New answers tagged

13

SAFE - because of a wave of new Federal regulations In 1999 the Federal Railroad Administration massively rewrote the steam locomotive rules (49 CFR 230). For instance: Historically, every time a new boiler was designed, the builder had to file a document called "Form No. 4". This documented every aspect of boiler design, and its safe operating ...


15

I can't really comment on many specifics for the US, but I can comment in general on a few points of concern with heritage trains: Crashworthiness I don't know about the specific regulations in the US, and I haven't been able to find anything specific, but certainly globally most heritage/preserved/museum railways would generally be running at reduced speeds ...


53

Boiler explosions - even in older devices/industry/locomotives - have dramatically reduced over time, in part due to new safety developments and inspections. It's been over 25 years since the last one in a locomotive: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_boiler_explosions Based on that, yes, it can happen, but it's incredibly rare and can be about as ...


4

Never do this. I just got off the road in Revelstoke and am writing this after the most harrowing hour of driving along winding mountain roads in the dark with 4 semis tailgating me and oncoming semis blinding you with their headlights. The road lines are practically non-existent and you can’t see more than 5 metres in front of you. If you go too slow, the ...


11

The hide tide submerges the 4-kilometer-long Passage du Gois twice a day, making it a very special road. The road goes from Beauvoir on the continent (East) to the island of Nourmoutier (West) and crosses the Bourgneuf bay. There a current flowing from the North to the South toward the Goulet de Fromentine. The current tends to remove or deposit sediments ...


Top 50 recent answers are included