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0

I have been in the same situation with an other airline, one that sells one way only tickets. The flight was cancelled while we were at the airport to take the first flight, due to weather. The cancelation offer was to 'undo' the whole transaction, so I got the whole amount back, including costs. There were other offers, rebook to a different flight out for ...


5

I called Expedia. They offered to give me a voucher of 1700 CAD - 150 CAD fee = 1550 CAD that I could use for myself on the same airline, before October 2020.


0

I'm not sure if anything can be done right now to get your money back, other than to cancel and rebook with a lower price after paying the change of $ 200 CAD. However for future travel, I'll point you to Flight Network's price drop Protection ( it's a Canadian online travel co. based out of Missisauga and I have never used them) https://www.flightnetwork....


2

You didn't "lose" the money, you paid them to be sure you have a seat. That low price will not last for long, so a customer who can only pay 1000 could easily miss the opportunity and get no ticket at all. If you can tolerate not to get a ticket at all, you can make a bid on a flight (plenty of sites do this, e.g. skyauction). If the ticket price ever drops ...


4

The current pricing was influenced by yourself buying your ticket. That means it makes no sense from the math alone to allow you to change. That could be mathematically overcome if you pay extra to make that change possible. Your new price would not be much lower in total. It is even possible that your ticket is cheaper now only because you bought it: ...


2

If you purchased your tickets with a credit card, many cards have a price protection policy for this kind of scenario. Credit card companies usually use the example of a TV going on sale a few days after purchase, but it's worth checking if your card also covers flight price changes.


2

In an immediate sense it’s not likely you can demand relief, but there are specific uncommon circumstances when the fare includes fees, refunds, or rates imposed by a sovereign power, so a large fare change on an international flight from Vancouver to Buenos Aires might be the result of an action that would include you. You can nonetheless request ...


7

Most (but not all) tickets are changeable. You pay the difference in ticket price plus a change fee. If the new ticket is cheaper than the old one, you do get a refund. The reason why the ticket is cheaper was that Air Canada opened up a lower fare class that previously was blocked. You can try to change your existing ticket to the new fare class. Expect to ...


11

Yes, you can almost certainly get some of the difference back - although the exact details will depend on the airline... As mentioned in Taking advantage of Jetblue sale when I already bought ticket?, United airlines will give you a full refund of the difference minus $50 if you bought the ticket less than 30 days ago. Other airlines may have similar ...


42

Unless you bought a high fare class that explicitly allows for cancellations at no penalty (unlikely given the price you paid), there's almost certainly nothing you can do. Sorry! As for the future, buying airplane tickets is tough, but I have had moderate success doing the following -- especially for international travel where prices can fluctuate wildly: ...


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