Hot answers tagged

15

Yes, you're overthinking. The name of the game in North Korea is brinksmanship: they push the envelope to extract concessions, but are not stupid enough to commit an actual act of war, like shooting down a passenger airplane. Also, North Korea does not test anti-aircraft missiles, but ballistic missiles aimed at specific targets on the ground. These fly ...


14

It is safe. Demonstrations mostly occur on the weekends, are quite localized, are mostly peaceful and don't target tourists. If you are paranoid, avoid wearing black clothes, since that's one of the way protesters identify themselves (my French contacts advised me to wear a yellow vest to make sure I'm not mistaken for a protester). I have seen a few ...


7

It's perfectly safe. I've been there a few weeks ago, and the only inconvenience I encountered were unpredictable MTR station and system closures, but in case that happens there are always alternatives (buses, taxis and ultimately walking). The Citymapper and MTR apps are useful as they provide notifications of closures in real time, and alternative routes ...


4

Generally, when travelling on days of major celebrations, it is hard to estimate the level of celebrations that may take place in transit hubs such as bus stations or airports. Halloween, while it is celebrated in much of Uruguay and Argentina similarly to the United States, is still not considered a major holiday, which reduces the possibility of any forms ...


2

A couple of options. As you've noted, the airport doesn't have luggage storage. Hotels/hostels often will store for a fee, or worst case, book a 'night' there even if you don't use it, and just 'check in' and store your bag. Flying Dog Hostel Iquitos is one example that offers luggage storage: And according to Wikitravel, the Emperador Terraza Hotel also ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible