Episode #125 of the Stack Overflow podcast is here. We talk Tilde Club and mechanical keyboards. Listen now
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CBP stands for Customs and Border Protection. Proof of citizenship, as other answers have pointed out, resolves the issue of whether you should be allowed to enter. It does not resolve the issue of what customs duties you need to pay. The last question on the first page of the US Customs Declaration and the back of the form require different answers from ...


25

No, it isn't generally allowed but it is indeed foreseen by the Schengen regulation when the queues are particularly unbalanced. When it does happen, whether third-country nationals (i.e. non-EU/EEA/Swiss) are allowed to use other lanes is up to the border guards. The rules about this are defined in article 9 of the Schengen Borders code. 2. (a) ...


23

Note: this question was later cross-posted in Expats with the result of further information being available. Those interested should visit the cross-posted question at UK immigration application: Evidence / Proof that I lived there (EU citizen, no passport stamps) Just curious if they keep track of me entering / exiting the UK and whether that's saved ...


16

To provide an update and back up the answer provided by littleadv here: My wife completed the I-407 form, went to an interview (scheduled) with the US embassy here in Korea, and relinquished her permanent residence status. The official gave her back a signed copy of the form showing that she had given up her status. A short time later, we applied for an ...


15

If your wife has an article 10 residence card, she does not need a visa if she travels with you. The UK's residence card for the family member of an EEA national is an article 10 card. She is also entitled to use the EU/EEA/Swiss passports queue when she arrives in the Schengen area, even though she doesn't have an EU, EEA, or Swiss passport, because she ...


14

Generally you must apply for a Schengen visa from the embassy or consulate serving the place of your residence. This is not necessarily the country of your nationality; if you are in a third country on a long stay visa such as a student or work visa, then you are a resident of that third country. The regulations do contain an exception, though. Regulation (...


14

I believe that a generic answer is impossible. Conscription as such is not considered a human rights violation by Western nations, any many have extradition treaties with each other. In a slightly different example, the case of an US Army deserter in Germany is making his way through the legal system. So far he has lost in court, but IIRC there are still ...


14

The freedom of movement rules are promulgated as a directive which means it is up to each member state to flesh them out in its own laws. As such, it differs considerably between member states which registration requirements they impose on EU/EEA citizens -- and where they do, they don't have to use the same detailed criteria for when the registration ...


13

Away from the U.S. less than 180 days, no problem. Between 180 days and a year, maybe a problem. More than a year, definitely a problem. You should plan to return home (the U.S. is your home, right?) before the 1 year mark, and be prepared to explain why you were away so long and show evidence that you have not abandoned your residency. It's important to ...


12

There's no specific rule saying you can't enter the US on a tourist visa after your PR status or other visa expires. However, that's not to say it won't raise questions. They're probably going to have what happened on their records, and they'll want an explanation of why she's visiting, how she'll support herself, and evidence that she plans on leaving ...


12

I have now received answers from two official sources, Edinburgh and London offices. It was impossible to get through to anyone in London on the phone but they responded to an email on the same day: Dear Johnny Baloney, Thank you for contacting Chinese Visa Application Service Centre. As an EU national, you are not required to provide any ...


12

I'm a dual Peruvian-American citizen having taken my American friends to Peru I can attest that, while controversial, that the cheaper fares are meant to encourage Peruvian citizens who may not otherwise be able to afford air travel on their modest incomes. This is along the lines of Florida resident discounts at Disney World etc. So to answer your ...


12

A Canadian permanent resident who wishes to return to Canada and does not have a valid permanent resident card can apply for a permanent resident travel document. Attempting to enter as a visitor is unlikely to succeed because, as a German national, your boyfriend needs eTA authorization to fly to Canada, but, like Canadian citizens, permanent residents are ...


11

Yes, it is still required. In addition the the official government source that you provided in your question, the following link should also verify this. U.S. Government Travel Site (Last updated: Jan 28, 2016) Blood Test: All visitors and new residents to Iraq, with the exception of those travelling on a tourist visa, must have a blood test for HIV and ...


11

The USCIS Maintaining Permanent Residency does not give any timelines on when they would consider someone to have abandoned their permanent residency status in the US. Some items that could cause that include taking up residency in another country, not filing tax returns, not maintaining a residence (house/apartment) in the USA, etc. Another USCIS page, ...


10

You lost your permesso di soggiorno (Italian residency permit), whilst on a trip abroad. You now wish to return to Italy and are afraid you won't be allowed to fly back to Italy. The solution is to report the lost permit to the local authorities to obtain an official statement. You should then take this statement to your local Italian mission and ask for a ...


10

Yes, they can, indefinitely. However, the penalty for staying longer than three months without registering (not "90 days") must be proportional to the penalty imposed upon a country's own citizens for not registering. In particular, they cannot be deported. In most countries this is a fine; in others there's no penalty at all. There seems to be no rule about ...


9

All you need is your green card, but if you plan to be away for more than one year, you should get a reentry permit. If you don't get a reentry permit in that case, you may need a returning resident visa. There are also legal implications if you stay away for more than six months. Assuming your trip is shorter than six months, you should present your ...


8

As far as France is concerned you can leave and re-enter the country (and the Schengen area) with a récépissé for a renewal (récépissé de renouvellement de carte de séjour) but not with a récépissé for a first application (récépissé de première demande de carte de séjour) nor with the document you get if you applied for asylum (which can be either a ...


8

I asked using the contact form on www.britrail.net and got this reply: Dear Henning, We understand your point however your Danish passport is sufficient ID to validate your Britrail pass. Please don't worry and have a great trip! I think I'll be bringing a printout of that email ...


8

In general Indian nationals require a visa to enter Ireland: Nationals of the states or territorial entities listed below are subject to an Irish visa requirement for the purposes of travelling to the State. Possession of a valid Irish visa does not guarantee entry to the State. An Immigration Officer at the port of entry has the authority to grant or ...


8

AIUI the new rules on Iranian citizenship and visits only pertain to VWP travel. They should not be an issue for permanent residents. The bigger problem is that by spending too much time outside the US or by taking up residence abroad you may be deemed to have abandoned your permanent residence. According to http://www.familytousa.com/reentry-permit/ there ...


8

Yes, unfortunately, your reading is correct. A Fiktionsbescheinigung under § 81 Section 4 is only issued when you applied for a renewal (which is not your case) and it would say so explicitly on the document. Not allowing travel inside the Schengen area while waiting for a decision on a first application is also pretty standard (I have seen similar rules in ...


8

The UK electronically collects information of all passengers entering and exiting. When entering, you clear immigration whereby your entry is recorded. When exiting by air, the airline sends the passenger info to the Border Force, while if exiting by land (other than to Ireland), you clear immigration at the ferry port or train station. So yes, the Home ...


8

I had a tough time with this. Lets say you need to provide evidence of residence for the past five years (which is what I had to do). You have to have no more than 450 days absence in the 5 years, and no more than 90 days in the final year of that five years. Well, my issue was I travelled a lot. And I regularly spent 3+ months overseas (during winter). So ...


8

The Customs and Border Protection officer is confusing your status with that of a Resident or Non-Resident Alien for the purposes of US Tax Law, which a CBP officer is allowed to query your status under. Basically, US Tax Law requires non-citizen residents (so Resident and Non-Resident Aliens) to be taxed under given criteria, including the Substantial ...


7

If you continue reading the same page you will be able to find the required information: Reservation, Ticketing and Check-in Reservations must be confirmed for the first domestic sector. The dates of the remaining sectors may be left open and booked at any time before the departure of each domestic sector. Reservations may be accepted no more ...


7

No. Even Italians can't use a carta d'identita' to visit the US. You need a passport.


7

The card you're asking about would allow your wife to travel to Iceland without a visa. She can also travel to Iceland by getting a visa. That is probably the way to go, as outlined below. First, does your wife's current permit say that it is a "Residence card of a family member of an EEA national"? If so, it is an Article 10 (or Article 20) card. It ...


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