The Stack Overflow podcast is back! Listen to an interview with our new CEO.

Hot answers tagged

78

I trespass for a living (I'm a geologist) in Georgia mostly, but have in pretty much all of the Eastern U.S. So, when planning field work the first thing I do is get on the internet and search for county tax assessor's maps. The online maps will show who owns the parcels; state, county, federal, or private. If they are private then I'll do a white pages ...


65

When you're out driving around If you're not on a road, you're probably on private property unless otherwise indicated. National or state parks would be the primary exception to that. Granted, there are many of those in Tennessee and North Carolina. If there's a specific property you want to visit and you know it is private, you really should seek ...


21

Unlike some European countries where one is expected to hike through what look like fenced private property, the U.S. is generally more like New Zealand: private property is usually marked, often quite clearly. "No Trespassing" signs are quite common in U.S. rural areas, and often redundant. Fences almost always indicate to humans Do Not Pass because this ...


20

The dotted line you see on Google Maps is the administrative border between the districts Yamakoshi and Abuta. Looking at other maps of the region, there is however a foot path from the station to the beach and to the Buddhist temple. If you look at Google Maps, there are several photo spheres along this path, and it seems easily walkable. I can find no ...


18

Taking North Carolina as an example, since you did, if the property is not posted, you are not trespassing if you do not enter any buildings, and until someone tells you to leave: First degree trespass (Section 14-159.12): Without permission entering or remaining: On someone else's property that's enclosed/secured as to clearly demonstrate an intent ...


16

Generally most law in the US goes like this: you must reasonably search some length of every fenceline for "No Trespassing" signs, e.g. Every 500 feet. You don't need to search a length of fenceline if you are at an obvious human-travel threshold, such as a gate, obvious roadlike path, etc. Beware also signs which have been vandalized or missing - you'd ...


13

First of all, please let me explain what is Tokyo. Tokyo is not a city in its traditional meaning, Tokyo is a whole prefecture and at least half of it is covered by evergreen forests and scenic mountains. Quite unexpected for Tokyo, right? There are bears in Japan and even in Tokyo. But odds of meeting one are quite low, so I would not worry. Monkeys are ...


13

Wikipedia maintain a list of car-free places, organised by continent and by country (credit to choster's comment). It includes many that aren't islands, but it's easy to find islands on the list. There's also a French-language list restricted to car-free islands on French Wikipedia. Here's a selection of notable islands taken from that site, I've tried to ...


10

That's actually quite common. There are stations on the Welsh Highland Railway and Algoma Central that are also accessible only by rail. Many cabins along the Algoma Central are accessible only by rail or floatplane, and the train makes a flagstop for those patrons. Tourist railways have been known to have "stations" in the middle of nowhere, either as ...


10

It'd be helpful if you indicated which locations you plan to visit as the situation can vary depending on whether it is a popular tourist destination or not. But here's more or less a general answer: Unless if you plan to drive to a remote location with few population, booking a hotel won't be a problem since majority of hotels have employees that can speak ...


9

You may like to check out Mapov.com. It's a map-based Search Engine for Hotels and covers rural areas as well as cities. Because it's based on a map you can discover hotels in really tucked away places and get a good feel for the area. It also shows the lowest prices from 7 of the world's top providers! (Full disclosure: I currently work with the ...


8

I've taken many-many train rides in Stredocesky Kraj (the district surrounding Prague). The only things you can see are train stations, industrial zones, small forests, and agricultural fields. Whether or not you consider this exciting depends on what you like to see during your travels. You can see what a typical train ride in Czech Republic looks like in ...


8

If you have a hand-held GPS unit, you can get property boundaries on a card that slots into the GPS. They're marketed for hunters, but they're great for anyone who will be travelling through back country. This allows you to see property ownership near your current location. These chips are sold by the state, or you can get the same info on a smart phone app....


7

You may not realize it, but that's actually quite a difficult set of conditions. One by one: Well, this one's easy, there are no lethal animals anywhere near Tokyo. Also not a problem, public transport anywhere around Tokyo is also easy. "Off the beaten track" means relying on buses instead of trains, but you certainly don't need to rent a car. But... If ...


7

I actually almost answered this question in your other question :). Simply put, Indian railways has a very very powerful backend development team (their reservations were running fine with a cross country network when internet was still unheard of), however their front-end team is amateur at best. IRCTC which is a reasonably good portal is not owned and ...


5

I lived in AR and my driveway was a township road and passed no more then 15' from the house then continued on up the mountain and if you were really observant you could see the road by the different types of vegetation and there were a lot of roads like that but your best bet was to check the county GIS also if in doubt ask local residents. Also I cannot ...


5

There is little public transport in Mongolia, particularly if you want to visit the countryside. You can rent your own car, but that will be expensive. Plus, what happens when your car breaks down in the middle of nowhere? How are you going to make sure you always have enough gas? I think your best bet is to go on an arranged tour, like the one you did, ...


4

The most "bucolic" area very close to central London is Hampstead Heath, which gives a reasonable impression of being out in the countryside once you're away from the perimeter and is certainly big and varied enough for a decent walk. It has reasonably villagey areas with pubs around it near Hampstead Heath station and Highgate, another pub (the Spaniard's ...


4

I don't know if France is in the Southern Europe you target, nor if you are open to other types of accommodation than hotel. However, there is an organisation in France that references place rentals for leisure. There are mostly bed&breakfast and cottages. It is usually quite friendly and most of the time in the middle of nowhere. Their targeted ...


4

For a huge network of trains, it is possibly difficult(not impossible) to store all the data online and for this reason, Ministry of Railways in India has been publishing a book yearly called 'Trains at a Glance'. While this book is easily available at kiosks in India, there is luckily a pdf version available on the website of the Ministry: Trains at a ...


3

Jogashima (城ヶ島), at the southern tip of the Miura peninsula, is a decent day trip. Rocky beaches, tidepools with marine life, and a nice hike along a bluff where you can see cormorants. There's a small town with eateries serving fresh seafood. The Keikyu rail/bus network sells a one-day pass (I think weekend only) that will cover the train and bus fare from ...


3

Enoshima, Kamakura and Zushi are on the Shonan coast and reachable from central Tokyo in 90 minutes. Enoshima has direct express service from Shinjuku. Kamakura has the giant buddha but you can easily avoid both him and the very large temple at the north end of Kamakura. All have sandy beaches and bustling retail areas. A bit further down the road is ...


3

Hokkaido is great, although transportation there is far from perfect. While relying on public transport only the easiest places to visit would be Sapporo, hot springs around there and Hakodate. Taisetsuzan is amazing place itself but there's nothing to do without a car, unfortunately. Of course, buses do run, but travelling from one place to another place ...


3

The ACSI Eurocampings site has a pretty comprehensive search engine and an app to find campsites.


3

As I quoted in this answer, one style of accommodation in some countries are the homes owned by the International Friends of Nature. This seems to be mostly active in German and English speaking countries, but not exclusively. Those are very bucolic accommodations. You might have to hike quite a bit from the nearest bus-stop or car-park! They are typically ...


2

While Uber/Lyft are generally focused on urban areas, their coverage areas can include fairly rural parts. Greyhound, Trailways, and other bus lines serve many rural locations on and off the Interstate Highway System through extensive partner agreements with local or regional operators. Amtrak travels through many rural areas, not being connected to the ...


2

The Aran islands in Ireland. Locals have cars, but AFAIK there's no way to rent a car on the islands or drive a car onto them. Renting a bicycle is common. The islands are quite accessible and well toured. There are ferries several times a day, as well as flights. They contain lots of sites worth seeing.


2

In addition to the great car-free US islands mentioned in other answers, let me recommend Theodore Roosevelt Island in the Potomac River. The island is a National Park and is uninhabited, but it is a famous geographical/border oddity as the island itself is fully within the District of Columbia, but you can only travel to the island via the footbridge from ...


2

onXmaps FTW! It shows public and private landowner information so you can avoid trespassing. The app can be used offline by downloading the maps onto your device. This means you DO NOT need cell service once the maps are downloaded to your phone.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible