14

Your goals when filling any visa application are a) to be truthful and b) to not raise undue attention. In your case, these conflict a bit, so the best way out is to write an address through which you are theoretically contactable in your country of citizenship (the passport you're using). This can be a parent, a friend, really anybody who knows who you ...


14

The purpose of a ‘leave letter’ is to help demonstrate ties to your home country and a compelling reason to leave the UK at the end of your visit. The options you have if you no longer have employment to return to include a) defer your trip until you have a new job and can get a leave letter, or a contract showing a confirmed start date; or b) prove other ...


13

If you are not working then it doesn't make any sense to have a "leave letter". There is nobody to give you one. It is not necessary. Of course you have very little chance of getting a visa while unemployed.


9

When you apply for a visa to visit the UK, one of the main things they want to see is evidence that you are genuinely planning to visit (i.e. you're not pretending to plan a visit but actually intending to stay forever). As such, they ask for evidence that you have a reason to leave at the end of your trip, generally in the form of proving close ties to your ...


9

Understandably when granting a visa to someones partner they want proof that person will not simply remain in the UK to be with said partner. Examples of proof of ties to home country include: Employment/Business ownership - Vacation approval from management, letter from employer to prove employment, pay slips Home ownership/Rent - Showing a lease ...


9

The general advice we have is that unless there was a serious error in the reading of your file you should not apply again. Not having minor documents included in your portfolio (that may be referred to by other documents) is not a serious error or omission. You don’t give the specific reason code your visa was denied but it was most probably the generic “...


7

Based on your tags my answer will be relevant to a non-immigrant visa for the USA. You need to prove that you will not stay in the US indefinitely, and that you will return to your home country, hence the demonstration of the 'significant ties'. These may depend on your age too. As a rule of thumb this can include, but is not limited to, the following in ...


6

Exiting and reentering would not achieve anything, there is no rule against multi-purpose stays. In the Schengen area, border guards only check whether you meet the requirements for entry, they do not grant you any permission, cannot attach additional conditions on your stay or anything like that. An invitation letter is useless, it's only useful for people ...


5

The article you linked to is about permanent residence in Canada, as you are just applying for a visitor visa for a short time this doesn't apply to you.


5

Many people have multiple jobs so this is not an unusual situation, and the visa officers will understand that. Explain in your letter the nature of the two jobs as you have done here. When you submit all the proof be sure to make it clear what job each one applies to. Submit proof of payment for both jobs as you have mentioned, such as the payslips and ...


4

It was a mistake to not include the evidence of land ownership. A typo isn't likely to matter much or at all, but it does show evidence of intention to leave Australia. This should be included. A child in college is not necessarily a sufficient family tie to show intention to leave, but a minor child would be. Since that child would have been traveling to ...


4

As long as you are truthful and bring all the evidence you need, you should not have a problem with this situation. You sister is staying for 7 days so she will have a booked return flight ticket to prove this. If your sister can also demonstrate strong ties to her home country, then this will help convincing the immigration officer reviewing her application ...


3

Immigration uses a process where they assume that you intend to permanently immigrate to the UK, seek employ or go on the dole... and then, allow you to present data that proves otherwise. That’s why proof of ties to your home country is so important. For instance suppose you are running a serious political campaign for a seat in your state legislature. ...


3

It’s not what you want to hear but IMHO you have zero chance of getting a UK visa based on your current personal circumstances. You fit the profile of a high risk applicant - young, no ties to your country of residence, existing connections in the UK etc etc. All of that will lead an ECO to conclude that the risk of an illegal overstay is unacceptably high.


3

There are three straightforward reasons for your refusal. You have asked for a ten week visa. Ten weeks in the UK is completely unnecessary to sit PLAB 2, and in view of your finances unreasonable. You are intending to spend your entire savings, an entire year of income, on this trip. That also seems unreasonable. A ten week trip seems even more ...


3

This question is almost impossible to answer properly since specific information needed is missing and therefor must be assumed to give in answer at all. If you are not interested in any of the legal MomboJumbo skip down to Question 2 Missing Citizenship of person Country that it applies to Assumptions homelessness is Voluntarily Context is for visa ...


3

To go to my university to get some document which will be of help in the future Really? Is that the best you came up with in a visa application? I'm sorry to be blunt but you just wasted your hard earned money. That was never going to get approved that way. Successful applicants spend a great deal of time or attention on applications to make a strong case. ...


3

‘Easier to apply’ may not translate into ‘easy to get’ given the previous refusal. The visa you apply for depends on what your intentions are, not what is easiest to obtain. Visit Visa: It’s highly unlikely that showing you have inheritance expectations will help demonstrate home ties. The savings should help, but you’ll need to explain the provenance of ...


2

To prove that your partner intends to return then the immigration authorities will look for several things to prove a strong intention to return. Family connections. That she leaves a child behind with their grandparents is good. Bring a copy of the child's birth certificate to prove this together with the letter from the grandmother you mentioned Job or ...


2

There is not a lot online on how pets are considered for ties to home country, but the fact that they are never mentioned in the lists with options shows they are not considered any strong tie. While you feel the dog as a family member, immigration officers do not. Likely out of experience as too many people would not return home to get back to the dog and ...


2

Having a job in your home country, especially a full-time one. Owning property there, or having a lease for property (e.g. a rented apartment or home where you live). Having reasonable to significant amounts of money in banks in your home country. Having family members back home. As for documents, it's not usually necessary to have proof of these things, ...


2

The cause of your refusal is probably Funds parking 1.200.000 Rupees has been deposited (for them) for no apparent reason they suspect that the cause is to make your Bank statements look good for this application You should read this answer What Is the Purpose of Bank Statements? carefully and try to resolve these irregularities.


2

All you need to include is a document that proves that you own the land, such as the Certificate of Occupancy, or the Deed of Assignment, showing that you are the property owner.


2

No one can predict how your visa process will go, but judging from the vast majority of visa related questions - my guess is your visa will be rejected. You have to understand that the visa issuing authorities are assuming you are a "de-facto immigrant", that is, they are looking for reasons why you would likely break the terms of the visa (don't return, ...


2

Are these strong grounds for a visitor visa, or is there any reason for rejection or suspicion? No, they’re not strong grounds. There are several weaknesses in the circumstances you describe. For example, no prior travel history (as you mention in a comment), and no ties to home (job, assets) apart from family. This question explains the likely outcome UK ...


2

To meet the eligibility criteria, you need to demonstrate that you can afford the trip and that you will leave the UK at the end of the intended stay because you have strong ties to your home country that would compel you to return. Your school verification helps towards demonstrating a reason to return, as does your part time employment. You will need to ...


1

What the government is looking for in the application process is evidence that you plan to return and not try and overstay in Canada. Any and all evidence that you think might help (Eg school fees indicate your kids are at school in your home country), a letter from your work, maybe a lease agreement - can help. They may ignore some of it, but more ...


1

A Verpflichtungserklärung (Sponsorship) alone is not sufficient, but must be taken togeather with her regular income. A visa is rarely issued soly based on a sponsorship. So one factor may be that the regular income has not been documented to the Consulate's satisfaction. Living on a possibility slim unemployed payments may not be considerd an incentive to ...


1

It isn't a required document for you to submit, but it would be helpful to prove ties to your home country, as it shows you have a wife who is staying behind during your trip who you financially support. Your case doesn't get automatically dismissed if you do not include it, but it could help your application.


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