to do is select multiple instead of single on the form. Add a cover letter stating your intension to use it during the year for weekend trips. Make sure the passport has a lot of free pages (3 stamps per visit). You you, after Brexit, 2 ...


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