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18

The word you are looking for is haikyo (廃墟, "ruin"), and Japan has plenty of them for pretty much every conceivable category of building... except temples and shrines. Unlike corporate enterprises that get abandoned as soon as they stop making money, temples and shrines were never intended as money-making enterprises in the first place, so their costs are ...


11

Great answer by jpatokal. One more thing to add to the kaimyō topic is that Japanese temples are run by private people as a business under something you could call a "religion business license" which is 100% tax-free. These businesses however do not only operate religious services such as funerals but also a lot of other non-religious operations such as golf ...


11

During the Soviet period, some scientific research center was established in this building (don't remember the profile of them, any more). In the late 1990s the building was granted by Georgia to the Greek state as a residence for the Greek ambassador in Tbilisi. The building still is uninhabited and looks "as is" now.


11

Damn, I wanted to wait for 2 days with answer for this question, and now it had activity :) All I could find is quite uncertain, but it is better than nothing. During the war for independence between Greece and Turkey in 19th century, many Greeks migrated to the Russian Empire, in Georgia. Most of them lived in Tsalka, but many of them had some property in ...


10

Yes, (as of 2002) you can cross at Allenby bridge and then take a mini-bus to Petra; however, you'll want to get your visa in advance. Crossing at Eilat would probably be faster. You will probably want to spend two nights at Petra, so that you can have a travel day, a day to visit the ruins, and then another travel day. There are many inexpensive hostels ...


8

When service to a single station, as opposed to an entire line, is discontinued as in the case of Kami-Shirataki station, the trains which used to stop there are still running, they just no longer make that stop. So it's possible to "pass by" the station by simply taking those trains. Whether it is easy to actually go to the station obviously varies, but ...


7

The town you're looking for seems to be Leh in the Indian state of Jammu and Kashmir quite in the north of India. Leh seems to be the common name, but in Tibetian it is written like that: གླེ. The picture you have mentioned in the question could be either from the Shey Monastery or similar monasteries such as Thiksey, or the Leh Palace. However, all of them ...


7

#1 for popularity according to TripAdvisor is Su Nuraxi: Su Nuraxi is a settlement consisting of a seventeenth century BCE Nuraghe, a bastion of four corner towers plus a central one, and a village inhabited from the thirteenth to the sixth century BCE, developed around the Nuraghe. They are considered by scholars the most impressive expression of ...


7

Depends. It's kind of unusual for individual stations to be taken out of service (unless they're building a replacement nearby), but Japan has lots of abandoned train lines and, thanks to rural depopulation, lots more on the way. There are three basic possibilities: Demolished. Usually happens when there is some other sensible use for the land: for ...


6

From what I know going into to Jordan from Israel is harder than going from Israel to Jordan. If you haven't booked your trip yet I would consider flying into Jordan then making your way to Israel. If possible I would stay for 2 nights for what it's going to cost you ro get there. You can see the Wadi Rum while you are there as well. I didn't look into ...


6

When I went to Japan I wanted to hunt for some abandoned places as well, even though I was mostly interested in modern-looking places like Nara Dreamland. Anyway, my starting point was Jordy Meow's site. He is a French photographer based in Tokyo specializing in urban exploration. Temple of Lies* is just an example. Beware that he doesn't give any ...


6

If you are really really curious I may suggest to ask the question directly to the Greek embassy officials in Tbilisi www.greekembassy.ge or maybe contact to tbilisiguide.ge The building is located at the "Sololaki Alley".


4

It is worth noting that according to UNESCO, there is only one known site containing the remains of a Carthaginian city: Kerkuane, in Tunisia. This Phoenician city was probably abandoned during the First Punic War (c. 250 B.C.) and as a result was not rebuilt by the Romans. The remains constitute the only example of a Phoenicio-Punic city to have ...


4

Here's a blog post about it, including a pointer to the location on map.goo.ne.jp. As you can see, it's hard to find and there's barely anything there aside from a few overgrown stone walls. The last couple of photos are of a shrine along the way, not the ruins.


4

This is an old question but there is a lot of conflicting information above, and much it conflicts with my personal experience living on Ikoma Mountain in 2000-2001 (at the time of this writing I live in Okinawa, and the situation isn't entirely different). I lived in front of a large shrine called 石切神社 in Eastern Osaka. (Oh! it has its own website now! (O.o)...


2

At least at present, yes, there are tour companies that do 1-day tours to Petra from Eilat. I was on such a tour about 6 weeks ago (i.e. November 2016.) I wouldn't recommend trying to do a day trip from the Allenby crossing, though, as that would be a rather long drive for a day trip, about 3.5 hours each way according to Google Maps. From the Eilat/Aqaba ...


2

You might interested in Kawaradera Temple Ruins in Nara.


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