9

I've done a tour of the Salt flats in January 2010 which is the summer down there and even then it got cold at night because it is pretty high up - 3,656 meters (11,995 ft). I did a tour with a local operator as everybody else did, there are dozens of 4x4s out there every day. The accommodation was indeed very basic, especially on the second night. We ...


6

So there are two options. 1) You're planning on doing a Salt Flats tour, if you're going to Uyuni? Most of these run from Uyuni to San Pedro de Atacama in Chile, or vice versa, and take 3ish days. It's well worth it and you should consider that if you haven't already, as it'll make the next part really easy. Once you're in San Pedro, there are buses over ...


6

Short answer: You really can't. Long answer: The most direct way (ie not taking a Potosi bus and connecting) is to take just two buses. The first bus will be from Uyuni to La Paz. This can take 12-15 hours depending on the time of day, the bus company, your driver (some will pull over for a few hours to sleep!) and stops (some stop in El Alto to drop off ...


5

It will depend on how much time you have. Salar de Uyuni is HUGE (10,582 square kilometers), and not only you will need time to get there, but also to see the many different facets of it. Still, it is possible to visit it from Chile if you have enough time. You can get a train from Avaroa on the Chilean border, but keep in mind the schedule is not exactly ...


5

I also started in Uyuni, on a standard three day tour you spend the first day on the salt lake, getting off it in the evening, then going further south the second day visiting various lakes and rock formations, the third day you are going back to Uyuni. If you want to go to San Pedro you are dropped off at the border to Chile in the morning of the third day,...


4

Renting just books is unlikely, although there's no reason why if that were a frequent request. Definitely, having rain boots to visit Uyuni is a good idea if during the rainy season. Although personally I went during that season, that year they were experiencing a drought, so it was quite dry! Buying daily items in Bolivia is very cheap, so it is possible ...


4

Unfortunately, I don't think there's many options in Uyuni for accommodation. I slept in the same place Peter mentions, and I was honestly anxious when it began to get colder and colder outside. The 'common area' was fine though, the tour guides (a really nice couple) gave us some sleeping bags and there were also blankets in the room. It might be because ...


3

By bus, the easiest is going to be a stop in La Paz, Bolivia. You have two options from Puno. The direct - through the border and round the south side of Lake Titicaca to La Paz. It doesn't take that long - about 5 hours from memory, although I've heard it can take 8. Option B is the ferry through to Copacobana. It's meant to be quite the experience, but ...


3

You pretty much will have to go on a tour. It's through a national park area, and in addition to that, requires extensive knowledge of the area - there aren't many roads as such. So you'll go on a tour, and they'll guide you through the border. So in that regards, yes, it's very easy. You join a tour, and follow their instructions :) I can recommend ...


3

The nearest airport, UYU, is a domestic airport; you will need to connect at La Paz (LPB). Amaszonas and TAM offer UYU-LPB services. Arequipa, for its part, has limited international service, and you would need to connect on a LAN or TACA flight through Lima (LIM).


3

Local buses don't have routes into the vast area of Salar de Uyuni, within which the Isla Incahuasi is located. The Salar de Uyuni is massive, over 4,000 square miles (10,582 sq. km). Tours of the area start in Uyuni, at the edge of the Salar, and, of necessity, in a 4x4 vehicle that can navigate the terrain which, while flat, is often covered by a layer of ...


2

Tours on the Bolivian side are significantly cheaper. On your own, it's easy to get from Uyuni to San Pedro, if a bit time consuming. Public buses run four times a week between Uyuni and Calama, take 7-9 hours, and run by day. In Calama, it's easy to get another bus to San Pedro.


1

You can go on a tour from San Pedro de Atacama (in Chile) which takes 3/4 days, visits sites in both Chile and Bolivia and will get you back to San Pedro, for about 200USD. As an alternative, you can get a bus from Calama to Uyuni, which takes 7-9 hours, depending on border formalities, while the bus only runs by day and only on 4 days a week. The ticket is ...


1

You can get there from Sucre, Potosí or Tupiza. They also have an airport so you have the option of flying in. Source: I live in Tarija. I give tours of Tarija.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible