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30

I've worked in the hospitality industry for 18 years in the United States so I can answer this with some knowledge. Most states require a hotel to post their "Maximum Possible Rate" on the back of the guest room door. This is to keep a hotel from "price gouging" in the event of a natural disaster or even from discriminatory practices, (charging someone of a ...


20

Those are the rates for the days of your stay, not the time that you order. Most hotels have higher prices during times of high-demand, and often higher rates on weekends, etc.


12

There are a myriad of reasons, but they fall into two categories: different "extras" with the room and/or terms and conditions particular marketing or discounting campaigns that they hoped not everyone would see An example of the first would be paying less for a prepay-no-refunds booking than for a no-deposit-cancel-with-no-charge booking. Or paying less ...


6

Technically? Sure. There's nothing stopping you from pressing the required buttons to do this. Practically? This isn't the best idea. The thing about prepaid rates is that they generally are offered at a discount - because you are locked in and can't cancel. The benefit of this to the hotel diminishes as the date of the reservation approaches, and with it, ...


4

There are many reasons for this: Seasonal Promotions or campaigns Pre-booked rooms (some sites gets favorable rates by reserving a block of rooms, which they sell) Reduced or restrictive conditions (pre-paid in advance only, heavy cancellation fees) Combinations/Packages - for example, a room is discounted if you also reserve a flight; or a room is ...


4

The price only affects the nights you stay. Booking at different dates shouldn't make a difference, unless the hotel hikes up the rates due to demand. So for your example, book now, tomorrow or next week - if you're staying on the 13th June 2015, you'll be paying their rate of $102.00 USD per night, plus tax of 15%.


3

It means the $ value shown is for two guests (that is two people are allowed in the room). Often hotels apply a surcharge if extra people are wanting to share a room. However, since you've not specified the site, I'll also mention that sometimes it means you can't have less. For example, a twin dorm in a hostel often requires you book both beds. So you can'...


3

Those can actually be the correct cheapest available rates for the new year... or Those prices are erroneous... Without contacting the hotel directly you won't know. Two possibly scenarios to explain your observations: There are no ordinary rooms available and the best rate the booking calendar can display is the rate for an expensive suite. (The lack ...


3

I suspect what you're finding are hotel consilidators Hotel consolidator (also called a hotel broker or discounter) is a travel company or business that buys up blocks of hotel rooms in top destinations and then resells them at discounted rates to the final customer More often you will see this with non-chain hotels as most of the chain hotels like Hilton, ...


2

Interesting question. Try searching the Google Maps to zero in on your geographic area of interest, then put "찜질방" in the search bar. For example this one near the tracks has reviews which mention prices W8000/10,000) and Google will translate for you.


2

For Nahkchivan you're probably better off using local tourist agencies. Search for "nakhchivan tours" on the internet and you'll find a couple companies that can give you more listings than the major booking websites. While this might not get you the cheapest accommodation, the thing with Azerbaijan is that there's this registration rule for visitors (see: ...


2

In Japan, unlike most of the world, you pay per person, not per room, for most hotels. So for instance, if I travel alone on business to a hotel, it will be ¥6,000/night/person (assuming two guests). If I actually try to reserve it for one person, it will likely be a little bit more (maybe ¥6,500/night) for the exact same room. This does not make sense at ...


2

Virtually every hotel that is connected via the Global Delivery System has some type of automated occupancy rate tuning algorithm that "tweaks" the rates per room per night. I've seen rooms that typically sell for $500/night as low as $69/night direct from the hotel when they have an unforeseen shortfall of rooms booked. You might find if you look at this ...


1

It doesn't matter when you book it, your trip has to be on that date to get that price. For Example: If you stay Thursday, Friday and Saturday, you will be charged (153 + 104 + 102) * 1.15 (TAX) = 412.85.


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