Hot answers tagged

54

Boiler explosions - even in older devices/industry/locomotives - have dramatically reduced over time, in part due to new safety developments and inspections. It's been over 25 years since the last one in a locomotive: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_boiler_explosions Based on that, yes, it can happen, but it's incredibly rare and can be about as ...


26

No, you're always subject to local law/policy in the country you visit. The only way to protect yourself from it is by simply not going there. If it can be objectively proven officials have broken the law at your expense, I suppose the embassy can help with getting a local lawyer, but that's about it. This scenario hardly qualifies.


22

Do you believe that a foreign passport gives immunity from "harassment" by the CBP at the US border? No? Why should the US passport work any differently in this regard? Well, realistically it does, to some degree. The US government may act if their citizens are are harassed and the US has more leverage than many other countries. But that will only ...


17

It's a simple process: Find out if I am allowed to travel there from my home country If I am, don't go there. Such lax restrictions means this destination is open to a new wave of infections, and so is not safe. The only exception is if your own country is in a very low risk of infection and in a "bubble" with the destination.


16

I can't really comment on many specifics for the US, but I can comment in general on a few points of concern with heritage trains: Crashworthiness I don't know about the specific regulations in the US, and I haven't been able to find anything specific, but certainly globally most heritage/preserved/museum railways would generally be running at reduced speeds ...


16

Does the US Passport provide any kind of immunity against harassment, insult and intimidation by the border police of a destination country? As others have pointed out, no. Harassment is generally prohibited by local laws, but of course what you consider harassment and what the local law considers harassment may not be exactly the same thing. In general, ...


16

This is way more than I have ever done over the dozens of countries I’ve visited in all parts of the world, from places like USA to Zimbabwe to Brazil to China, and for trips ranging from backpacking in hostels to 5* hotel leisure trips to 18 hour work days at a remote office. No one has ever asked me for proof of my bank account situation on arrival. I’d ...


14

SAFE - because of a wave of new Federal regulations In 1999 the Federal Railroad Administration massively rewrote the steam locomotive rules (49 CFR 230). For instance: Historically, every time a new boiler was designed, the builder had to file a document called "Form No. 4". This documented every aspect of boiler design, and its safe operating ...


11

The hide tide submerges the 4-kilometer-long Passage du Gois twice a day, making it a very special road. The road goes from Beauvoir on the continent (East) to the island of Nourmoutier (West) and crosses the Bourgneuf bay. There a current flowing from the North to the South toward the Goulet de Fromentine. The current tends to remove or deposit sediments ...


7

Your passport is the primary identification of you, and your citizenship, to the immigration authorities. It's a sad fact of life that some people travel on forged documents, this is either to claim citizen of a (highly developed) country, in order to not require a visa, or To hide the fact that they over-stayed on a previous visit Forged documents often ...


7

For "just about any country", this is definitely not enough. First, in some countries, cash usage may still be prevalent, and ATMs few and far between. For those countries, you'll have to take quite some cash. Next, if any issue arises, a credit card is probably a much better option than a debit card (you usually have a lot more protection). Also, ...


6

It is a fair reasonable plan but it is also hard to generalize this to all countries. Let's see how we can improve it: Make sure you have or will have enough money for planned expenses, any automatic spending at home (such as automated bill payments and subscriptions) plus an extra buffer for travel. There are frequently extra unexpected costs while ...


6

As other answers have already stated, the simple answer is NO. It is a document issues by the US meant to identify you as a citizen to other countries but when entering their borders you are subject to their process and laws. The main issue with your question is that, even if it did, the border control officers would have to recognize it as a genuine US ...


5

I don't know when and where the limits for aviation have been set and would be interested to learn more about that but I do know a thing or two about ergonomics so here is some relevant background. Legal limits, when they exist are often considerably higher, certainly for men. The International Labour Organisation compiles them and at the end of the 1980s, ...


5

What does "enough money on my bank account" really mean - enough money for what? Enough money for everything you plan to spend - of course But also enough money for potentially foreseeable problems such as having to change your flight ticket home, spend an extra couple of nights at your hotel/accommodation, purchase travel back to the airport ...


5

Having recently returned form vacation, allow me to offer the opposite perspective on travel as the other answer. Having postponed two trips earlier in the year due to airline cancellations and covid restrictions, I pushed my vacation dates as far as possible to increase my odds of safe travel but eventually came the deadline when the choice was between ...


5

deaths per passenger mile If you are looking at "safety", that's actually the wrong metric. People do die on airplanes and boats but the majority of these fatalities have natural causes. If you look at accidental death's only, the numbers are really too small to make any meaningful statistical comparison. In the 5 years from 2014-2018 there was a ...


4

Never do this. I just got off the road in Revelstoke and am writing this after the most harrowing hour of driving along winding mountain roads in the dark with 4 semis tailgating me and oncoming semis blinding you with their headlights. The road lines are practically non-existent and you can’t see more than 5 metres in front of you. If you go too slow, the ...


3

About bank cards: Pack my VISA debit card That is a big security hole. A thief might have access to all your money – take a credit card. Who the hell has two bank cards? I have two credit cards. I use one for online purchases and one for in-person purchases. If one gets compromised, I can still spend by using the other. Neither has any fees (unless I can'...


3

The generic plastic bottle cap can be sealed outside of a factory. If you ever bought craft beer on tap take away, they will pour it in a plastic bottle and then seal it with a plastic cap. Then it looks completely legit. Plastic cap can be put on a bottle together with the plastic ring which holds it fast. But then it will hold the bottle with plastic ...


3

The US passport (as well as any other) doesn't provide much more than an identification. As a foreign citizen, you may expect a treatment not much worse (or in some cases, a bit better, but just a bit) than the country's own citizens. On the other hand, showing a passport that "looks suspicious" converts you from an ordinary traveler into a suspect....


3

The British passport states 'Her Britannic Majesty's Secretary of State requests and requires in the name of Her Majesty all those whom it may concern to allow the bearer to pass freely without let or hindrance and to afford the bearer such assistance and protection as may be necessary.' Theoretically, if a British citizen was harassed by Johnny Foreigner, ...


3

Listen to the safety briefing and other announcements. The airline will tell you what you shouldn't do. My experience: They used to tell passengers to switch off all electronic devices, but starting from a few years ago, they started telling passengers to switch off large electronic devices, and small devices may be used if they are securely held in your ...


2

There is still no legal requirement in the UK to carry your passport with you all the time. Traveling around I take it with me, as it is safer on my person than left behind in a hostel or even in a hotel room. But when staying with friends I leave it in their house. I do usually also carry my national (EU) ID card but have not needed that any time in the UK, ...


2

They are perfectly safe, as long as they are well installed. In my 36 years of life, using them practically all my life, I never had any problems. There are brands in Brazil that develop showers of the highest quality.


2

Yes, sealed water bottles can be unsafe. If you look at the comments on the question, two different links are given for historic events in the western world, well known brands. (Link one, by from a comment by @Stuart F) (Link two, from a comment by @Fattie) And this is from companies that are/were reputed to be safe. In my country, the Netherlands, the ...


1

Used these showers every day for two years and never had a problem. Noticed that 220 volts produced better hot water than the 110. Don't be scared.


1

If you don't mind carrying cash on your person then a method that I have used may suit you. I have a thin "pouch" that sits comfortably against my skin and is arranged to sit with the top about at my belt line and sitting offset to one side where it rides comfortably. I can carry my passport and a few large denomination banknotes and maybe a bank ...


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