Hot answers tagged

67

The picture is of horses in the road. When I stayed with friends in The New Forest, UK, where free range ponies roam (not actually wild), they often block the road in groups, and nothing apparently will move them. But my friend taught me how: Be gentle, do not alarm them, give them time. Open the car windows, so the ponies can see you, and then Lightly pat ...


36

In my country, since it's a large country with a lot of long highways across deserts and mountains where a wide range of animals cross the streets (mainly camels, baboons and donkeys), I have faced that a lot. I am unaware if there are laws for this, but out of personal experience I learned a few Dos and Don'ts: Before approaching them, ensure no cars on ...


22

Stay in your car, as in the car you are a car and not a danger or enemy. Walking you may be seen as danger and the animals may try to scare you off, which can be dangerous for your health. If you do have the time, I would wait and enjoy. But if it takes long or if you are in a hurry you can drive slowly forward. Most of the animals living near roads are ...


17

It depends on the species. If you're driving in Sápmi (Lapland) and there are reindeer on the road, shout at them. They'll understand a human voice much better than a car honk or engine. You may need to get out of your car so they can see as well as hear you. If you just honk, they will probably just keep staring at your car in mild curiosity. If you do ...


10

In the UK, the Highway code offers specific guidance: Rule 214 Animals. When passing animals, drive slowly. Give them plenty of room and be ready to stop. Do not scare animals by sounding your horn, revving your engine or accelerating rapidly once you have passed them. Look out for animals being led, driven or ridden on the road and take extra care. ...


8

First, look for people. If the animals are with some people, just sit tight and wait. A few minutes won't hurt you. The people can see you, you don't need to make noises or otherwise let them know you planned to drive through here. They know that. Second, evaluate whether you think these are completely wild animals (monkey, moose, elephant, rhino) or likely ...


7

Yes, although somewhat rare, they do happen. And most importantly, because of the weight and structure of a camel, they are usually deadly. Some examples from recent years (all sources in Hebrew): October 1st, 2019: 2 injured in a collision with a camel on route 316 at the entrance to Hura, the driver died in the hospital a week and a half later. October ...


6

To add to the other very good answers already posted: Remember that for most animals, a road isn't really their ideal place to be. There's nothing growing there to graze on, and the ground is hard and hot. For that reason, most animals you'll encounter are actually in transit over the roadway (just like you), not congregating long-term. Try to judge ...


6

I would wait at least a few minutes. There does not seem to be anything edible on the road, and there are some tasty (to horses) looking weeds on either side, so they will probably not stay on the road for long. If they do not move in the next 10 minutes or so I would slowly edge the car forward. Honking, or any sudden move, might spook them, creating risk ...


3

I spent some time in Iran back in 2016 with my girlfriend. My answer is based off that experience, but shouldn't necessarily be considered an exhaustive answer. As we were a couple we were advised to pretend to get a fake wedding ring to pretend that we were married. When we actually got there no one really questioned it too closely. As you guys aren't ...


3

I just asked a police officer today if it was safer when walking in street to walk facing the traffic or in front of oncoming vehicles. He said better in front of traffic. But last week, I got an entirely different answer from another police officer. I guess I should go to the dept. of motor vehicles. But it only makes sense to me that it is safer to be able ...


3

Most "kinda tame" animals such as the ones in the photo (horses) will move away if something big approaches. As will many, but not all "wild" animals. Most will, without panic, avoid something that makes (moderate) noise, most will react rather negatively to something that makes sudden, harsh noises or is moving rapidly. Most animals will react favorably to ...


2

In a more general sense, what to do will depend on many factors, including: where you are, the size and number of animals, the type of animal, the type of road, the vehicle you are driving, how fast you are going when you first see the animals, local laws, whether the animals are attended by someone (a farmer for example), and so on. In general try to avoid ...


2

Specific to deer (and perhaps other ungulates) in the night-time: the phenomena of deer frozen in the headlights is well-known. I encountered it once. Flashing high beam (from dipped beam) did nothing. Switching to sidelights did: the deer relaxed and moved away as soon as I switched. The deer weren't entirely frozen in my headlights. My car was one of ...


2

There is lot of misinformation going around on this; so lets break it down. First off, at the time of writing the chances that someone on a Munich-London flight has the Coronavirus are extremely remote. There are currently a dozen or so cases in Bavaria, in a population of millions. Second, you will not be able to tell if the person has “the symptoms”, or ...


1

Besides all the fear-mongering in the media - please consider the travel-warnings of the CDC. Just take the suggested precautions and bring your own medical face-mask to MUC terminal. Latex gloves can also help with avoiding to touch the face accidentally (this requires training). And if you should notice suspect it after the take-off, contact a flight ...


1

The other answer is great, but it addresses only the missiles and indirect fire threat to Israel, posed from Lebanon and the Gaza strip, sadly there are other security threats, the "conventional" terrorist attack, which in the last years took the form of stabbings or vehicle attacks. For these, there is no preliminary warning system, and there is no "...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible